Top PDF Academic performance of disadvantaged pupils in and out of London: an analysis

Academic performance of disadvantaged pupils in and out of London: an analysis

Academic performance of disadvantaged pupils in and out of London: an analysis

This report presents the findings of an analytical assessment of the London Effect – the observation that educational performance in London has been improving compared to the rest of England since the late 1990s, especially for economically deprived pupils. This analysis uses an alternative methodology to that seen in the current literature to investigate the London Effect, namely Propensity Score Matching. This technique is used to assess the attainment gap between London and the rest of England, which characterises the London Effect. The nature of the effect means that it is difficult to identify whether the London Effect is driven by demographic, socio-economic, geographical or other factors, and this analysis aims to shed new light on that. The analysis uses the National Pupil Database, covering Key Stage 2 and Key Stage 4 assessments over the academic years 2006/07 to 2014/15, looking at the educational performance of pupils in receipt of Free School Meals.
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Supporting the attainment of disadvantaged pupils: articulating success and good practice : Research report November 2015.

Supporting the attainment of disadvantaged pupils: articulating success and good practice : Research report November 2015.

disadvantaged pupils achieving five A*-C in GCSEs or equivalent qualifications including English and maths. This model explained 62.3 per cent of the variance in findings and confirmed the majority of results identified in the analysis using the CAPS attainment measure. Almost all of the same key characteristics were found to be strongly associated with more successful schools. However, using the five A*-C measure, although schools in London were more successful than schools in most of the rest of the country, the difference between schools in the North East and schools in London was not statistically significant (i.e. schools in both areas performed equally well). Sponsored academies were no longer more likely to be successful than schools maintained by the local authority. Finally, although the proportion of white British pupils was again associated with lower performance, there were some minor differences in the relationship between ethnic composition and attainment of disadvantaged pupils, with the proportion of Asian pupils no longer significantly correlated with higher attainment, and the proportion of
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Extent of Parental School Involvement on Pupils’ Academic Performance in Anambra State, Nigeria

Extent of Parental School Involvement on Pupils’ Academic Performance in Anambra State, Nigeria

The table shows that teachers and parents indicate that parents are involved in child’s home-school communication to a great extent. Data analysis of teachers indicated that parents to a low extent talk to teacher about disciplinary procedures; attend PTA meetings to talk about their wards learning and behavior. More so, Data analysis of parents indicate to a low extent that they talk to their wards’ teachers about preparing their wards for life after school; they are provided with information on how to assist their child with skills they need to improve. This means that teachers and parents disagreed on their ratings on items 8 and 10 while they agreed on their ratings on the remaining items. The cluster means of 2.58 and 2.62 of teachers and parents respectively indicated that parental involvement in child’s home- school communication on pupilsacademic performance is on a great extent. The standard
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Selective Comprehensives: Scotland: Access to top performing schools for disadvantaged pupils in Scotland

Selective Comprehensives: Scotland: Access to top performing schools for disadvantaged pupils in Scotland

In order to identify top performing schools, we ranked all state secondary schools according to their attainment outcomes. However, as Scotland does not have a headline accountability measure like other nations, in order to evaluate the relative performance of secondary schools in Scotland, we looked at the percentage of pupils who achieved varying numbers of SCQF level 5 qualifications within different grade ranges. The proportion who achieved at least 4 A to C grades in their SCQF level 5 qualifications between academic years S4 to S6 was chosen, in part as the average proportion of pupils who achieved these attainment outcomes was broadly similar to the average attainment measures in the other two nations. The top 70 schools, which is about a fifth of all secondary schools, were then selected based on this ranking.
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METHOD OF TEACHING SCIENCE AS A LIMITATION TO UNDERSTANDING  SCIENCE CONCEPTS BY PRIMARY SCHOOL PUPILS  AND ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE

METHOD OF TEACHING SCIENCE AS A LIMITATION TO UNDERSTANDING SCIENCE CONCEPTS BY PRIMARY SCHOOL PUPILS AND ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE

The method a teacher employs in the classroom matter a lot. For this can hinder or enhance pupils understanding of any subject .Science is a subject with complex concepts which may mean different things in the child’s language. The method a teacher uses in the class to communicate science concept can be a barrier to their understanding. This study therefore seeks to examine method of teaching as a barrier to understanding science concepts among primary six pupils in Cross River State, Nigeria. One hypothesis was raised and tested. Two instruments were used for data collection. They were, Method of teaching science questionnaire (MTSQ) and 50 item primary science achievement tests. One thousand, eight hundred and eighteen pupils out of sixty eight thousand two hundred and one pupils were randomly selected for the study. Data obtained was analyzed using independent t-test analysis at 0.05 level of significance. The result revealed that there is a significant relationship between method of teaching and pupils’ understanding of scientific concepts and academic performance. It is therefore recommended that teachers should use appropriate methods of teaching to communicate science concept to pupils.
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The influence of evaluation techniques used by teachers on pupils’ academic performance in elgeyo marakwet county, kenya

The influence of evaluation techniques used by teachers on pupils’ academic performance in elgeyo marakwet county, kenya

To help all students learn, teachers need several kinds of knowledge about learning. They need to think about what it means to learn different kinds of material for different purposes and how to decide which kinds of learning are most necessary in different contexts. Teachers must be able to identify the strengths and weaknesses of different learners and must have the knowledge to work with students who have specific learning disabilities or needs. Teachers need to know about curriculum resources and technologies to connect their students with sources of information and knowledge that allow them to explore ideas, acquire and synthesize information, and frame and solve problems. In addition, teachers need to know about collaboration – how to structure interactions among students so that more powerful shared learning can occur; how to collaborate with other teachers, and how to work with parents to learn more about their children and to shape supportive experiences at school and home (Shulman, 1992). Evaluation Techniques Used By Teachers and PupilsAcademic Performance As observed by Nevo (1986), Shiundu and Omulando (1992), evaluation is a vital concept in any education system. In fact, the success or failure of any programme in education may be attributed nearly entirely to the quality and quantity of evaluation done at the beginning of, and during the implementation of the programme. Evaluation has been conceived either as the assessment of the merit and worth of educational programmes (Guba and Lincoln, 1981; Glatthorn and Fox, 1996; Scriven, 1991) or as the acquisition and analysis of information on a given educational programme for the purpose of decision making (Nevo, 1986; Shiundu and Omulando, 1992). The focus of instructional evaluation continues to be on the progress of the individual pupil whether in terms of increased knowledge and understanding or in terms of the development of attitude and skill instructional evaluation is that in which one sees how far the learning experiences are producing the desired behaviour (Shiundu and Omulando, 1992, p. 199-200). Based on this argument, it goes without
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Influence of parents’ educational level on pupils’ academic performance in public primary schools in Nandi South Sub County, Kenya

Influence of parents’ educational level on pupils’ academic performance in public primary schools in Nandi South Sub County, Kenya

economic status is a definite background variable that represents a feature of the social structure economic background on the academic ed in developed countries. This paper specifically examines the influence of parents’ educational levels on the academic performance of their children in schools. The paper is based on a study whose purpose was to determine the influence of parents’ socio- economic factors on pupil’s academic performance in public primary schools in Nandi South Sub- County. The study adopted a survey design targeting population 1821 pupils and 528 teachers from 74 public primary schools. Simple random sampling technique was used to select22 public primary schools, 158 teachers and 273 class 8 parents. The instruments used for collection included 2 sets of a questionnaire, one for teachers and another for parents. Quantitative data was coded, entered and of Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS Version 20). Descriptive statistics percentages, frequencies, means and standard deviation together with inferential statistics; square analysis was also used. The study found out that educational level of a parent did not significantly influence the academic performance of pupils (p=.251). It was, therefore, recommended teacher engagement programmes to help teachers and parents rough which pupilsacademic performance can be improved. This will equip parents with necessary knowledge and skills to enable them play specific and fruitful
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Influence of Parent teacher Communication on Academic Performance of Pupils in Public Primary Schools in Ainabkoi Sub county, Kenya

Influence of Parent teacher Communication on Academic Performance of Pupils in Public Primary Schools in Ainabkoi Sub county, Kenya

The study employed questionnaires to collect data from pupils and interview schedule for the teachers’ data. Interviews allowed the authors to clarify and elaborate the purpose of the study to the respondents to enable them give useful information. According to Kothari [24], data analysis is the process of bringing order and meaning to raw information hence this study analyzed both quantitative and qualitative data. Data analysis for quantitative data was done by both descriptive statistics and inferential statistics in the form of frequencies, percentages, standard deviation, and chi square, to test the hypothesis. The significance tests were done at 95% confidence level. Qualitative data on the other hand was analyzed using the thematic framework. According to Benard [25] thematic framework is a way of organizing or defining history to identify and place sites, persons and events in context. In this study the focus was on identifying and describing both implicit and explicit ideas within the themes as stipulated in the study objective. Coding was used to represent themes and linked to raw data analysis. The results were presented in line with the obtained study
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Influence of Teacher Motivation to Academic Performance of Pupils in Primary Schools in Kenya

Influence of Teacher Motivation to Academic Performance of Pupils in Primary Schools in Kenya

Abstract This study investigated the influence of teacher motivation to the academic performance of pupils in primary schools in Nyamira South Sub-County. The population of study was 147 head teachers and 836 teachers in Nyamira South Sub-County. Stratified sampling was used to get a sample of 84 teachers and 15 head teachers .A mixed method design was adopted for this study that used qualitative and quantitative approaches in collecting and analyzing data concurrently. A questionnaire was used to collect data from the teachers while an interview schedule collected from head teachers. Quantitative data was analyzed using both descriptive and inferential statistics. The descriptive statistic was used to describe and summarize the data inform of frequencies and percentages. Pearson correlation analysis was used to establish the relationship between the independent and dependent variable with the aid of Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS). The correlation analysis established a positive but weak (r= .439; p=.000<.05 correlation between teacher motivation and pupils academic performance. Qualitative data from the interview was analyzed using thematic approach. Data was coded and themes analyzed as they emerged. Analyzed data were then merged for presentation and discussion. The study concluded that the teacher motivation had a significant influence to academic performance of standard eight pupils in K.C.P.E. The study recommended that teachers should be given better motivation in terms of salaries, letters of recommendations and promotions. The results obtained may help the government and the community to make necessary changes and improvements so as to improve the education performance in the sub county.
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The Disadvantaged: Parental Involvement at Home and Low School Performance

The Disadvantaged: Parental Involvement at Home and Low School Performance

strategy of involvement. Although these parents with a lower level of education claimed to be involved in various strategies of involvement at home to foster academic excellence in their child‟s education, they may not be successful in utilising the strategies effectively. Hence, the strength of their involvement asserted in their children‟s education then is questionable. This is an important issue because any parent could obviously state that they are highly involved in their child‟s education but a parent‟s credibility, attitude and behaviour towards the involvement may vary and need to be considered too. In other words, the amount and quality of help that is offered by the parents in this study vary in terms of degree of involvement and effectiveness. Thus, this study points out the importance of understanding and evaluating the strength of involvement of the parents in their child‟s education at home. In-depth interviews with the students have revealed some weaknesses on the part of the parent‟s credibility, attitude and behaviour in explaining their involvement in their child‟s education, specifically among low-performance students. The analysis from the in-depth interviews indicates that the students do not deny the involvement shown by their parents at home but the way they are involved in their child‟s education needs to be clarified as well. For example, it is clear that parents set time limits for their child‟s activities, including for studying, watching television and other personal activities. However, they fail to monitor their child‟s activities within the time limit given. Some of them are not aware that the time limit given is being misused by their child. There are cases where the children did not complete their homework within the time frame given. Also, they try to manage their homework earlier so that they could play or enjoy watching television. Most of the parents also seem to help their child with their homework but the parents do not guide them throughout the session. The parents do face difficulties in helping with their child‟s homework due to their own educational background. Furthermore, the parents also identified homework given by the school by asking their child if there is any homework but they do not go to the extent of looking into their
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'Bucking the trend' : what enables those who are disadvantaged in childhood to succeed later in life? : a report of research carried out by the Department of Economics, University of Surrey and the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economi

'Bucking the trend' : what enables those who are disadvantaged in childhood to succeed later in life? : a report of research carried out by the Department of Economics, University of Surrey and the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics on behalf of the Department for Work and Pensions

Table 5.4 explores the results for relationship between school social class mix and children’s opportunities to buck the trend. The descriptive analysis of these variables indicated a positive impact of the higher socio-economic background of peers. The first specification in Table 5.4 shows the marginal effects from the full model, by gender. There is a stark gender difference observable here: For males, having many skilled manual workers among your peers’ fathers has a positive impact, while for women the result is opposite; few peers from manual backgrounds is beneficial. Surprisingly, none of the other variables are significant in these specifications. The differing importance of the number of skilled manual fathers by gender could be indicative of the opportunities available for children in later life. If the area has a large number of skilled manual jobs, this is likely to be more beneficial for the prospects of men than women. It would be useful to look in more detail at this result, perhaps considering poor children’s later occupation. What does seem clear is that the results from probit models are less supportive of a strong story that going to school with children from high social class backgrounds has large benefits for poorer children.
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Effects of executive functions and academic emotions on pupils' academic performance in mathematics

Effects of executive functions and academic emotions on pupils' academic performance in mathematics

process through creating the manipulated experiences, giving time for exploration, discussing and examining the students' capabilities. The executive functions in children and its relation to mathematics were studied. It was found that there is a significant relationship between the updating and paying attention to the mathematics executive capabilities. Certainly the improve in working memory, response inhibition and flexibility; will lead to the major changes in upgrading the students' mathematical abilities. The findings of this study are consistent with the research results by H. J. Van den Heuvel et al. (2012), Roethlisberger et al. (2013), H. Clements et al.(2015), Kazemi and Seif (2010), and Narimani and Soleimani (2012 ).The results of the analysis based on structural equation modeling showed a relationship between the elementary school students' academic emotions and their mathematic academic performance. Emotions and feelings affect the environmental reactions; including the environmental – personality dimensions of the students which are present throughout their learning process and also their executive learning. The academic emotion is directly related to the educational activities or the educational outcomes. Therefore the emotions associated with the activities related to education are also considered as the educational emotions. The pleasure and joy of learning, the fatigue caused by teaching math, the frustration and failure due to the difficult mathematical tasks, are the examples of the emotions associated with the mathematics activities. The effects of emotion on learning and the development in mathematical problem solving get created by some emotional, cognitive, motivational, and physiological mechanism, which lead to self-learning and ultimately lead to self-efficacy and progress
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Teachers' Self Efficacy in Relation to Pupils' Academic Performance

Teachers' Self Efficacy in Relation to Pupils' Academic Performance

High efficacious teachers affect their pupils' performance in the class. This study determined the significant relationship between teachers' self-efficacy and their pupils' academic performance of the selected districts in the Division of Misamis Occidental during the school year 2017-2018. Seventy-five (75) teachers and 225 pupils responded to the study. The researcher used the Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale to measure teacher efficacy and the first and second grading ratings of the pupils through documentary analysis to determine the pupils' academic performance. Data were analyzed and interpreted using mean, standard deviation, and the Pearson Product Moment Correlation Coefficient. Findings revealed that the level of teachers' self-efficacy was high, and the pupils' academic performance was satisfactory. The teachers' self- efficacy in instructional strategies and student engagement was related to the pupils' performance. Teachers have to conduct an assessment inventory that assesses the pupils' learning styles and intelligence. This may serve as basis in planning instructional strategies for diverse pupils.
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The contribution of a social enterprise to the building of social capital in a disadvantaged urban area of London

The contribution of a social enterprise to the building of social capital in a disadvantaged urban area of London

There was a huge building, it was huge. They had youth groups on there every day. The space was much larger than it is now, maybe three times bigger. People aren’t happy with this building. They lost it all. When the plan first came out for this building, they put all the plans for us to look at. The plan was a lot bigger than this [actual size of the building]. And they kept saying, we have run out of money, we have run out of money. It is at least two thirds smaller than it should have been. And it has been taken away from us. This is now owned and run by Surestart. But what is Surestart? Ah just another government quango (member of the local resident association) The above viewpoint was not shared by the SureStart official who was interviewed. This interviewee reported that the old community centre was inefficient and old, and the youth club was almost entirely white
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The academic, physical and social self perceptions of pupils with Down syndrome

The academic, physical and social self perceptions of pupils with Down syndrome

First, as mentioned above, one aim of stage 2 of the research was to show that individual lives exist behind the label of Down Syndrom e. A s Goodley (1996) advocates, research should move away from generalised and pathological models of learning difficulties and on to personalised accounts which recognise the importance of individual differences. Similarly, Tro yn a (1994) cautions against the reductionist logic in research which binds participants together on the basis of a totalising category (e g., Down Syndrom e), and which leads to all other identities (e.g., age, gender, socio­ economic status) being subordinated or ignored. Tro yna (1994) argued that research is disempowering if it reproduces the social stereotypes which in the past played a role In disallowing participants access to power. Therefore, by adopting an individualistic approach, study 2 w as more likely to provide the information necessary to challenge society's tendency to assume pupils with Down Syndrom e are homogeneous. Using qualitative case studies to focus on individual life stories should highlight the heterogeneity of, for example, individual experiences, histories, perceptions, personal strengths and weaknesses. Quantitative approaches are not suited to this aim because such approaches focus on general findings and consistencies across large samples.
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Down and Out in Paris and London By George Orwell (1933)

Down and Out in Paris and London By George Orwell (1933)

cloths. Some of them are diseased; some of them are fifty years old. For miles on end they trot in the sun or rain, head down, dragging at the shafts, with the sweat dripping from their grey moustaches. When they go too slowly the pas- senger calls them BAHINCHUT. They earn thirty or forty rupees a month, and cough their lungs out after a few years. The gharry ponies are gaunt, vicious things that have been sold cheap as having a few years’ work left in them. Their master looks on the whip as a substitute for food. Their work expresses itself in a sort of equation—whip plus food equals energy; generally it is about sixty per cent whip and forty per cent food. Sometimes their necks are encircled by one vast sore, so that they drag all day on raw flesh. It is still possible to make them work, however; it is just a question of thrashing them so hard that the pain behind outweighs the pain in front. After a few years even the whip loses its vir- tue, and the pony goes to the knacker. These are instances of unnecessary work, for there is no real need for gharries and rickshaws; they only exist because Orientals consider it vulgar to walk. They are luxuries, and, as anyone who has ridden in them knows, very poor luxuries. They afford a small amount of convenience, which cannot possibly bal- ance the suffering of the men and animals.
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Measuring disadvantaged pupils’ attainment gaps over time (updated 29th January 2015)

Measuring disadvantaged pupils’ attainment gaps over time (updated 29th January 2015)

A larger gap is observed at key stage 4 even if progress scores (not shown) are substituted for attainment scores, indicating that the gap does indeed widen during secondary school, although not by as much as a raw comparison of key stage 2 and key stage 4 Index values in the latest year would suggest. Much of the difference between key stages comes from the time lag / cohort effect. There has been a decreasing trend in the gap over time, as shown by the longer time series of measures for pupils eligible for free school meals. Pupils sitting GCSEs in 2013 will usually have completed key stage 2 in 2008 and the decreasing trend suggests that there was already a larger difference in outcomes for current GCSE pupils at age 11 than for the most recent key stage 2 cohorts. Prior attainment has a very strong influence on achievement at GCSE so we would expect to see a lag in the reduction of the gap at key stage 4.
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Relationship Assessment between Absenteeism and their Academic Performance:  The Case of Selected Pupils in Laguindingan Central School

Relationship Assessment between Absenteeism and their Academic Performance: The Case of Selected Pupils in Laguindingan Central School

Financial constraints can also be considered as determining factor on the increasing absenteeism cases and its negative impact on academic performance. Kunje (2009) investigated in his findings that families in Malawi that are socially categorized as wealthy registered a good indication on the good performance of the students than those that are considered poor families as they can provide more on the needs of their students. Consequently, poor families have experienced malnutrition, absenteeism, hunger and ill health hinders the growth and achievement of students in school (Muola, 2010). Moreover, Onsomu (2006) also found out that families with good quality homes, adequate food and have acquired more possessions, can provide the materials and equipment needed for their children with highly educated parents perform better in schools.
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Student Performance and Academic Pattern Analysis

Student Performance and Academic Pattern Analysis

Education being the most important factor influencing the society, it has to be carried out in an organised and effective way. The students who are part of any educational institution should be analysed and treated in the ways that best suits them rather than treating all of them with a single ideology. Data Analytics being the field of science, of analysing the present data trends to come to a conclusion which can be used for future improvements, can be used in this scenario to understand the student’s ideology and respond accordingly. By analysis the student’s academic performance data we can draw patterns of their behaviour and can then draw conclusive changes that may help lead them to a better performance scope. Traditional academic approaches rarely analyse the student’s performance data and look upon them for any conclusive changes to be implemented for the enhanced academic results. This leads to treating all the students with a single ideology without any involvement of improvement and without looking into the sectors which needs to be improved. This type of approach are very ineffective when compared to an analysed approach. In this fast pace world of analysis, we can apply data analysis to elucidate this gap by analysis the student’s performance data and then draw effective conclusions and prediction from them By applying data analysis over the student performance data we can get a clear picture of student’s participation/involvement in the programs conducted by the institute. We will also get a clear idea of the performance curve of the students and their behavioural patterns. At last we can use these results to take the best move accordingly which helps them to improve their performance and lead them to an effective academic approach.
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The Latinas' internet: meanings and practices in the everyday lives of disadvantaged migrant women in London

The Latinas' internet: meanings and practices in the everyday lives of disadvantaged migrant women in London

These are relevant questions for domestication amid the worldwide spread of migration flows and interconnected people. With this research I have found that the challenge is to address these differences without erasing the beginning of the process and the meanings already given. From my experience with Latinas in London this can be theoretically and empirically tackled by revisiting and further developing the concept of redomestication. This is rooted in the core of domestication as it recognises that meanings and practices are constantly changing, and when first mentioned as a concept, by its own merits acknowledged different needs, routines and/or persons involved (Lie and Sorensen, 1996). This is a reminder of the dynamic nature of domestication, a never-ending process where changes in the environment leave a mark on how devices are appropriated. This is the reason why scholars have looked at the role of phones and computers in new contexts (Haddon, 2004). However, this has not yet been done with the internet, nor in cases such as migration when there are several changes at once, touching simultaneously on social, cultural and economic aspects of individuals’ lives, as I encountered during this project. Therefore one of my contributions to the concept is to go one step further to operationalise it, which will enable future research on the matter to address technologies’ role under new – and sometimes more challenging – circumstances. In order to do this it is important to recognise and highlight the complexity as well as the particularities of each case. For example, some of the women I encountered during fieldwork had already made sense of the internet, and this meaning did not disappear completely but ‘travelled’ with them as they changed countries. Participants looked to the internet for a continuity of practices that provided them
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