Top PDF Abstract Algebra: Theory and Applications

Abstract Algebra: Theory and Applications

Abstract Algebra: Theory and Applications

This text is intended for a one or two-semester undergraduate course in abstract algebra. Traditionally, these courses have covered the theoretical aspects of groups, rings, and fields. However, with the development of computing in the last several decades, applications that involve abstract algebra and discrete mathematics have become increasingly important, and many science, engineering, and computer science students are now electing to minor in mathematics. Though theory still occupies a central role in the subject of abstract algebra and no student should go through such a course without a good notion of what a proof is, the importance of applications such as coding theory and cryptography has grown significantly. Until recently most abstract algebra texts included few if any applications. However, one of the major problems in teaching an abstract algebra course is that for many students it is their first encounter with an environment that requires them to do rigorous proofs. Such students often find it hard to see the use of learning to prove theorems and propositions; applied examples help the instructor provide motivation.
Show more

343 Read more

Linear Algebra, Theory And Applications

Linear Algebra, Theory And Applications

The linear transformation, F in this context is called the deformation gradient and it describes the local deformation of the material. Thus it is possible to consider this deformation in terms of two processes, one which distorts the material and the other which just rotates it. It is the matrix U which is responsible for stretching and compressing. This is why in continuum mechanics, the stress is often taken to depend on U which is known in this context as the right Cauchy Green strain tensor. This process of writing a matrix as a product of two such matrices, one of which preserves distance and the other which distorts is also important in applications to geometric measure theory an interesting field of study in mathematics and to the study of quadratic forms which occur in many applications such as statistics. Here I am emphasizing the application to mechanics in which the eigenvectors of U determine the principle directions, those directions in which the material is stretched or compressed to the maximum extent.
Show more

503 Read more

ABSTRACT : Fuzzy logic controller (FLC) is the most widely used applications of fuzzy set theory. A Fuzzy Logic

ABSTRACT : Fuzzy logic controller (FLC) is the most widely used applications of fuzzy set theory. A Fuzzy Logic

ABSTRACT: Fuzzy logic controller (FLC) is the most widely used applications of fuzzy set theory. A Fuzzy Logic Controlled (FLC) buck-boost converter for solar energy-battery systems is analyzed. Solar Photovoltaic system has been increasingly playing a significant role in new energy systems. PV system has some disadvantages including low conversion efficiency and inconsistent values of output voltage due to irregular solar power which is caused by weather changes and shading effects. To address these disadvantages, DC-DC converters have been used to control PV output voltage and output power. Fuzzy logic controllers are non linear controllers which do not require exact information of mathematical model. Hybridization of the two controllers can be done to use the positive sides of both controllers to obtain better performance. The comparison of result obtained from fuzzy logic controller, fuzzy - PI hybrid controller, fuzzy - PID hybrid controller for DC-DC converter shows the benefit of the hybrid algorithm in terms of transient response. General design of a fuzzy logic controller based on MATLAB/Simulink is performed. The control system has been developed, analyzed, and validated by simulation study.
Show more

6 Read more

PROBLEM-SOLVING APPLICATIONS OF GROUP THEORY IN MODERN ALGEBRA: A STUDY

PROBLEM-SOLVING APPLICATIONS OF GROUP THEORY IN MODERN ALGEBRA: A STUDY

Groups are vital for modern algebra; Its basic structure can be found in many mathematical phenomena. Groups can be found in geometry, which represent phenomena such as symmetry and some types of transformations. Group theory has applications in physics, chemistry and computer science, and even puzzles such as the Rubik's Cube can be represented using group theory. In this extended summary, we give the definition of a group and several theorems in group theory. We also have several important examples of groups, namely the permutation group and the symmetry group, together with their applications.Group theory, in modern algebra, the study of groups, which are systems that comprise of a set of components and a binary operation that can be connected to two components of the set, which together fulfill certain adages.
Show more

6 Read more

Monetization : a theory and applications

Monetization : a theory and applications

In this paper I present a theory of monetization that introduces the concept of the caveat mutator burden, the minimum amount of information an actor must obtain about a potential exchange partner before feeling confident enough to carry out a transaction. This burden is thought to vary with the actors involved, the context of the exchange, and the types of valued objects or services exchanged. Moreover, and central to the thesis presented here, the caveat mutator burden is radically altered in subtle but important ways by the introduction of monetary instruments into the context of exchange. In monetary exchange, a portion of the trust that is required for the actor to feel confident in carrying out the exchange is invested in a social institution that guarantees the value of the money received or given rather than the exchange partner, and thus, is more likely to encourage such transactions in many conditions. And yet, it is shown here that contrary to the informal statements and implicit models of monetization in the literature, monetization is not the juggernaut it is made out to be. Some households in Nang Rong pay their laborers, some do not. Presuming that few non-household members ever truly work for free, the conclusion is that some households continue to have valid reasons for
Show more

214 Read more

Applications of representation theory

Applications of representation theory

Chapter 5 is devoted to our second application of representation theory of locally compact groups, namely, a generalization of Mackey's Intertwining Number Theorem for one dimensional re[r]

108 Read more

Elements of Abstract Group Theory

Elements of Abstract Group Theory

If, from a group G, we select a subset H of elements which themselves form a group under the same composition law, H is said to be a sub- group of G. According to this definition, the unit element { e } forms a subgroup of G, and G is a subgroup of itself. These are termed improper subgroups. The determination of proper subgroups is one of the cen- tral concerns of group theory. In physical applications, subgroups arise in the description of symmetry-breaking, where a term is added to a Hamiltonian or a Lagrangian which lowers the symmetry to a subgroup of the original symmetry operations.
Show more

19 Read more

Some Applications of Clifford Algebra in Geometry

Some Applications of Clifford Algebra in Geometry

The events that give the greatest impetus to the development of this algebra should be rela- tivistic quantum mechanics established by Dirac, i.e., the present Dirac equation of spinor[5]. The coefficient matrix γ µ of this equation is a concrete Clifford algebra. Further development of the theory of Clifford algebras is associated with a number of famous mathematicians and physicists: R. Lipschitz, T. Vahlen, E. Cartan, E. Witt, C. Chevalley, M. Riesz and others [6–8]. The first per- son to realize that Clifford algebra is a unified language in geometry and physics should be David Hestenes. He published “space-time algebra” in 1966 and has been working on the promotion of Clifford algebra in teaching and research[9].
Show more

23 Read more

Linear algebra and differential geometry on abstract Hilbert space

Linear algebra and differential geometry on abstract Hilbert space

Various integral transforms are known to be extremely useful in analysis and applications. One example is the Fourier transform in analysis and applied problems; another example is the Segal-Bargmann transform [1] in quantum theory. An important common prop- erty of integral transforms is that they relate various spaces of functions and various oper- ators on these spaces and allow one to “transplant” a problem from one space to another. Because of that, the problem at hand may become easier to solve. A somewhat similar situation arises when working with tensor equations in the finite-dimensional setting. Namely, by an appropriate choice of coordinates one can significantly simplify a given tensor equation. Although the analogy is obvious, an infinite-dimensional setting o ff ers a significantly larger variety of situations. In particular, by using the Segal-Bargmann transform, one can relate problems on spaces of ordinary or even generalized functions to problems on spaces of holomorphic functions.
Show more

35 Read more

Connel, E H   Elements of Abstract And Linear Algebra pdf

Connel, E H Elements of Abstract And Linear Algebra pdf

4) To omit as many topics as possible. This is a foundational course, not a topics course. If a topic is not used later, it should not be included. There are three good reasons for this. First, linear algebra has top priority. It is better to go forward and do more linear algebra than to stop and do more group and ring theory. Second, it is more important that students learn to organize and write proofs themselves than to cover more subject matter. Algebra is a perfect place to get started because there are many “easy” theorems to prove. There are many routine theorems stated here without proofs, and they may be considered as exercises for the students. Third, the material should be so fundamental that it be appropriate for students in the physical sciences and in computer science. Zillions of students take calculus and cookbook linear algebra, but few take abstract algebra courses. Something is wrong here, and one thing wrong is that the courses try to do too much group and ring theory and not enough matrix theory and linear algebra.
Show more

146 Read more

An Analysis Of Students’ Mathematical Reasoning Ability On Abstract Algebra Course

An Analysis Of Students’ Mathematical Reasoning Ability On Abstract Algebra Course

in teaching abstract algebra course is that many students considering it as relatively new experience dealing with an environment that requires them to do rigorous proofing. Similarly, [11], [6] asserted that several abilities must be mastered by students to achieve the goal of abstract algebra learning, one of which is the ability of mathematical reasoning. The reasoning is the thinking process that connects facts or concepts to draw a conclusion [12], [13], [14]. In other words, reasoning can be interpreted as a thinking process to draw conclusions or make a correct statement that has been known to be true. Similarly, [15], [16], emphasize that mathematical reasoning is active thinking that has certain characteristics in finding the truth. People tend to think with various way, structures, or orders in the real world and symbolic situations of objects. Therefore, mathematical proofing is a formal way of expressing certain types of reasoning. Another definition proposed by [17] ,[18], [19] that reasoning is five interrelated processes in mathematical thinking activities that are categorized as sense-making, conjecturing, convincing, reflecting, and generalizing. Sense-making is closely related to the ability of problem schemes development and represent the knowledge they have. Conjecturing refers to the activity in drawing a conclusion and a theory based on incomplete facts or in other words it is a strategy of completion, argumentation, and communication. Convincing describes the implementation of completion strategy based on the two previous processes. Reflecting contains an activity of re-evaluating those three processes that have been carried out. Based on the above opinion, it can be concluded that reasoning is a thinking activity to perceive conclusions or make a new statement that is correct based on relevant theories. The study from [20] divide indicators of mathematical reasoning ability into four, namely 1) drawing logical conclusions; 2) conjecturing and proofing; 3) giving explanations to the model, making patterns and making connections between facts or concepts; and 4) using the patterns relationships to make analysis, analogy or general conclusions. According to [21], [22] reasoning indicators of mathematics consist of 1) make calculations based on applicable mathematical formulas or rules; 2) draw general conclusions based on visible mathematical processes/concepts; 3) make estimation; and 4) draw conclusions based on the similarity of visible processes/mathematical concepts. Based on the above research, the indicators of mathematical reasoning abilities in this study are presented in Table 1 below.
Show more

6 Read more

The Classification of Semisimple Lie Algebra With Some Applications

The Classification of Semisimple Lie Algebra With Some Applications

He discovered the remarkable fact that complex semi simple groups form group schemes over Z , so that one can tensor them with any field to produce algebraic semi simple groups over that field. If the field is algebraically closed this procedure will yield essentially all semi simple algebraic groups. If the field is finite one will get new finite simple groups beyond those first studied by.Finally, the notion of a quantum group arose from the idea that quantum mechanics is a deformation of classical mechanics, namely, there is an essentially unique deformation of the Lie algebra of smooth functions on phase space with the Poisson Bracket. Given this point of view it is natural to ask whether the symmetry groups of classical geometry can also be deformed into interesting objects. In the 1980’s such a theory of deformations emerged, under the impulses of several groups of people. Since classical semi simple Lie algebras are classified by discrete data, they are rigid. So, in order to deform them one must enlarge the category, [14].
Show more

20 Read more

Using Divisor Function and Euler Product Function in Abstract Algebra Concepts

Using Divisor Function and Euler Product Function in Abstract Algebra Concepts

The theory of numbers is an area of mathematics which deals with the properties of whole and rational numbers. Analytic number theory is one of its branches, which involves study of arithmetical functions, their properties and the interrelationships that exist among these functions. In this paper I will introduce some of the three very important examples of arithmetical functions, as well as a concept of the possible operations we can use with them. There are four propositions which are mentioned in this paper and I have used the definitions of these arithmetical functions and some Lemmas which reflect their properties, in order to prove them.
Show more

6 Read more

MAJOR CLASSIFICATION OF GROUP THEORY IN MODERN ALGEBRA: A STUDY

MAJOR CLASSIFICATION OF GROUP THEORY IN MODERN ALGEBRA: A STUDY

[2]. Weber, K., & Larsen, S. (2008). Teaching and learning group theory. Making the Connection: Research and Teaching in Undergraduate Mathematics Education, (73), 139. [3]. Dubinsky, E. (Ed.) (1997). An investigation of students’ understanding of abstract algebra (binary operation, groups and subgropus) and The use of abstract structures to build other structures (through cosets, normality and quotient groups.) [Special Issue]. The Journal of Mathematical Behavior, 16(3).

8 Read more

Part of the Algebra Commons, Algebraic Geometry Commons, and the Theory and Algorithms Commons

Part of the Algebra Commons, Algebraic Geometry Commons, and the Theory and Algorithms Commons

Section 3 contains many important results and definitions which will be used frequently throughout our discussion of Gr¨ obner bases and Buchberger’s Algorithm in Section 5. Here we discuss Buchberger’s Algorithm and Buchberger’s Criterion and examine them in depth to verify their termination. We also consider the Hilbert Basis Theorem, and an equivalent theorem, the Ascending Chain Condition. Prior to this we discuss the division algorithm as it is extended to the polynomial ring k[x 1 , . . . , x n ] in section 4. We conclude by considering a few applications of Gr¨ obner

98 Read more

Proof diagrams and term rewriting with applications to computational algebra

Proof diagrams and term rewriting with applications to computational algebra

‘essential’ equations and mles are generated. The first of these questions can be addressed by looking at critical pair criteria. These criteria preclude the generation of certain crit­ ical pairs which are provably redundant. If these equations had been generated, then the potentially costly process of normalisation and deletion would have to occur. Of course a critical pair criterion could make a c-completion procedure more inefficient. The costliness of the normalisation and deletion process has to be measured against the costliness of ap­ plying the criterion. It can also be seen that, even though the equations which are precluded are redundant, they may be applied in an intermediate stage of deriving one of the useful equations or rewrite mles. This section will investigate how critical pair criteria fit into the theory of the inference system XC.
Show more

167 Read more

Choice, extension, conservation. From transfinite to finite proof methods in abstract algebra

Choice, extension, conservation. From transfinite to finite proof methods in abstract algebra

Chapter 2 is based on joint work with Schuster [225]. This chapter has experimental charac- ter: by analogy, we generalize a concept of extension narrower than simple containment from the theory of quasi-orders, where this is common and indeed inevitable, to an abstract ideal theory for single-conclusion entailment relations; the ideals are the subsets saturated with respect to the corresponding algebraic closure operators. A proof pattern called Zorn Scheme that over constructive set theory derives from Raoult’s principle of Open Induction (Section 2.2.2) then prompts variants of Lindenbaum’s Lemma in Section 2.3.2, and helps to describe the intersection of all complete ideals above a given ideal in a computationally meaningful way. To this end in Section 2.3.3 we carry over from commutative ring theory a point-free version of the Jacobson radical, which moreover prompts a syntactical counter- part of Lindenbaum’s Lemma. In Section 2.4, our results turn out to have applications in commutative algebra, lattice theory, formal logic and order theory; the running example is in fact the deducibility relative to intuitionistic and classical logic. In Section 2.5 we finally relate all this to multi-conclusion entailment relations, which thus leads over to the following chapter.
Show more

200 Read more

Research on Boolean Algebra to Switching Theory

Research on Boolean Algebra to Switching Theory

The latter feature is actually the foundation for engineering applications of the Boolean algebra. Boole also discussed probability theory, however, other logic parts are mainly the same. The underlying idea of his work was to reduce the logical thought to solving of equations. The algebraic operations have been defined to correspond to the basic activities while reasoning. In terms of these operations Boole formulated in an algebraic structure that shares essential properties of both set operations and logic operations. The work was done independently of other works by logicians and mathematicians at that time. For instance, the results by Augustus De Morgan were not used, since Boole did not consider conjunction and disjunction as a pair of dual operations.The approach followed by Boole and his point of view to the subject is possibly best described by himself.
Show more

7 Read more

PP 2014 22: 
  Generalized algebra valued models of set theory

PP 2014 22: Generalized algebra valued models of set theory

Grayson, R. J. (1979). Heyting-valued models for intuitionistic set theory. In Fourman, M. P., Mulvey, C. J., & Scott, D. S., editors, Applications of sheaves, Proceedings of the Research Symposium on Applications of Sheaf Theory to Logic, Algebra and Analysis held at the University of Durham, Durham, July 9–21, 1977, Volume 753 of Lecture Notes in Mathematics, pp. 402–414. Springer-Verlag. Libert, T. (2005). Models for paraconsistent set theory. Journal of Applied

16 Read more

Algebra in the Stone-\(\check{C}\)ech compactification: applications to topologies on groups

Algebra in the Stone-\(\check{C}\)ech compactification: applications to topologies on groups

Abstract. For every discrete group G, the Stone- Cech com- ˇ pactification βG of G has a natural structure of compact right topological semigroup. Assume that G is endowed with some left invariant topology ℑ and let τ be the set of all ultrafilters on G con- verging to the unit of G in ℑ. Then τ is a closed subsemigroup of βG. We survey the results clarifying the interplays between the al- gebraic properties of τ and the topological properties of (G, ℑ) and apply these results to solve some open problems in the topological group theory.

28 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...