Top PDF A Foundation Course in Reading German

A Foundation Course in Reading German

A Foundation Course in Reading German

German nouns use a very wide range of plural forms, much wider than the range of the English "exceptions" given above. And what’s more fundamentally disturbing to our English habit of relying on noun spellings is the fact that German nouns change their spelling for more reasons than just their singular or plural status. (You’ll learn about other reasons for noun spelling changes in upcoming units). So the bottom line for readers of German is that you cannot simply rely on a noun’s spelling. Instead you must learn to pay attention to the context of the noun, for example the particular form of the noun’s article, whether a verb is conjugated for a singular or plural subject, etc. By Unit 4 of this course you will have learned all the possible clues you can look for to determine whether a noun is singular or plural. You will also discover that it is faster and easier to "read" the surrounding articles and word endings that modify a noun (since there are only a handful of articles and endings to learn) than it is to consult your dictionary for every single noun to check what the noun’s spelling might be telling you. Use your dictionary for this purpose only as a last resort, because that is the source most likely to mislead you.
Show more

151 Read more

Course Highlights. Students need college level writing, reading, computation, analytical and communication skills to be able to complete this course.

Course Highlights. Students need college level writing, reading, computation, analytical and communication skills to be able to complete this course.

Course Sequence: This course is an elective in the BBA program. The foundation and core finance and general business courses provide prerequisite knowledge for students who are taking this course. Students should have taken all core courses and the foundation finance, economics, and accounting courses before enrolling in this course.

5 Read more

Reading aloud as intangible cultural heritage: A German initiative to support literacy, reading and libraries worldwide

Reading aloud as intangible cultural heritage: A German initiative to support literacy, reading and libraries worldwide

Is reading aloud in danger? Does it need to be saved from extinction? Have we as librarians done enough to promote reading aloud in libraries and schools, organizing reading competitions and World Reading Day? However, reading aloud is not only about children nor is it only a local, regional, or national cultural technique worth protecting. It is universal. Reading aloud ought to be promoted as common cultural heritage on the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) list. Reading aloud relies on and creates, a specific social situation: Think of the physical closeness and emotional bond that develop as a parent reads to a child at bedtime, the special form of attention given to a patient or an elderly person by a reading visitor, and the group spirit and enchantment created by a teacher reading to pupils in class or around the toasty evening campfire. Every type of reading aloud has its own atmospheric charm that people share which reflects the place or the time of day, the acoustics of the room, and the individuality of voice and body language. Works of world literature also have much to tell us about reading aloud, including its erotic quality. Reading aloud is truly a cultural technique relevant in all phases of human existence. Hence, it fulfills all the criteria of the UNESCO list. Reading aloud has to be learned individually and passed on personally. It cannot be preserved or reproduced digitally, as it is traditional, contemporary and living all at the same time. Reading aloud is community-based and it has a vibrant social aspect because it needs both, a reader and a listener. This paper discusses a joint initiative together with the DBV (German Library Association) and Stiftung Lesen (German reading foundation).
Show more

5 Read more

Additional Qualification Course Guideline Reading, Specialist

Additional Qualification Course Guideline Reading, Specialist

A commitment to a clear vision of what it means to be a teacher is at the core of teacher professionalism. The Ethical Standards for the Teaching Profession and the Standards of Practice for the Teaching Profession (Appendix 1) provide the focus for ongoing professional learning and are the foundation for the development of the Additional Qualification course: Reading Specialist. In addition, the Professional Learning Framework for the Teaching Profession is underpinned by the standards, articulates the principles on which effective teacher learning is based and

13 Read more

US Navy Training Course   Blueprint Reading and Sketching pdf

US Navy Training Course Blueprint Reading and Sketching pdf

The angled arrows marked “A” in figure 7-11 indicate the location of the cutting plane for the sections. To help you understand the importance of wall sections to the craftsmen who will do the actual building, look at the left wall section in figure 7-15 marked “masonry construction.” Starting at the bottom, you learn that the footing will be concrete, 1 foot 8 inches wide and 10 inches high. The vertical distance to the bottom of the footing below FIN GRADE (finished grade, or the level of the finished earth surface around the house) varies-meaning that it will depend on the soil-bearing capacity at the particular site. The foundation wall will consist of 12-inch concrete masonry units (CMU) centered on the footing. Twelve-inch blocks will extend up to an unspecified distance below grade, where a 4-inch brick facing (dimension indicated in the mid-wall section) begins. Above the line of the bottom of the facing, it is obvious that 8-inch instead of 12-inch blocks will be used in the foundation wall.
Show more

200 Read more

Evaluating Answers to Reading Comprehension Questions in Context: Results for German and the Role of Information Structure

Evaluating Answers to Reading Comprehension Questions in Context: Results for German and the Role of Information Structure

suggesting that the course setting and task type effec- tively constrains the degree of syntactic and lexical variation in the student answers. This includes the stage of the learners in this foreign language teaching setting, which limits their exposure to linguistic con- structions, as well as the presence of explicit reading texts that the questions are about, which may lead learners to use the lexical material provided instead of rephrasing content in other words. We intend to ex- plore these issues in our future work to obtain a more explicit picture of the contextual and task properties involved.
Show more

9 Read more

The effect of reading aloud daily - differential effects of reading to native-born German and Turkish-origin immigrant children

The effect of reading aloud daily - differential effects of reading to native-born German and Turkish-origin immigrant children

In the empirical analyses, we use data of the Project “Preschool Education and Educational Careers among Migrant Children” which is carried out at the Mannheim Centre for European Social Research at the University of Mannheim (Germany). The project is funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). We selected German and Turkish-origin families with a three to four year-old child randomly from resident-registration offices in 30 cities and communities of a local region in South-West Germany. All families with at least one parent or grandparent of the child born in Turkey are considered as having a Turkish immigration background. We use this rather broad definition of immigrant background because research finds that in Germany, even third-generation immigrant children have lower language skills at preschool age than native children (Becker, 2011). A computer-assisted personal interview (CAPI) was conducted with the child's primary caregiver. The interview comprised questions concerning the child's family activities, preschool attendance, the social and cultural capital of the parents, demography of the family members, as well as specific questions concerning the migration history and background of immigrant families. After the interview, the standardized developmental test “Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children” (K-ABC) was conducted with the child (German version, see Melchers & Preuß, 2001). The test includes the subtest “expressive vocabulary” which is a direct adaptation of the “picture vocabulary” subtest of the Stanford-BINET. Because the interviewers were bilingual, it was possible to administer both the interview and the K-ABC instructions in either German or Turkish, depending on the preferred language of the families. The project is designed as a panel study. We use data from the first and second wave. Overall, 1283 families participated in the first wave in 2007. In 2008, the second wave was conducted. Panel attrition was about 8 percent resulting in a total number of 1177 families in the second wave. After excluding all families with an immigration background other than Turkish and deleting cases with missing values on variables included in the statistical models listwise, 1030 families, including 499 native German families (48.4 percent) and 531 Turkish immigrant families (51.6 percent), remain for our analysis of the first wave. In the second wave, 997 families remain.
Show more

19 Read more

German Introductory Course

German Introductory Course

The Introductory course comprises the first two hours of the Foundation (8-hour) course. Both courses are designed for complete beginners. They make no assumption of a knowledge of any language other than English. They will give the beginner a practical and functional use of the spoken language. They are also appropriate for anyone who has studied a language before, but has forgotten much of it or does not have confidence in speaking. The Advanced Course follows on from the Foundation Course and expands on structures touched on in the earlier course to improve your understanding and mastery of complex language.
Show more

32 Read more

Mandarin Chinese. Foundation Course

Mandarin Chinese. Foundation Course

The classroom situation on the recording lets you learn with others. You enjoy their success, and you learn from their mistakes. The students on the recordings are not reading from scripts and they have received no additional instruction or preparation – just the guidance you hear on the recording. You, as the learner, become the third student and participate actively in the class. A very important part of the Michel Thomas Method is that full responsibility for your learning lies with the teacher, not with you, the pupil. This helps to ensure that you can relax, and feel confident, so allowing you to learn effectively.
Show more

32 Read more

The booklet "Genetically modified crops" published from the German Research Foundation, does not meet the given claim

The booklet "Genetically modified crops" published from the German Research Foundation, does not meet the given claim

d) Der horizontale Gentransfer von einem Nahrungs- mittel aus einer genveränderten Pfl anze direkt auf eine lebende Zelle oder einen Organismus ist zwischen gleichen und verschiedenen S[r]

12 Read more

SECOND READING SPEECH. Jim Bacon Foundation (Winding-Up) Bill 2013

SECOND READING SPEECH. Jim Bacon Foundation (Winding-Up) Bill 2013

In recent times it has been difficult for the Foundation to harness financial support and donations. There are not the resources within the Foundation available to conduct major fund raising appeals or to develop and deliver contemporary marketing and promotions strategies.

8 Read more

TEACHER ENGAGEMENT WITH ACADEMIC READING IN A POST-SERVICE TESOL COURSE

TEACHER ENGAGEMENT WITH ACADEMIC READING IN A POST-SERVICE TESOL COURSE

Parrott and Cherry’s (2011) study suggests approaches to academic reading that can provide the support Le Fevre contends is necessary. Parrott and Cherry sought ways to engage learners with deep reading (requiring both individual and collaborative settings). In their work with social science students, they had found significant difficulties in getting their students “to complete the readings and, beyond that, having them engage in deep reading” (p. 354). They concluded that this was because groups were often poorly organised. Parrott and Cherry set conditions for group work: students were assigned small groups and a set of rotating group roles (discussion leader, passage master, devil’s advocate, creative connector, and reporter). Interestingly, one of the roles, that of devil’s advocate, requires students to challenge the reading’s ideas, and another requires developing connections to other academic readings and existing educational beliefs and wider policy. Students met with their groups each week. Before the group meeting, they were to complete the reading and be prepared to contribute to the group in their given role. The students reported that:
Show more

11 Read more

Effects of the dyslexic version of the typewriting course TypeTopia on reading skills of dyslexic children

Effects of the dyslexic version of the typewriting course TypeTopia on reading skills of dyslexic children

trained on their reflexes in the retrieving speed of recognition of both letters and words. This is congruent with the arguments of Bosch et al. (1995) that children do have accurate decoding skills, but find it difficult to apply the knowledge fast and efficiently. If the typewriting course trained the reaction speed of the letters and words, this probably would have led to a faster recognition time in both typewriting and reading resulting in a higher word reading and naming speed. The results of this study emphasize the same theory; the results of letter naming and monosyllabic word reading show no significant differences between both groups, probably because the children have the knowledge of recognizing them easily. The word reading tests EMT-B and De Klepel on the other hand, did show a significant difference, probably because they could apply their knowledge faster and with more accuracy. So, with the results of this study it can be expected that the children perhaps need more practice with the knowledge they already have and the use of a typewriting course could be an option.
Show more

64 Read more

Raynham Primary School Policies. Reading Policy Foundation & Key stage 0ne

Raynham Primary School Policies. Reading Policy Foundation & Key stage 0ne

Different approaches are used to meet the needs of various ability groups e.g. organisation of pupils, selection of texts, use of additional adults, planning for differentiated outcomes, intervention programmes and boosters. This should allow children to be able to develop their own personalised reading.

8 Read more

Gianni Benzi Pharmacological Research Foundation. Key concepts and Course presentation

Gianni Benzi Pharmacological Research Foundation. Key concepts and Course presentation

While supporting pharmacological research, the Foundation is especially committed to provide educational support and to set up activities in the Regulatory Science sector having as reference the European dimension as the natural framework to favoring innovation, to defining common rules and adequate procedures, to ensuring equality of access to efficacious and safe tools and medicinals to all European citizens. The Foresight Training Courses, annually organized by the Gianni Benzi Pharmacological Research Foundation are short courses for researchers and experts in the field of Regulatory Sciences that aim at contributing to satisfy the increasing knowledge needs of the sector.
Show more

16 Read more

Course Specification. Level Foundation Intermediate Advanced Pre-requisites None

Course Specification. Level Foundation Intermediate Advanced Pre-requisites None

1 Asbestos and other Fibrous Materials 10% 2 Health Hazards and Exposure Limits 10% 3 Asbestos in Buildings and Conducting Surveys 25% 4 Asbestos Remediation and Assessment Pri[r]

8 Read more

The impact of a critical reading course in the Turkish High School context

The impact of a critical reading course in the Turkish High School context

Sharing the principles of Critical Language social aspect of Awareness, this study seeks to find out the impact of a critical reading course in the Turkish Anatolian High School context.[r]

329 Read more

Cross Cultural Literary Translation Teaching in Course of “Home Reading”

Cross Cultural Literary Translation Teaching in Course of “Home Reading”

Thus, we included literary translation study into the course of Home Reading. As a result we expected a cultural-linguistic personality of the translator to reach both the literary-adequate level of language proficiency and a creative level of cultural proficiency. The former means its application for the reconstruction and interpretation of a foreign culture text, as well as for creating new texts. The latter is of utmost importance for translators, since it means that the translator acts as the co- creator, artist, co-author of spiritual culture products.
Show more

6 Read more

Where knowledge and challenge meet. Foundation Year (Preparatory Course) WELCOME PACKAGE

Where knowledge and challenge meet. Foundation Year (Preparatory Course) WELCOME PACKAGE

The course is organized for students who require additional instruction of review in sciences and languages to prepare them to take the entrance examination for admission into the Medical, Pharmacy and Dentistry Program of the University. It is important to know that completion of the Foundation Year does not imply or assure admission or dispense with the entrance examination for the degree programs at the University of Szeged.

12 Read more

Schelling’s Nothingness—the Figuration of the Death Drive in German Idealism in Žižek’s reading of Ages of the World

Schelling’s Nothingness—the Figuration of the Death Drive in German Idealism in Žižek’s reading of Ages of the World

phenomenon; it is not the mysterious object of negative theology, for example. The historical decay of the metaphysical concept of nothingness in favor of its alternative materialist sense occurs decisively along the trajectory of German Idealism that runs from Kant’s transcendental idealism to Marx’s historical materialism, enacting the transition from traditional onto-theology to modern historicism. In particular, Žižek emphasizes the thought of F.W.J. Schelling as a moment that decisively anticipates the position of Žižek’s updated version of dialectical materialism towards negation. Žižek’s interpretation of Schelling’s philosophy focuses on his reading of the latter’s Ages of the World (1813, second draft) as developed in his essay The Abyss of Freedom (1997), published as a preface to a contemporary English translation of Schelling’s text. (Schelling & Žižek 1997)
Show more

20 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...