Top PDF Access and waiting times in children and young people’s mental health services

Access and waiting times in children and young people’s mental health services

Access and waiting times in children and young people’s mental health services

when problems can be explained as a normal reaction to a life event; where problem is entirely school-related; service request passed back to referrer. Where information about individual providers’ thresholds for accepting referrals or waiting times are included in this report, it is important to highlight that a straightforward comparison between different providers is difficult. There are no standardised eligibility criteria across CAMHS and each provider collects data about access and waiting times in a different way. Providers with the highest percentage of children who are not accepted may not be the worst performers, as other providers may be measuring this in a different way. Similarly, it is difficult to compare performance across providers on maximum waiting times because of the risk that these are outliers. We have included the average of these maximum waiting times to demonstrate that there are many young people waiting a lot longer than the median waiting times demonstrate. A similar methodology has been employed by NHS Benchmarking. 5 The wide variation between providers indicates that much more could be done to share best practice in increasing access across local areas.
Show more

16 Read more

Access to children and young people’s mental health services: 2018

Access to children and young people’s mental health services: 2018

Our data shows that between one fifth and one quarter of children referred to specialist services are deemed inappropriate for specialist treatment. The proportion of rejected referrals was rising until 2015, and due to low response rates in areas with previously high rates of rejection we cannot be sure that there has been any real improvement in 2018. A conservative estimate of the number of rejected referrals in the latest year is 55,800, but the true number will be higher than this due to providers that did not respond. There is also wide variation between providers, with some rejecting approximately half of all referrals and some reporting that they rejected fewer than one per cent of young people referred this year. There is no consistent measure of how many young people are not accepted into treatment making it difficult to compare across providers. Some may only offer certain tiers of services, include a wider category of young people in their response or filter referrals to other services in ways that result in them not being recorded as ‘rejected.’
Show more

33 Read more

Transformation of mental health services for children and young people in England

Transformation of mental health services for children and young people in England

The CYP IAPT program was designed to transform the existing CAMHS. The rationale behind the transformation was that CAMHS is primarily a psychologically based service, with existing services facing the major challenge of working with limited resources to meet the needs of an increasing number of children and young people with mental health problems. Many services had a reputation for being difficult to access by patients and the general practitioners referring to them, long waiting times, and a high frequency of missed appointments. A review indicated that such services were often not able to provide evidence- based treatments because of clinician skills shortages, and were not routinely collecting outcomes data, which made it difficult to evaluate their clinical or cost effectiveness
Show more

41 Read more

Improving children and young people’s mental health services

Improving children and young people’s mental health services

and accountability for spending and outcomes. Key findings Planning for transformation 5 The government faces significant challenges in transforming children and young people’s mental health services, as part of its commitment to parity of esteem between physical and mental health services. The government acknowledges that historically mental health services have been seen as of secondary importance to physical health services. Its periodic survey of the prevalence of mental health conditions among young people allows it to estimate overall need, but historically it has treated far fewer young people than this. In 2015, the most up-to-date estimate indicated that only around one-quarter of children and young people who needed support from mental health services could access those services. The government has endorsed a vision for improving support for children and young people’s mental health, set out in Future in Mind. Delivering this vision will require coordinated action across different parts of government – for example, health, education, local government and justice – and between national and local bodies. Each of these has its own priorities, funding challenges and accountability arrangements. Experience in other sectors also suggests that raising the profile of mental health support and services and reducing the stigma of mental illness may uncover previously unidentified further demand (paragraphs 1.3, 1.7, 1.10 to 1.12, 2.28, 3.18, 3.22 to 3.24 and Figures 4 and 18).
Show more

64 Read more

Services for Children and Young People with Mental Health Needs. Lancashire s Local Offer. Lancashire s Health Services

Services for Children and Young People with Mental Health Needs. Lancashire s Local Offer. Lancashire s Health Services

1. Name of the service and what the service provides Lancashire Care NHS Foundation Trust - Child & Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) – Community Services Lancashire Care Foundation Trust Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) Tier 3 provide a service for children and young people aged 5-16 who have a range of emotional and behavioural difficulties. The service supports and promotes emotional health and wellbeing.

5 Read more

Children and Young People s Mental Health Services Workforce Report for Local Authorities

Children and Young People s Mental Health Services Workforce Report for Local Authorities

Background • This bespoke report for Local Authorities outlines details of the second comprehensive national stocktake of the CYP MH workforce, which builds on a previous data collection performed by the NHS Benchmarking Network in 2016. Children and Young People’s mental health services are a high profile service area that has been identified for investment and development in a number of recent national strategies including the NHS Five Year Forward View (2014) and NHS Long Term Plan (2019). CYP MH was also discussed in a recent Government green paper “Transforming Children and Young People’s Mental Health” (2017) which outlined aspirations for an inclusive multi-agency portfolio of CYP MH services that would form the backbone of an expanded delivery model in future years. Much of this vision is articulated in the NHS Long Term Plan with workforce growth central to plans to expand CYP MH services in future.
Show more

37 Read more

The effectiveness of interventions aimed at improving access to health and mental health services for looked after children and young people: a systematic review

The effectiveness of interventions aimed at improving access to health and mental health services for looked after children and young people: a systematic review

the child or young person being moved from one local authority to another (Callaghan 2003; McAuley & Young 2006; Richardson 2002; Street & Davies 2002). The emotional and mental health of children and young people who may have already experienced trauma, loss and separation prior to entry into care together with insufficient support or training for professional carers may contribute to a placement breakdown and requests for the child to be moved (Oosterman 2007; Sallnas, Vinnerljung & Westermark 2004). It is acknowledged that lack of timely and appropriate interventions from specialist mental health services can compound or create a circle of LACYP with emotional and behavioural problems unable to receive appropriate treatment or help from services due to placement instability but continuing to experience placement disruption because of their unresolved or untreated emotional distress and behavioural difficulties. The current review identified one study examining placement stability, which found a positive impact of placing mental health clinicians onsite at foster care agencies on placement stability, although further robust research with baseline data and a control sample is warranted to corroborate this finding and inform commissioning and provision of services.
Show more

19 Read more

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

The 2017 interviews and analyses are based on participants’ age at 31 August 2017, with participants grouped with their peers in terms of school year. Confidence intervals Information about confidence intervals are presented in the text and described as the range for which a value is likely to fall within had the whole population participated in this survey rather than a sample. This range was calculated based on 95% confidence interval and indicates the range we would expect estimates to fall within nineteen times in twenty, if the study was repeated with new samples.
Show more

45 Read more

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Differences in data collection and analysis should be considered when comparing results between age groups, as these may affect comparability. Confidence intervals Information about confidence intervals are presented in the text and described as the range for which a value is likely to fall within had the whole population participated in this survey rather than a sample. This range was calculated based on 95% confidence interval and indicates the range we would expect estimates to fall within nineteen times in twenty, if the study was repeated with new samples.
Show more

29 Read more

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

More recent follow-up studies of children with ADHD attending child mental health services found higher persistence rates into adulthood (van Lieshout et al., 2016). This topic report splits hyperactivity disorders into two categories: • Hyperkinetic disorder - Symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity are present and lead to impairment in several settings such as school or work, home life and leisure activities. Symptoms are evident by seven years old, and can be identified retrospectively

27 Read more

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Discussion Most surveys measuring less common mental and neurodevelopmental conditions use short screening questionnaires to identify potential cases, these tend to overestimate prevalence. Other studies sift routine health and education data to identify recognised cases, but miss those children who were not recognised by services (Brugha et al., 2018). The last survey to have assessed the disorders covered in this report in a general population sample of children in England was the previous survey in this series, conducted in 2004. Change in rate since 2004 can be estimated because methods in those years were comparable, and our approach is less affected by changes in diagnostic criteria and clinical practice.
Show more

37 Read more

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Measuring recognition of difficulties with emotions, concentration, behaviour or getting along with people The perception of a problem is one of the key requirements to accessing support, so the extent to which poor mental health is recognised as such is an important factor to consider when thinking about access to services (Wolpert and Ford, 2015). Children, particularly those of primary school age, rarely access services on their own behalf, which means the perception of important adults is crucial to their access to services in relation to their mental health. The extent to which parents or young people recognise mental health difficulties can be inferred from response to the first question on the impact supplement of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. This asks the parent or young person whether they consider that the child or they have a problem with emotions, concentration, behaviour or getting along with people. A report of definite or severe difficulties was considered to indicate the recognition of poor mental health and a report of no or minor problems to suggest that the parent or young
Show more

33 Read more

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

After interviews were complete, a team of eleven trained clinical raters reviewed the data to reach disorder ratings for each participant. Raters applied the diagnostic criteria for specific disorders set out in the tenth International Classification of Disease (ICD-10) (WHO, 1992) and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM–5) (APA, 2013). Diagnostic classification systems were not used to diagnose the feeding, sleeping and elimination disorders as this was experimental work to see what proportion of families have problems in these domains that sound as if they would plausibly justify referral to specialist services.
Show more

34 Read more

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

2. Hard to persuade GP, teacher or other professional to refer me 3. Was referred but specialist services were reluctant to see us 4. Didn't like what the specialist services offered us 5. Didn't think that specialists would be able to help 6. Worried about what other people may think of us 7. Worried that my child might be taken away from me 8. Had a bad experience with specialist services in the past 9. Difficult to arrange appointments for times we could manage 10. The specialist was too far away or too hard to get to

154 Read more

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

inappropriate treatment. This information would not be available if other methods of collection were used, such as sampling from lists of patients in contact with mental health services, or patients registered with a general practitioner. This approach has quality implications for other survey aims. For example, a survey of the resident population excludes those who were living in a care home (for example mental health units and young offender institutions). As discussed in this publication, people living in such settings are likely to have worse mental health than those living in private households, which may have an effect on the quality of the prevalence estimates produced by this survey. However, the proportion of the overall population not living in private households is so small that this would have little (or no significant) impact on the prevalence estimates for the disorders examined, as such the decision was made that the improvement in the survey’s ability to provide an estimate of the treatment gap justified this trade-off between these two survey outcomes. Details of the strengths and limitations of the results of this survey are detailed in full in the Survey Design and Methods Report.
Show more

12 Read more

Schools Mental Health Services and Young Children s Emotions, Behavior, and Learning

Schools Mental Health Services and Young Children s Emotions, Behavior, and Learning

available as needed by staff." The SASS asked teachers this question in each sample wave, except for 1999-2000. Table 7 displays estimation results similar to Table 6 but using dichotomous measures of how strongly teachers agreed or disagreed with this statement concerning materials. The estimates in Table 7 do not suggest a coincidental reallocation or enhancement of other resources. In states adopting programs, elementary teachers are slightly more likely to "strongly disagree" that they have access to materials and this association is very slightly greater for elementary-level teachers than for high school teachers. None of these falsification estimates are statistically significant; they are all either trivial in size or inconsistent with an upward bias in the estimates displayed in Table 6.
Show more

45 Read more

Schools Mental Health Services and Young Children s Emotions, Behavior, and Learning

Schools Mental Health Services and Young Children s Emotions, Behavior, and Learning

RANDALL REBACK is an Assistant Professor of Economics and Urban Studies at Barnard College, Columbia University. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This research was supported by a grant from the American Educational Research Association, which receives funds for its AERA Grants Programs from the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics of the Institute of Education Sciences and the National Science Foundation under NSF Grant #RED-0310268. Opinions reflect those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of the granting agencies. I am grateful for this funding and for research assistance from Angelica Ortega, Alex Perl, Daisy Chu, Angel Lam, Amy Corrigan, and Diana Stastny. I thank Julie Cullen, Janet Currie, Steve Ross, Jane Waldfogel, participants at the American Education Finance Association conference and the Mental Health Services Research conference, and the editor and three anonymous referees for their helpful suggestions. I also thank the National Center for Education Statistics for pro- viding access to the restricted-use versions of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Survey–Kindergarten Cohort data and the Schools and Staffing Survey data. Any errors are my own.
Show more

30 Read more

Mental health of children and young people in Great Britain, 2004

Mental health of children and young people in Great Britain, 2004

He is all over the place – always on the move. He won’t sit still at the table while we are eating – it’s fidgeting the whole time, getting up between courses. He’d get up between mouthfuls if I let him. If there’s a task that needs doing, whether it’s homework or tidying his room, he’ll start willingly but within a few minutes he’s been distracted and begun doing something else instead. Sometimes, it is just an excuse and he never really wanted to do it anyway, but there are many times when I’m sure he couldn’t help it. The teachers complain too, but I think they agree that it’s the way he is made. Outside the family he is quite shy, and this keeps him a bit under control. But within the family,
Show more

36 Read more

Mental health of children and young people in Great Britain, 2004

Mental health of children and young people in Great Britain, 2004

and non-professional services because they were worried about their child’s emotions, behaviour or concentration. Over three-quarters (81 per cent) of parents of children with a conduct disorder had sought some form of advice or help in the previous 12 months because of concerns about their child’s mental health or behaviour. The majority of these (76 per cent overall) had approached a professional source, most commonly a teacher (60 per cent). Substantial minorities had contacted, or been referred to, a specialist, 28 per cent had contacted a mental health specialist and 24 per cent a special educational service such as an educational psychologist. A third (32 per cent) had approached their GP or a practice nurse and a similar proportion (34 per cent) had talked to family members or friends. Children with unsocialised or socialised conduct disorders were more likely than those with oppositional defiant disorder to have sought help with their child’s health or behavioural problems, 90 per cent and 87 per cent compared with 74 per cent. This difference was evident for both professional and informal sources. It may reflect the younger age profile of children with oppositional defiant disorder but further analysis showed that the variation was present for both children aged 5–10 and these aged 11–16. (Table 6.11). Parents who had mentioned a problem with their child’s emotions, attention or behaviour during the course of the interview and who had not seen a specialist were asked whether there was anything that had stopped them seeking such help. Fewer than a half (45 per cent) of the parents of children with conduct disorders mentioned any of the barriers prompted by the interviewer. The most common obstacles mentioned were lack of awareness of the service available (14 per cent), difficulty in getting a referral (14 per cent) and a belief that a specialist would be of no help (10 per cent). Similar barriers were mentioned by parents of children with emotional disorders although, again, the numbers with problems were quite small. (Table not shown)
Show more

416 Read more

Surrey Emotional Wellbeing and Mental Health Services for Children and Young People Needs Assessment Refresh

Surrey Emotional Wellbeing and Mental Health Services for Children and Young People Needs Assessment Refresh

Other women may have an existing mental illness which may persist, deteriorate or recur during this period of their lives when they can experience intense social, psychological and physical changes that may be part of the pregnancy and/or childbirth itself or as a result of a change in medication. Mental health problems experienced during this period include anxiety disorders, depression and postnatal psychotic disorders. Whilst the level of risk for many mental health problems is the same for women in the peri-natal period as it is for other adults, the risk for certain mental illnesses is increased: increased risk of developing the illness; increased risk in the illness being more severe; and increased risk of experiencing a recurrence. Depression is the most common mental health problem during the peri-natal period experienced by 10 – 14% of all mothers nationally 20 . Fathers also suffer depression during the first year of a child’s life; one study suggested 4% of fathers suffered from depression during this period and 20-50% of new fathers with a depressed partner experienced depression 21 . There is no recent data available at a county level however figures for prevalence in Surrey of peri-natal mental health illnesses were previously calculated using the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) benchmarking tool 22 .
Show more

82 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...