Top PDF A Survey of Makerspaces in Academic Libraries

A Survey of Makerspaces in Academic Libraries

A Survey of Makerspaces in Academic Libraries

Approximately 83 percent of respondents indicated that their library makerspace offered instruction on 3D printing. Other courses workshop topics included: sound/video editing, introduction to Arduino, electronics prototyping, origami, and SketchUp. One respondent indicated that their library’s makerspace offered students courses for credit. The for- credit course, called “Makerbots and Mashups,” “introduces all the tools to the students through a series of guided lessons and projects culminating in a final project that incorporates several different tools.” It appears to be much less common for academic library makerspaces to offer courses for credit. “Other” responses included: online
Show more

26 Read more

Writing Center and Library Collaboration: A Telephone Survey of Academic Libraries

Writing Center and Library Collaboration: A Telephone Survey of Academic Libraries

! Library instructors often experience situations where, in their effort to help students with research, keyword searching, and citations, they have to address critical thinking skills that may be the province of other campus agents, such as writing center mentors. Bibliographic instruction involves the imparting of critical thinking skills that are directly akin to the writing process itself, in constructing, phrasing, and evaluating topics, as well as executing the research process in formulating, writing, and citing the intellectual product. Due to the greatly interrelated and dynamic nature of the research process itself, such overlap is unavoidable. However, the literature also suggests that writing and information literacy are often set against each other: writing is viewed as a creative and dynamic enterprise and information literacy, as a technology-driven task. The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which libraries and writing centers are collaborating in the academic world today. The main question addressed in this paper, therefore is: what is the current relationship between writing centers and libraries?
Show more

46 Read more

Academic Libraries' Stance toward the Future

Academic Libraries' Stance toward the Future

In developing such new practices, there is more research that could be usefully undertaken. This paper is just a snapshot of views, taken at one time, with a preponderance of respondents from the UK. Since the interviews were based on a relatively small, broad sample, more data would be needed to identify the frequency with which particular views of the future are held in the wider population, e.g. with differences between those in research intensive institutions and others. It would also be fascinating to see if there are national differences in attitudes to the future, and how views change over time. The analysis of the survey conducted in the study did not find major differences in response by age, but the number of those from younger age groups was small. Because most of the interviewee participants were quite senior, and consequently often in their middle-age, their responses may reflect personal time horizons. Several participants commented on their difficulty in considering the future beyond their own retirement. It would be interesting to see if younger professionals had a different vision of how to relate to the future. It would also be useful to conduct similar studies to the present one among other information professions, and professions beyond the sector, to examine differing concepts of the future as a salient aspect of professional identity.
Show more

32 Read more

The Role of Academic Libraries in Research Data Management: A Case in Ghanaian University Libraries

The Role of Academic Libraries in Research Data Management: A Case in Ghanaian University Libraries

Seeking information is of the great key for both researchers and academic li- brarians and for that matter getting data plays a key role. The act of sharing, preserving, collecting, disseminating, and managing of data with respect to research data is of the essence in our current system of retrieving informa- tion. This has been made possible by the collaboration with information communication and technology for both researchers and academic librarians. Scholars are now producing, disseminating and storing digital data in much larger volume than the text. Management of research data is a major chal- lenge for many universities in Ghana. In case, having access to such data is really difficult because some data are not stored in libraries. The study reveals that some academic libraries are beginning to provide frameworks for these services with some degree of success as policies are being formulated. Also, infrastructures are being set up, and library staff trained, and awareness and advocacy campaigns held with academic staff and researchers. The study seeks to explore academic librarians’ perceptions of their roles and involve- ment in RDM support services. In view of that, the researchers used the qua- litative method and gathered data using semi-structured interviews. Thematic analysis method was used to analyze the data collected. A sample of 116 libra- rians was targeted for the survey in the data collection process. Out of one hundred and sixteen (116), only eighty-one (81) agreed to participate. The findings reveal that academic libraries in Ghana need to improve their tech- nical skills and competency sets through training and other capacity building program. Based on the findings recommendations were also provided which can help major Ghanaian academic libraries to improve.
Show more

16 Read more

Accessibility And Academic Libraries: A Comparative Case Study

Accessibility And Academic Libraries: A Comparative Case Study

The majority of publications in the field relate to practitioner experience, are based in the everyday realities of providing on-the-ground library services, or are empirical studies about adaptive technologies or website testing, such as those using the now- defunct Bobby testing software (Comeaux & Schmetzke, 2013; Coonin, 2002). Other studies have examined whether websites comply with Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) (Billingham, 2014; Liu, Bielefield, & McKay, 2017; Maatta Smith, 2014; Oud, 2012) or the accessibility of OPACs or databases (Axtell & Dixon, 2002; Byerley & Chambers, 2002). Some publications provide a positive overview of how libraries are faring with providing accessible services. Lewis (2013) suggests that libraries can provide fully accessible services, but that there is “a lack of awareness of the user, lack of comfort level of the staff, and lack of inclusive programming” (p. 232). Thus, simply remedying these issues will fix the problem. Willis (2012), in a survey of academic health sciences library services suggests that “budgets are being squeezed each year, and often building updates are not the responsibility of the library but the institution. Despite this hardship, libraries are meeting minimum standards” (p. 94). Pinder (2005) suggests that “we should all be aiming for best practice to make life as successful as possible for students. Many would argue that librarians, by their nature, would have done this anyway” (p. 471).
Show more

416 Read more

Computer Facilities and Manpower Resources in First Grade College Libraries of Chitradurga District: A Survey

Computer Facilities and Manpower Resources in First Grade College Libraries of Chitradurga District: A Survey

Bansal (2010) in his research paper which deals with emerging ICT (Information and Communication Technology) to modernize college libraries, pointed out various applications of ICT in library services to meet users need in present scenario. Use of ICT is essential to modernize the libraries. He stated very clearly that ICT is beneficial for mechanization of traditional libraries and all their functions. ICT also helps in storing, preserving, ret rivaling and disseminating information in economical ways to the users. He concluded his paper suggesting that applications of ICT in college and academic libraries is growing fast and ICT only helps in removing the barriers of information handling. Modernization of libraries is must and for this purpose ICT is the best tool.
Show more

6 Read more

E-Books in academic libraries

E-Books in academic libraries

development of e-books from a by-product of the Hypertext community to web-delivered packaged information. At this point, a simple four-dimensional definition of e-books is introduced to facilitate discussion, these four main dimensions being: content, format, purpose and use. The role of e-books in a digital library is then discussed and a number of possible scenarios described. Education and e-learning are explored as offering a promising environment within which e-books could have a positive impact. The approaches to e-books of academic librarians, authors, publishers and readers are considered, using the results of a recent survey commissioned by the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC). The paper then concludes with a discussion on how e-books could become more widely used and have a positive impact on different type of readers.
Show more

12 Read more

Information consulting: The key to success in academic libraries

Information consulting: The key to success in academic libraries

(November 1996): 32; Marta A. Davis & Kathleen M. Cook, “Implementing A Library Liaison Program: Personnel, Budget, and Training,” Collection Management 20 (1996): 157-165; Raghini S. Suresh, Cynthia C. Ryans, & Wei-Ping Zhang, “The Library-Faculty Connection: Starting A Liaison Programme In An Academic Setting,” Library Review 44 (1995): 7-13; Barbara F. Schloman, Roy S. Lilly, & Wendy Hu, “Targeting Liaison Activities: Use of a Faculty Survey in an Academic Research Library,” RQ 28 (Summer 1989): 496-505; Connie Wu, Michael Bowman, Judy Gardner, Robert G. Sewell, & Myoung Chung Wilson, “Effective Liaison Relationships In An Academic Library,” C&RL News (May 1994): 254, 303.
Show more

23 Read more

Bopape

Bopape

of Pretoria. The changing social and political environments in South Africa have created a lot of camplex and challenging opportunities for the management of human resources in most organizations. In library and information service organizations, managers have received little or no training in human resources management. In order to establish what the training and development needs of managers in academic libraries in performing human resource management activities and tasks are, a survey by means of a questionnaire based on the Graham and Mihal model was conducted, using six South African university libraries, from the Gauteng and Environs Library and Information consortium (GAELIC). The results of this study or research paper showed that most library managers in the selected academic libraries need training and development in human resource management activities and tasks. especially those related to utilization and development of staff. They need to know more about conducting performance appraisals, motivating staff, improving staff relations and delegating responsibilities. They also showed a need for training and development on activities and tasks related to managing labour and employment relations. This includes understanding employment legislation, communicating with employees, improving and maintaining good working conditions as well as maintaining discipline. Although few library managers indicated the need for training and development in tasks related to human resource planning, some indicated they need training and development in tasks related to human resource provision such as selecting and appointing suitable library employees. Programmes that address these needs must be developed in South Africa. The programmes must be designed to equip library managers with skills and competencies that will enable library managers to manage staff effectively.
Show more

10 Read more

A survey of consumer health reference services policies of academic medical school libraries and veterinary medical school libraries.

A survey of consumer health reference services policies of academic medical school libraries and veterinary medical school libraries.

In recent years, most academic health sciences libraries have opened their doors to the general public, as health consumers. However, the decision to extend services to this group has brought with it many technical and ethical questions, including how to allocate reference services and finite resources to various client groups, how much information to give to a health consumer with a reference question about a specific medical diagnosis or treatment, and whether or not to conduct mediated searches of electronic databases for members of the general public. Each library has found its own solution to these questions. But there has not been a means for the library directors and reference services managers to find out how their colleagues in other academic health sciences libraries are handling these issues, or to compare their reference services policies with those of libraries having similar demographics.
Show more

56 Read more

Academic health sciences libraries and affiliated hospitals: a conversation about licensing electronic resources

Academic health sciences libraries and affiliated hospitals: a conversation about licensing electronic resources

In the thirty-third (2011) and thirty-sixth (2014) editions, the Descriptive Statistics Survey asked about library services that were provided to physicians and other staff at the hospital. One answer choice was that the library provided access to electronic resources but no other library services [15, 18]. The question in these two editions did not include an option to indicate that the library provided electronic resources plus other services. Therefore, it was difficult to draw a conclusion about the extent to which libraries were providing electronic resources to affiliated hospitals. None of the AAHSL instruments included questions about licensing practices or the scope of the library’s online collections that were made available to affiliated hospitals.
Show more

11 Read more

Electronic reserve services at UNC-Chapel Hill: Faculty and student perceptions of personal control, access, and service quality.

Electronic reserve services at UNC-Chapel Hill: Faculty and student perceptions of personal control, access, and service quality.

Recent research in the area of electronic reserves has mostly focused on organization rather than usability. Many researchers, such as Hiller and Hiller (1999), reviewed e- reserves processing workflow; he pointed out that processing time increased for staff compared with traditional reserves. Others, such as Bale (2001), discussed the option of library e-reserves processors using course management software instead of dedicated e- reserve packages, such as ERes, citing content security, existing tech support, cost, and positive response from students are reasons for this approach. Still, other researchers, such as Laskowski (2002) from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, discussed management of homegrown e-reserves systems. A large number of libraries are still using homegrown e-reserve solutions. This figure may be even higher in law libraries. In a 2002 survey of academic law libraries’ e-reserve operations, Cochran notes that, “The majority of the respondents (65%) indicated that home-grown Web-based systems are being implemented in law libraries… Innovative Interfaces, Inc. was a distant second at 13%, followed by ERes at 6%.”
Show more

92 Read more

Re-Vitalizing Library Space for 21st Century ...

Re-Vitalizing Library Space for 21st Century ...

The paper aim to highlight the modernization of information sources and services in current era and it put emphasis on revitalization of library space. It also discuss changing behavior of users towards information seeking after the development of ICT and Web2.0 To overcome changing requirement of new generation users it is necessary to re- engineering library space, sources and services. Review of various literatures has been done to indentified users requirement regarding library space and their changing demand towards information sources and services their changing expectation of new role of libraries is describe in this paper. Users survey have been done with the help of questionnaire to identify their requirement from libraries and interview of academic and public librarians have been done with the help of structured questionnaire. From the review of literature it is found that librarian’s need to revitalize library space. Today’s generation is more effected with socialize activities. So librarians need to give them space to socialize with their friends, peers and teachers. Where they can get all required information either in print or in digital form, they got expert help at this center; they want comfortable furniture to relax and learning, a small stationary shop where they get required stationary items with printing and scanning facilities and many others. Moreover, facilities to socialize with their peers and teachers are an added advantage. They can have fun with learning by conducting various learning programs in libraries.
Show more

10 Read more

Space priorities in academic law libraries.

Space priorities in academic law libraries.

Because the LAWLIBDIR-L listserv is a closed subscription list limited to academic directors, it was necessary to receive assistance in posting the survey to the list. To this end, I sought the assistance of Richard Danner, Director of the Law Library of the Duke University School of Law, who kindly agreed to assist me in drafting the questions and posting them to the list. Although the questions could have been posted to each individual director through email, without the need of assistance, the decision was made to post to the director’s listserv with the aid of a director for two primary reasons: The first reason was to add credibility to the survey, because I believed that directors would more likely respond to a survey their colleague believed warranted their attention than a survey submitted without notice from an individual student enrolled in a library science program. The second reason to submit to the listserv rather than to individuals was to encourage discussion and debate among the participants of the listserv and thus create additional data for collection.
Show more

58 Read more

1427.pdf

1427.pdf

The question remains if the other 42 academic institutions chose not to answer the survey because they did not hold congressional records, or perhaps they had no time or inclination to respond. During three weeks of email exchanges, there were a few people from the survey sample who indicated that they were not going to take it because their particular library did not house congressional records in its collections. After data collection and analysis had been completed for the study, I was not able to group responses by any type of institutional demographics because the answers were either unquantifiable or more varied than I had originally anticipated. For example, for the question pertaining to the number of full-time archivists that work in special collections, a participant answered that, "there are several different archives and special collections libraries in this university." For the question regarding the extent of records in linear feet, cubic feet, or a different metric, there were respondents who did not indicate any unit of measure, or responded with "unknown," "I do not know," or "none." I considered deleting these responses but decided not to in the end for the sake of preserving the rest of the data in the surveys.
Show more

48 Read more

Academic digital libraries of the future : an environment scan

Academic digital libraries of the future : an environment scan

Geoffrey Bilder (2006) has noted that “every day, Internet users are pelted with spam, hoaxes, urban legends, and scams—in other words, untrustworthy data. The Internet is largely without any infrastructure to help users identify authoritative and trustworthy content. Indeed, the history of the Internet is littered with examples of how technologists have underestimated the crucial role that social trust and authority play in communication.” In a print world we have a set of reference points which allow us to define trusted brands. If we give a book to a legal deposit library, we have a view that this ensures longevity; if a book is published by a major university press, we again will have a view on the likely authority of the author, on the quality of the research; if a book is held in the university library we will have a view on its likely relevance, and so on. Although we have not exploited the fact, libraries too are a trusted brand, seen as neutral, impartial, disinterested, and helpful. On the Internet a few brands are beginning to emerge as trusted, such as Google. It will be interesting to see whether this lasts. But trust in Google has already been harmed by its apparent kowtowing to Chinese government demands to ban access to websites and by the discovery that it makes information on usage available to US security services, irrespective of the country of the user (Globe and Mail, 2008). US librarians on the other hand are very publicly rebelling against the demands of the Patriot Act to make client information available to these self-same security services, risking jail in the process (Raw Story, 2006).
Show more

12 Read more

Efficiency of Kenya Libraries Information Services Consortium in Provision of E-Resources in Academic Libraries: Case of Laikipia University Library

Efficiency of Kenya Libraries Information Services Consortium in Provision of E-Resources in Academic Libraries: Case of Laikipia University Library

Resource sharing in libraries has been realized through establishment of library consortia. As pointed out by Fresnido, & Yap (2013), a library consortium fulfills certain needs that may be difficult to achieve when undertaken individually. Similarly, it brings about issues and challenges that libraries seldom experience as an independent entity. Online resources are normally accessed unlike print resources which are housed in a controlled environment. The aforementioned characteristic associated with electronic information resources entails development of ways and means of evaluating and monitoring their use while at the same time ensuring their overall accessibility to the library users.
Show more

94 Read more

Services of Harvard Library and the Enlightenments for Other Academic Libraries

Services of Harvard Library and the Enlightenments for Other Academic Libraries

Harvard Library was founded in 1638. At the beginning of its establishment, the library had only 400 books left by John Harvard. Harvard Library is considered as the oldest library in the United States, the largest university library and the largest academic library network in the world. Harvard Library ranks the third largest collection in the United States, after the Library of Congress and the Bos- ton Public Library. Its collections include nearly 20 million volumes, 400 million manuscripts, 10 million photographs, and one million maps. Its largest main li- brary is the Widener Library, which is the landmark building of Harvard Yard. Harvard Library is open to current Harvard affiliates, providing services for 6700 undergraduates, 14,500 postgraduates, 2400 faculty members and 10,400 scien- tific researchers including affiliated hospitals. Additionally, some resources and spaces are open to the public. According to the statistics in 2013, 733,890 books were circulated, 131,041 consultations answered, 20,000 researchers supported, 1700 introductory services held, 42,000 pictures viewed, 17,000 files downloaded, 47,000 documents scanned and transmitted, and 48,700 copies were interli- brary-borrowed. The cumulative opening time reached 55,176 hours for a total of readers of about 19,000.
Show more

13 Read more

[griffin] Master's Paper .pdf

[griffin] Master's Paper .pdf

The experience with the reference collection at Columbia University’s Law Library is a microcosm of an issue facing contemporary academic law librarians. Its reference collection occupied 225 linear feet of space, with only 3 linear feet of open space. 1 In law libraries generally, the lack of space is not limited to sub-collections such as the reference collection; it is felt throughout each library’s entire collection. Judith Wight, in a panel discussion at the 2010 American Association of Law Libraries, recounted a fellow law librarian’s comment that “All academic law libraries are being dismantled and losing their space.” 2 For years, academic law libraries have been running out of space to house their collections, either because their shelf space is nearing capacity or because law schools are reclaiming that space for their own programs.
Show more

42 Read more

Game on! Enhancing engagement, interaction and reflection in library workshops

Game on! Enhancing engagement, interaction and reflection in library workshops

The potential for using gamification in academic libraries in order to increase. student engagement and achievement[r]

15 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...