Top PDF Addressing school violence and bullying : evidence review

Addressing school violence and bullying : evidence review

Addressing school violence and bullying : evidence review

In 2014–15, the programme was evaluated by asking children and young people to complete a questionnaire about attitudes to sex and relationships as well as an analysis of session feedback forms and qualitative interviews. The questionnaire was filled in before the participants attended any workshop, and again after they had taken part in any three workshops. After attending three sessions, children and young people reported having more knowledge of the relevant law and of sources of support for those affected. In general, the attitudes expressed were less supportive of sexual violence. It is not known if a particular session or combination of sessions were more or less likely to encourage a change in attitudes and whether any changes were retained in the longer term. Qualitative feedback from the feedback forms and interviews suggested that the sessions had been well received by the children and young people who took part. 87
Show more

51 Read more

What works in tackling homophobic, biphobic and transphobic (HBT) bullying among school-age children and young people?
Evidence review and typology of initiatives

What works in tackling homophobic, biphobic and transphobic (HBT) bullying among school-age children and young people? Evidence review and typology of initiatives

Firstly, the literature reviewed in several articles and some primary research suggested that it was important that teachers felt comfortable talking about sexual orientation and gender identity. This was because discomfort could convey that there was something wrong about doing so. For example, from their evidence review and primary research with teachers and pupils O’Higgins et al. (2010) suggest that teachers with backgrounds in social subjects may be best placed to deliver such teaching. Paul et al. (2010) found in their evaluation of Quality Circle Time that it was important for teachers to have a high commitment to tackling homophobic bullying to create the right inclusive environment. Using teachers or external providers with whom pupils didn’t interact every day could also help facilitate a more open discussion for pupils because it was easier to talk to someone with whom they were less involved (see below).
Show more

29 Read more

Addressing school violence and bullying : evidence briefing

Addressing school violence and bullying : evidence briefing

NHS Health Scotland was asked by the Scottish Government’s Learning Directorate Health and Wellbeing Unit to review what works to prevent and reduce school violence and bullying. This paper brings together international review-level evidence and published outcome evaluations of programmes implemented in schools in the UK and Ireland. The purpose of this report is to inform the development of policy, guidance and support on bullying and violence in schools. Ultimately, this will contribute to the following national outcomes:

20 Read more

A review of evidence for bystander intervention to prevent sexual and domestic violence in universities

A review of evidence for bystander intervention to prevent sexual and domestic violence in universities

movement and association, or by counselling that women should unilaterally change their social habits, or by conveying unilateral expectations upon women to identify risky situations. Such strategies can also only be ‘sticking-plaster’ solutions to the problem of male violence against women, as they do not address the issue at its root by reducing the number of actual or potential perpetrators in the population at large (DeGue, Simon et al, 2012; DeGue et al, 2014; Lonsway, 1996; Schewe and O’Donohue, 1993; Schwartz et al, 2001). Further, and crucially, such strategies reflect and reinforce those very social norms – including the idea that male violence is normative - that may contribute to the motivation of offenders and to the lack of capable guardianship of victim/survivors. In other words, attempts to reduce incidence by addressing the presence of victims may have the effect of increasing incidence by promoting motivated offending and reducing capable guardianship. Thus, efforts to prevent violence at primary, secondary and tertiary levels may be ultimately be compromised by non-ecological approaches to addressing victim vulnerability. As Schwartz et al have noted: “A lack of capable guardianship can be presumed in a society that trains women to blame themselves for being forcible rape victims” (2001, p630). An advantage of bystander programmes is that they can provide a positive, inclusive and empowering framework for prevention that acknowledges and educates participants about warning signs and situations of heightened risk for violence without making women-as-victims the gatekeepers who by extension may be perceived to hold some responsibility for that violence.
Show more

69 Read more

Bullying and Victimization Experienced By School Children: A Review

Bullying and Victimization Experienced By School Children: A Review

Bullying is an everlasting problem in the lives of school children.Bullying represents an unwanted aggressive behavior of someone towards the other person. Bullying behavior involves the perceived power imbalance that has been found harmful on the targeted person and this is frequent aggressive behavior that is less favorable for the victims. 1 Bullying assumes various forms at different ages, growing in complexity and sensitivity as children develops. Bullying and victimization occurs to children both in-person and indirectly, through threats and rumors. Physical violence remains the prevalent form of bullying among children. This abuse typically evolves into verbal or social bullying as students mature, often with one or more bullies excluding or manipulating their victim through several mediums. Bullying equally occurs through technology or cyber space, when an individual or group uses an electronic medium to engage in deliberate, repeated and hostile communication exchanges with the intent to harm others. The popularity of social media has generated this form of bullying more prevalent, as technology-based platforms allow perpetrators to share unkind words and images anonymously.Bullying has acknowledged an inordinate deal of responsiveness that highlights the consequences of bullying behavior on academic, social and emotional outcomes. 2, 3 The effect of predisposition-related bullying should not be underestimated. Bullying must be recognized, understood and taken seriously.
Show more

8 Read more

SCHOOL CLIMATE AND BULLYING PREVENTION

SCHOOL CLIMATE AND BULLYING PREVENTION

School  climate  reform,  an  evidence-­‐based  strategy,  supports  K-­‐12   students,  school  personnel,  parents/guardians  and  community   members  learning  and  working  together  to  promote  pro-­‐social   education.    Done  well,  these  efforts  will  result  in  even  safer,  more   supportive,  engaging,  helpfully  challenging  and  harmonious   schools.  The  U.S.  Department  of  Education,  the  Center  for  Disease   Control  and  Prevention,  the  Institute  for  Educational  Sciences,   President  Obama’s  Bully  Prevention  Partnership,  the  US   Departments  of  Justice  and  Education’s  School  Discipline   Consensus  project,  a  growing  number  of  State  Departments  of   Education  and  foreign  educational  ministries  support  and/or   endorse  school  climate  renewal  as  a  strategy  to  increase  student   learning  and  achievement,  enhance  school  connectedness,   reduce  high  school  dropout  rates,  prevent  bullying  and  other   forms  of  violence,  and  enhance  teacher  retention  rates.    
Show more

5 Read more

Violence and Bullying Incidents Reported by School Counselors: The Efficacy of Counselors and Preventive and Interventional Approaches

Violence and Bullying Incidents Reported by School Counselors: The Efficacy of Counselors and Preventive and Interventional Approaches

school violence and bullying issues. Even two years after the announcement of a national action plan, preventive and interventional efforts organized by school counselors are very limited. Some school counselors reported that they did not promote any activities for school violence or bullying, although this result might be associated with counselors who were not aware of any preventive or interventional activities. Furthermore, this report might be an indication that personnel are uninformed regarding a very serious problem despite the presence of a national announcement. Similarly, none of the counselors reported that they used any familiar or packaged anti-bullying programs, despite the fact that a wide range of such programs is listed in the bullying literature (Lund et al., 2012; Garrett, 2003). Additionally, results showed that school counselors are more likely to focus on students by providing seminars and informing them via class-based guidance activities as a prevention method. Interviewing students and their families was another applied intervention used by school counselors, which is also listed as a commonly applied intervention in bullying literature (Lund et al., 2012). However, activities/approaches towards teachers and families and addressing the whole-school context were very limited. In contrast, the literature emphasises that school-wide and community-oriented approaches are more effective (Garrett, 2003) and that many schools and states have continued to improve such models following the launch of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program in the 1970s. However, such efforts are still limited and mostly student-oriented in Turkey. No evidence-based or culturally adopted anti-bullying programs have been examined by scholars due to a lack of these adapted programs in Turkey. Only a few descriptive study results reported the prevalence and seriousness of these school problems.
Show more

19 Read more

Bullying and Victimization Experienced By School 				Children: A Review

Bullying and Victimization Experienced By School Children: A Review

Bullying is an everlasting problem in the lives of school children.Bullying represents an unwanted aggressive behavior of someone towards the other person. Bullying behavior involves the perceived power imbalance that has been found harmful on the targeted person and this is frequent aggressive behavior that is less favorable for the victims. 1 Bullying assumes various forms at different ages, growing in complexity and sensitivity as children develops. Bullying and victimization occurs to children both in-person and indirectly, through threats and rumors. Physical violence remains the prevalent form of bullying among children. This abuse typically evolves into verbal or social bullying as students mature, often with one or more bullies excluding or manipulating their victim through several mediums. Bullying equally occurs through technology or cyber space, when an individual or group uses an electronic medium to engage in deliberate, repeated and hostile communication exchanges with the intent to harm others. The popularity of social media has generated this form of bullying more prevalent, as technology-based platforms allow perpetrators to share unkind words and images anonymously.Bullying has acknowledged an inordinate deal of responsiveness that highlights the consequences of bullying behavior on academic, social and emotional outcomes. 2, 3 The effect of predisposition-related bullying should not be underestimated. Bullying must be recognized, understood and taken seriously.
Show more

8 Read more

Addressing Violence against Women within the Education Sector

Addressing Violence against Women within the Education Sector

Educational reforms can play an important role in preventing violence against women by increasing school safety, by empowering women through education, and by promoting better attitudes and practices among students with regard to women’s human rights. International studies have reliably shown that women with higher levels of education have a lower risk of being physically or sexually abused, though the link between education and violence is not necessarily linear (Jewkes et. al., 2002). Unfortunately, a growing body of evidence suggests that sexual harassment is widespread in educational settings in many parts of the world (see Box 1). In South Africa and Zambia, researchers documented a pattern in which schools dismissed girls’ reports of sexual violence and harassment and failed to respond with any seriousness. Similar reports have emerged from other continents.
Show more

6 Read more

Examining Bullying, Harassment, and Horizontal Violence (BHHV) in Student Nurses

Examining Bullying, Harassment, and Horizontal Violence (BHHV) in Student Nurses

Purpose: This field test measured bullying, harassment, and horizontal violence (BHHV) using the BEHAVE Survey in a sample of student nurses in New York. Aims: To examine the proportion of (BHHV) during the clinical portion of their nursing education and the rates of prior experience with BHHV; perceptions of the frequency, seriousness, source(s), and locations; and the reporting behaviors of student nurses while engaging in clinical education. Method: This descriptive, quantitative survey of baccalaureate nursing students at a university- based school of nursing was conducted to field test the BEHAVE Survey. Results: A total of 32 participants (96.7% participation rate) completed this survey, with 71.9% reporting current experienced or observed BHHV and 46.8% (36/77) of incidents originated from a nurse. Discussion: These results of the BEHAVE Survey confirmed the high prevalence of BHHV experienced in the student clinical learning environment and is consistent with prior studies in both American and international studies. Conclusions: Further research is warranted to continue the development and testing of the BEHAVE Survey and its application to a larger sample of students to inform policy and education on ways to include student nurses in programs addressing and preventing BHHV.
Show more

145 Read more

The Future of Evidence-based Bullying and Violence Prevention in Childhood and Adolescence

The Future of Evidence-based Bullying and Violence Prevention in Childhood and Adolescence

young people is a widespread problem in Europe. According to the 2005/6 Health Behaviour of School-Aged Children survey, which covers almost all countries in Europe, an average of 42% of eleven- year-olds and 35% of fifteen-year-olds reported having been involved in a physical fight at least once during the previous twelve months (Currie et al. 2008). Aggressive behaviour can have serious and long-term negative effects on young people’s health and emotional well-being. For example, children and adolescents actively involved in bul- lying and violence are at a significantly greater risk of later problem behaviours such as substance abuse, academic failure, unemployment and crimi- nal convictions (Fergusson, Horwood and Ridder 2005; Loeber and Hay 1997). Data from the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study (ISRD-2) indicate large variations in self-reported total delinquency across European countries, rang- ing from 40.1% at the highest end (Ireland), to low prevalence rates in Mediterranean countries (18.7%) (Enzmann et al. 2010).
Show more

28 Read more

Interventions addressing student bullying in the clinical workplace: a narrative review

Interventions addressing student bullying in the clinical workplace: a narrative review

Under this theme we report further specific evidence to suggest that staff might suffer negative consequences of a bullying intervention. These findings add to the work of McGregor [34] about deleterious effects of policy, re- ported above. Studies explain how an intervention tar- geting a single professional group (e.g. ‘the nurses’) can hurt that group, by making the group feel ‘picked on’ and at fault [34]. Similarly, interventions specifically tar- geting the ‘bully, ’ e.g. where mentioned in an interven- tion description (‘Let’s stop the bullies!’) also marginalise and infer guilt, even in the innocent. Such inferences have also been shown to result in a staff member’s fail- ure to engage because they might respond with a self-protective ‘counter challenge.’ Some authors warn such responses to targeting can also lead to continued or renewed bullying behaviour [9, 34, 71, 73]. Such ap- proaches underpin the incorrect assumptions that bully- ing lies within individuals unrelated to context and that punitive measures are better than supportive ones.
Show more

13 Read more

Mapping of education and training addressing violence against women

Mapping of education and training addressing violence against women

Raise awareness about the significance, for each sector, of violence against women. This will involve understanding what each sector would regard as relevant, for example, research evidence, and information about likely benefits both to service users and public agencies. The aim would be to encourage professionals to fully meet their responsibilities. Each sector will also need to be convinced that introducing new course content will fit with existing curricular demands and enhance the training they provide, there will practically need to be teaching materials and teachers to deliver the course/module. Identifying a champion or champions within each sector will be essential.
Show more

6 Read more

Addressing Intimate Partner Violence in Healthy Relationship Programs

Addressing Intimate Partner Violence in Healthy Relationship Programs

IPV can be defined as physical, sexual, or psychological harm, or reproductive coercion by a spouse, partner, or former partner. 3 The term “teen dating violence (TDV)” refers to similar abuses when they occur in youth dating experiences, 4 typically among middle and high school aged youth. 5, 6 (A glossary of key terms used in this paper appears as Appendix A.) IPV is widespread in the U.S., and women are disproportionately impacted: Recent data show that 31.5% of U.S. women and 27.5% of U.S. men had experienced IPV within their lifetimes 7 and 42% of female and 14% of male IPV victims report physical injury. 8 TDV is also a pervasive issue: Two thirds of adolescents who have dated also report experiencing abuse from a dating
Show more

43 Read more

Toward a respectful workplace: A handbook on preventing and addressing workplace bullying and harassment

Toward a respectful workplace: A handbook on preventing and addressing workplace bullying and harassment

Three months earlier, the new district manager informed Sarah her performance and continued employment were under review because her store was not meeting its targets. Since then, the district manager has met with Sarah every two weeks to review her team’s sales, salary and overtime costs, absenteeism, and contribution to corporate profits. Sarah says the meetings are very tense and unfriendly, but there has been no yelling, swearing, or other intimidating or humiliating conduct. Sarah believes the district manager dislikes her and that, because she has been asked to have these meetings, she is being singled out.
Show more

60 Read more

Impact of a varied understanding of school bullying

Impact of a varied understanding of school bullying

Kaikkonen, 2001) therefore deny or avoid the threat of the concept, a potential reason for avoiding conversation of the topic. There are other potential explanations. Bullies may not be avoiding discussion at all, they may not be aware that their behaviour is ‘wrong’ they may believe that their behaviour is ‘acceptable’. Gordillo (2012) states that aggressors can have simplified thought patterns, an inability to break a concept into parts enables some aggressors to believe that their behaviour in ‘normal’ and can be acted out without repercussions. However, it is also possible that bullies are able to avoid detection using social and cognitive skills to manipulate the situation to their advantage (Sutton et al, 1999). Victims & Bystanders: victims and bystanders were confident in defining bullying. Research explains similar effects of bullying on bystanders and victims (Janson & Hazler, 2004). Both bystanders and victims defined bullying similarly. Defining bullying as a direct aggressive act carried out in repetition and over time. Victims and bystanders discussed experiencing inconsistent use of the term bullying which led to deterioration of friendship groups and impact on intervention as a consequence. Bully-victims: bully-victims were inconsistent in their definition of the term. Often bully-victims would provide a definition from the onset that would alter throughout the process. Even though bully- victims responses were inconsistent, one topic was constant. Bully-victims coded aggressive behaviour as bullying by the victims’ ability to cope. If a victim was unable to cope with the aggressive behaviour the act should be categorised as bullying, if an individual could “laugh it off” the act should not be categorised as bullying.
Show more

18 Read more

Protecting Children from Bullying at School

Protecting Children from Bullying at School

A child getting special education at a public or charter school has an Individualized Education Program (IEP). This IEP is written at least once a year and lists goals for the child in their areas of need. An IEP Progress Report, talking about the child’s progress on each goal, must be mailed to the child’s caregiver regularly. The child’s IEP will say how often the IEP Progress Reports must be mailed. Legal Aid recently filed a complaint against the Cleveland Metropolitan School District because caregivers of children with IEPs were not getting IEP Progress Reports as often as they should.
Show more

6 Read more

Race, social networks, and school bullying

Race, social networks, and school bullying

working I was told I had to go to school. One day, I was walking to my next class when a so- called friend came over a spat in my face and just walked off. That day I thought to myself that I had it and that I no longer wished to live, so I went home took a load of pills and tried to end thankful my mum came in and called 999. After that she try [sic] to talk, but I would just keep it all in and say a word. I went back to school and it was still going on. Day after day, I would try and cope try and not let them get to me, but it was to hard. I went home and slit my arm 5 stiches [sic] on each arm. That was just the first time. I have a big scar on my leg where I burned it with a piece of metal, I have scars all over me. I was taken out of school in year 10 and I have never gone back. I spent 6 month in my room not seeing anyone at all then my sister came and said that she was having a baby and that she wanted me to get better so that I can be there for the baby. So I did, I talked to people about what happened and I was put on tablets to help me get better. It has been two years since I last cut myself. I have a lovely niece and nephew. And yes i still think about cutting myself then I think if I did and I died, I would not be able to see them grown and be happy.
Show more

170 Read more

The complexity of children's involvement in school bullying

The complexity of children's involvement in school bullying

Maria said she felt ‘angry’ as a consequence, which may have contributed to her not wanting to affiliate with Emily ‘I don’t want to sit on the same table as her’. However, Maria did not reflect on how her avoidance of Emily may have caused her distress and how Tanya felt torn. Power is fluid and dynamic as pupils exclude and upset each other. Maria’s teacher considers the conflict as ‘arguing’ and expects the children to stop voluntarily. She does not investigate what underlying issues are contributing to the conflict or whether there is bullying. Maria feels it is impossible to resolve – ‘it’s never gonna be better’ – and is grappling with unhealthy relationships in which she feels entrapped. Maria presents an unusual finding about how nuanced bullying can be, which adds substance to the ‘grey’ areas (cf. Morita, 1996).
Show more

37 Read more

An Anti-Bullying Program in Review

An Anti-Bullying Program in Review

I hear the word ‘bully’ so much more than when I first started [OBPP]. Kids know what it is. I do see more of a comfort level with kids calling out others when they see bullying behavior. [The children] are more comfortable saying that conduct is ‘bully behavior’. Whereas before maybe they would say, “That’s not being very nice”. In addition, when the kids hear the word bully it stops them because nobody wants to be a bully. I have definitely seen them call each other out. I guess little things, in the hallway like kids being a little more respectful of their surroundings. [Is it] because I know society talks about bullying all the time so the word is out there more than it has been? Since we have started the program, we have upped supervision at recess and in the lunchroom; those simple things have made an impact because the playground is always the number one place where anything happens (Katie, personal communication, February 2012).
Show more

91 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...