Top PDF 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

16-19 education funding in England since 2010

16-19 education funding in England since 2010

We have protected the base rate of funding at £4,000 per student for all types of providers until 2020 to ensure that happens. Extra funding is provided where needed, for example, for students on large academic programmes and for providers to attract, support and retain disadvantaged 16 to 19-year olds. In addition, my Rt hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, announced in the Spring Budget a significant investment in technical education for 16-19 year olds, rising to an additional £500 million a year. The first £74 million of this investment will be allocated to help institutions build their capacity for the improved work placements that will form part of new T level programmes, from April 2018 to July 2019.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 13 June 2018: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 13 June 2018: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

The initial teaching and learning funding allocations for adult further education (FE) and skills in England fell from a 2010- 11 baseline of £3.18 billion to £2.94 billion in 2015-16, a reduction of 8% in cash terms or 14% in real terms. The allocation for 2015-16 fell further as a result of the 2015 Summer Budget, which reduced the non-apprenticeship part of the Adult Skills Budget (ASB) by an additional 3.9%. While funding for community learning and offender learning stayed fairly constant over the period, ASB funding declined by 29% in cash terms between 2010-11 and 2015-16 – this in part connected to the replacement of grant funding with loan funding for some learners from 2013-14 onwards. The minimum annual funding allocated to adult apprenticeships increased by 113% between 2010-11 and 2015-16,
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Adult further education funding in England since 2010

Adult further education funding in England since 2010

The initial teaching and learning funding allocations for adult further education (FE) and skills in England fell from a 2010-11 baseline of £3.18 billion to £2.94 billion in 2015-16, a reduction of 8% in cash terms or 14% in real terms. The allocation for 2015-16 fell further as a result of the 2015 Summer Budget, which reduced the non-apprenticeship part of the Adult Skills Budget (ASB) by an additional 3.9%. While funding for community learning and offender learning stayed fairly constant over the period, ASB funding declined by 29% in cash terms between 2010-11 and 2015-16 – this in part connected to the replacement of grant funding with loan funding for some learners from 2013-14 onwards. The minimum annual funding allocated to adult apprenticeships increased by 113% between 2010-11 and 2015-16, meaning that non-apprenticeship funding comprised a smaller proportion of the reduced ASB.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 21 April 2017: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 21 April 2017: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

The initial teaching and learning funding allocations for adult further education (FE) and skills in England fell from a 2010-11 baseline of £3.18 billion to £2.94 billion in 2015-16, a reduction of 8% in cash terms or 14% in real terms. The allocation for 2015-16 fell further as a result of the 2015 Summer Budget, which reduced the non-apprenticeship part of the Adult Skills Budget (ASB) by an additional 3.9%. While funding for community learning and offender learning stayed fairly constant over the period, ASB funding declined by 29% in cash terms between 2010-11 and 2015-16 – this in part connected to the replacement of grant funding with loan funding for some learners from 2013-14 onwards. The minimum annual funding allocated to adult apprenticeships increased by 113% between 2010-11 and 2015-16, meaning that non-apprenticeship funding comprised a smaller proportion of the reduced ASB.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 13 June 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 13 June 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

The overriding challenge for the 16–18 sector concerns the long- run stagnation in the level of resources available. By the end of the current Spending Review period in 2019–20, we expect that spending per student in further education will only be just above the level seen 30 years ago at the end of the 1980s. To date, school sixth forms have probably been better able to manage real- terms cuts in funding given that school funding per pupil was protected in real terms between 2010–11 and 2015–16. This clearly will not be possible indefinitely, especially as school
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 7 November 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 7 November 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

The term 16-19 education is used in this briefing to refer to education funded by the Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA) and its predecessor bodies through the 16-19 funding system. This refers to a broad range of educational provision, including (but not limited to), students aged 16-19 in maintained school and academy sixth forms, sixth form colleges, general further education (FE) colleges, and special schools. It also includes students aged 19 to 25 with Education, Health and Care Plans. It does not include students on apprenticeships or at higher education institutions.
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 7708, 20 March 2019 : Adult further education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 7708, 20 March 2019 : Adult further education funding in England since 2010

allocated at the spending review. In addition, while the categories used in the SFA annual accounts are similar to those used in the skills funding statements and letters, in some places they provide slightly more detail – for example, a more detailed breakdown of ASB expenditure between 2010-11 and 2014-15. The accounts also allow a consistent time series for all non-teaching expenditure excluding capital to be created back to 2010-11.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 4 December 2018: Adult further education funding in England since
2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 4 December 2018: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

The budget for Advanced Learner Loans is planned to increase from a 2015-16 baseline of £0.20 billion to £0.48 billion in 2019-20. The 2015-16 baseline is based on an estimate of the likely value of loans paid put in the year, which is £298 million less than the initial budget allocation set out in the skills funding letter. Whether the forecast increase in loan budgets result in an increase in loan funding provided to students depends in part, of course, on the future demand for loans (see box three above).

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College higher education in England 1944–66 and 1997–2010

College higher education in England 1944–66 and 1997–2010

AsacontributiontothehistoryofhighereducationinEnglishfurthereducationcolleges,two policyepisodesaresketchedandcompared.Bothperiodssawattemptstoexpandcourses of higher education outside the universities. In the first, ahead of policies to concentrate non-university higher education in the strongest institutions, efforts were made after 1944 to recognize a hierarchy of colleges, with separate tiers associated with different volumes andtypesofadvancedfurthereducation.Inthesecond,soonafterunificationofthehigher educationsectoratthebeginningofthe1990s,allcollegesinthefurthereducationsector were encouraged to offer higher-level programmes and qualifications, with a reluctance or refusalonthepartofcentralgovernmenttoplan,coordinate,orconfigurethisprovision.The twoepisodeshighlightverydifferentassumptionsaboutwhattypesofinstitutionsshouldbe involvedinwhatkindsofhighereducation.Theyarearemindertooofhowshortisthepolicy memoryonhighereducationwithinmodern-daygovernmentsandtheiragencies.
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Further and Higher Education Partnerships in England, 1997-2010: a study of cultures and perceptions

Further and Higher Education Partnerships in England, 1997-2010: a study of cultures and perceptions

174 Whilst the main divide in progression into traditional higher education still privileges those from higher social classes, the working classes themselves should not be viewed as a homogeneous group. As Brine (2006) identifies in her paper on lifelong learning, ‘this classed construction is further gendered and raced’ (Brine, 2006, p. 653). Through a discourse of deficit, an array of individuals is presented as at risk and the risk (ibid, p. 656) to the expansion and success of the knowledge economy, which is projected as the basis for future growth. The single teenage mother, the unemployed youth, the part- time employed older female, the illiterate and innumerate, the single mother, those on short-term contracts, the remnants of the last vestiges of heavy industry, the ex-offender, the disabled, ethnic minorities and those who appear to be in danger of joining any of the above as a result of their location within their communities are all to be encompassed within the ‘at risk’ group. These are the classifications of those least likely to progress onto higher education and most likely to leave. Leathwood and O’Connell (2003) also write of these ‘new’ students as being representative of,
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The school curriculum and SATs in England: reforms since 2010

The school curriculum and SATs in England: reforms since 2010

The Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL) and the National Association of Head Teachers (NAHT) gave more mixed responses. ASCL welcomed the emphasis on English, maths and languages at primary level but criticised the Government for not ‘seizing the opportunity’ to slim down the curriculum and for failing to make clear at this stage what the proposals in respect of the secondary curriculum were likely to be. 16 NAHT welcomed what it saw as a ‘leaner’ science curriculum,

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Higher education funding in England

Higher education funding in England

The 2012 changes in university funding directly affect teaching rather than research. Plans were set out for each year to 2014-15 soon after the 2010 CSR was published. The earlier table shows that recurrent funding for research broadly maintained its cash value up to 2014-15. The 2013 Spending Round kept the total resource (recurrent) science budget for 2015-16, which includes funding for Research Councils and other areas, at the same cash level as earlier years. Total capital funding for science was increased, partially reversing earlier cuts. 16
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School funding pressures in England

School funding pressures in England

The average deficit amongst local authority maintained primary schools also increased over the observed period, from £72,042 to £107,962 (in cash terms – no adjustment made for inflation). There has been a widening in the variation between schools over this period, as shown in Figure 7. Each box represents the range between the lowest quartile of schools and the highest quartile, i.e. the middle 50 per cent of schools. The horizontal line in the middle of each box shows the median balance. In 2010-11, a quarter of local authority maintained primary schools (including all of those in deficit) had a balance below £27,594, while a quarter had a balance above £86,626. By 2016-17, the bottom quartile had not changed much, now lying at £31,527. However, the top quartile had increased significantly – a quarter of schools now had a surplus of over £127,630 (again, all figures are in cash terms).
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06154, 5 April 2017: 16-19 Bursaries for further education in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06154, 5 April 2017: 16-19 Bursaries for further education in England

Twelve thousand students, those in care, care leavers and those receiving income support, including the severely disabled, should in future all receive an annual bursary of £1,200 if they stay on in education—more every year than they ever received under EMA. I also propose that those most in need who are currently in receipt of EMA be protected. All young people who began courses in 2009-10 and who were told that they should receive EMA will still receive their weekly payments. Young people who started courses in the 2010-11 academic year and received the maximum weekly payment of £30 should now receive weekly payments of at least £20 until the end of the next academic year.
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16-19 education funding : trends and implications. May 2019

16-19 education funding : trends and implications. May 2019

Students are receiving fewer learning hours today than in 2012/13, especially after a sharp decline in academic qualifications after the decoupling of AS and A levels, which was not compensated with increases in other forms of education or training. This is concerning as upper secondary curriculum in England is narrow compared to international top performers, and as England is one of the few countries in the OECD where young people have lower basic skills than any other age group. Wages in the sector have decreased following falls in funding. This is particularly true for further education colleges, where salaries where already lower than in schools but have seen an additional eight per cent reduction. The fall seems to have been milder in sixth form colleges.
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Changes to 16-19 education funding

Changes to 16-19 education funding

From April 2010, following the abolition of the Learning and Skills Council, England’s colleges will be funded by local authorities for the education and training they provide to 16-19 year olds. The Young People’s Learning Agency will assist local authorities with this task, and will publish guidance in the form of a National Commissioning Framework, setting out the core requirements for planning, commissioning, procuring, funding and accountability of education and training for 16-19 year olds. John Landeryou, Director, Further Education, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills said that the current arrangements in England did enable further education learners to cross the border if that was more convenient for them or if they wanted to attend a specialist course, and that although new guidance was being prepared, the intention was to continue to enable that freedom of movement.
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House of Commons: Debate pack: Number CDP-2017-0156, 06 September 2017: 16 to 19 Education Funding

House of Commons: Debate pack: Number CDP-2017-0156, 06 September 2017: 16 to 19 Education Funding

The 16-19 budget set for each financial year is a forecast of anticipated spend. Actual spend varies from this because it is based on set funding rates per student. If actual student numbers are lower than forecast, the department works in conjunction with the Treasury to try to reallocate any underspends to other priorities in a way that maximises value for money. This could include a proposal to redeploy the funding to the next financial year. If alternative value for money activities cannot be identified, the funding is returned to the Treasury to support the overall fiscal position.
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School funding reform in England from 2018-19 : implementation of the national funding formula

School funding reform in England from 2018-19 : implementation of the national funding formula

sufficiency of the school funding ‘pot’, given cumulative cost pressures on schools, inflation and rising pupil numbers. Many have also pointed out that any future protections or cash increases under the reformed school funding system from 2018-19 do not provide redress for funding pressures schools have already absorbed. The Government accepts schools are facing cost pressures, but argues that overall funding for the education budget has increased, and will continue to increase; also, it says it is supporting schools to operate more efficiently.
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Higher Education funding in England: past, present and options for the future: IFS Briefing Note BN211

Higher Education funding in England: past, present and options for the future: IFS Briefing Note BN211

Note: All figures are given in 2017 prices, in net present value terms using the government discount rate of RPI + 0.7%. These figures apply to young full-time English-domiciled students studying at the 90 largest universities in England starting in 2017–18. Cohort of students is held constant across systems. We assume that all students taking out loans do so for the full amount to which they are entitled, that there is no dropout from university, that graduates repay according to the repayment schedule and that they have low unearned income. This assumes cohort size of 365,700 based on 2015–16 Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) estimates of English-domiciled first-year full-time undergraduates. We assume 10% non-take-up of loans, approximately in line with Student Loans Company (SLC) data on loan uptake. * When originally published this number did not include the £75m in grants for non-borrowers, this has since been added.
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Implementation of the national funding formula for schools in England

Implementation of the national funding formula for schools in England

[I]it is very much scaremongering. The Department for Education’s published formula illustrations show, as my hon. Friend says, that his Shropshire schools are gaining an additional £3.7 million by 2019-20, of which £2.6 million will be allocated in 2018-19. The websites he mentions [including School Cuts] are fundamentally misleading, and their claims are based on flawed calculations. They say that money to schools is being cut when it is increasing, and they say that teacher numbers will go down although they are going to go up. Of course, that is all contrary to the Leader of the Opposition’s claims last week, but the national funding formula provides cash gains for every school. 16
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