Top PDF ISU ADVANCE Collaborative Transformation Project: Final Focal Department Synthesis Report

ISU ADVANCE Collaborative Transformation Project: Final Focal Department Synthesis Report

ISU ADVANCE Collaborative Transformation Project: Final Focal Department Synthesis Report

Faculty members who have on-going, grant-funded research projects (or who are consistently seeking funding and doing research) tend to view the boundaries between “work life” and “home life” as weak and more permeable. This is especially true in departments that embrace long and often irregular work hours as part of their culture. As long as these faculty members are not primarily responsible for the care of small children or have no aging or sick relatives for whom they must provide care, however, they are often quite satisfied with the work-life “balance” that they maintain—even if they are working long and irregular hours. If, however, faculty members who have on-going, grant- funded research and are a part of work culture that supports long hours also have small children or other relatives to care for, they are often dissatisfied with the “balance” between work and family life because they perceive one or the other of these aspects of life to be suffering. Furthermore, even in those departments having a work culture that supports the idea that work hours should not be so extensive that they interfere with faculty members‟ abilities to successfully fulfill family responsibilities, some faculty were more satisfied with the level of work-life balance in their lives than others. Faculty with small children and/or aging or sick relatives for whom they must provide care were less satisfied with the level of work-life balance in their lives than were other faculty. Faculty members‟ use of ISU‟s work-life/family friendly policies helped to moderate negative perceptions of work- life balance; but use of these policies does not appear to completely erase the concerns that some faculty members have about work-life balance.
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Executive Summary:  ISU ADVANCE Collaborative Transformation Project: First Round Focal Department Synthesis Report

Executive Summary: ISU ADVANCE Collaborative Transformation Project: First Round Focal Department Synthesis Report

The departmental work involved in the project was organized by ADVANCE Professors, Department Chairs and a departmental team or advisory group in each respective department. The methods for gathering the in-depth qualitative data were focus groups, individualized interviews with faculty and chairs, and existing documents (e.g., departmental governance documents) from each of the three STEM departments. The average participation rate among the faculty in the three departments was 71.5 percent. All interviews and focus groups were audio-recorded and then transcribed. Transcriptions yielded more than 1000 double-spaced pages of raw data in addition to the respective governance documents and notes from focal departmental web sites. The data were first analyzed separately for each department. Separate reports (executive summary, findings, strategies for addressing salient issues, summary of research methods) were then written for each department so that individual departments could begin the process of addressing issues particular to their own department.
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ISU ADVANCE Annual Report, Year 3: May 2008–March 2009

ISU ADVANCE Annual Report, Year 3: May 2008–March 2009

collaborative strategies for enhancing aspects of departmental climate that negatively impact faculty recruitment, retention and promotion. Collaborative transformation is a project that respects differences across departments in the kinds of work cultures departments embrace, routine departmental practices, and structures for organizing the faculty members’ work. Climate results, which are based on the analysis of focus group and interview data from each department, are “mirrored back” to faculty in each department. These results encompass both positive and negative aspects of workplace climate in each department and include findings related to departmental recruitment, retention and promotion practices (especially as these affect women and faculty of color). After each department receives the results of the climate study, they develop their own department-specific change strategies. ISU ADVANCE researchers work with the departments throughout this process. Results from the CT project are disseminated at ISU workshops, which are attended by faculty and administrators from across campus. Results are also disseminated outside the ISU campus at STEM and SBS professional association conferences (posters, paper presentations, etc.) and as articles published in academic journals.
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ISU ADVANCE Annual Report, Year 2: June 2008

ISU ADVANCE Annual Report, Year 2: June 2008

Our interactions with the above groups indicated several reasons for their enthusiasm. The collaborative transformation component is unique and has been very successful so far in meeting its goal of stimulating a sense of ownership at the department level. Reports indicate that faculty in the three focal departments so far have “bought into” the need for change, just as the NSF proposal had hoped they would. Department chairs were unanimously enthusiastic about their Collaborative Transformation reports, and we noted much anticipation on the part of the remaining six chairs about receiving theirs. Chairs felt that ADVANCE has made possible conversations about recruitment and retention, and they themselves seemed fluent in the vocabulary (e.g., “unconscious bias”) associated with unbiased recruitment strategies. The on- campus partners reiterated this theme of change in the campus-wide conversation. The Readers’ Theater was mentioned by many interviewees, so it seemed to have had a big impact. We were impressed with the Provost’s strong support, which is another positive element of the program, and which bodes well for the possibility of true and sustainable institutional transformation. The expertise and enthusiasm of the Advance Team was another strong positive element. We believe that progress is excellent for being only a year and a half into the grant.
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ISU ADVANCE Final Report August 2006-July 2012

ISU ADVANCE Final Report August 2006-July 2012

Over the past six years, the ISU ADVANCE Program has become Iowa State’s most prominent vehicle to recruit, retain, and advance women and women of color in STEM faculty positions. We are known for a well- managed network, innovative research, and an integrated approach to change. We have worked within departments using a Collaborative Transformation approach to improve the work environment for all faculty members. Our program has identified cultures, practices, and structures that enhance or hinder the careers of ISU faculty, and we have worked with faculty and administrators to transform university policies, practices, and academic culture in pursuit of a diverse and vibrant faculty in STEM disciplines. The ISU ADVANCE Program’s Comprehensive Institutional Intervention Strategy focused on four primary goals: 1. Overcome known barriers to women’s advancement across ISU STEM fields, focusing on transparency, isolation, mentoring, and career flexibility. 2. Overcome department-specific barriers to women’s advancement in STEM. 3. Increase overall participation and advancement of women faculty in senior and leadership ranks. 4. Institutionalize positive changes at the university level. The ISU ADVANCE Program included both “bottom up” and “top down” approaches. Our “bottom up” activities included department interventions that were part of the Collaborative Transformation project. We also engaged in “top down” activities that addressed policies and practices at the college and university levels. We sought to illuminate both subtle and overt impediments to equity, and to design strategies to dissolve impediments, thus transforming Iowa State University into an institution that facilitates retention and advancement of women and all underrepresented minorities. Our approach focused on transforming departmental cultures (views, attitudes, norms and shared beliefs), practices (what people say and do), and structures (physical and social arrangements), as well as university policies, through active participation of individuals at all levels of the university.
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ISU ADVANCE Collaborative Transformation Project: Rounds 1 and 2 - Focal Department Synthesis Report

ISU ADVANCE Collaborative Transformation Project: Rounds 1 and 2 - Focal Department Synthesis Report

This report summarizes research from the Iowa State University ADVANCE Collaborative Transformation (CT) Project. The results discussed here are based on intensive research conducted within six Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) departments at ISU during 2006-2009. The report also reviews some of the activities within the departments aimed at enhancing workplace climate and improving recruitment, retention and promotion of diverse faculty that have been inspired and informed by the CT Project. These activities are funded by a 5 year grant from the National Science Foundation’s ADVANCE Institutional Transformation program, which is designed to create an infrastructure for transforming structures, cultures, and practices in ways that enable and support recruitment, retention and promotion of women faculty in STEM fields. This report represents one step in an overall multistage process. The CT Project will eventually include three additional focal ISU STEM departments, a further synthesis of findings from all departments over a 5-year period, and the development and refinement of assessment tools aimed at identifying and reducing barriers to faculty scholarly success— including issues that hinder the recruitment, retention and promotion of women faculty.
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FINAL-YEAR PROJECT REPORT WRITING GUIDELINES

FINAL-YEAR PROJECT REPORT WRITING GUIDELINES

There is no hard rule about overall length because this will vary with each project depending on the nature of the work. For a B.Eng. report, approximately 120 pages, including tables and appendices is an acceptable upper limit. Ask advice from your supervisor and remember, quantity is no substitute for quality.

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Titor s Equilibrium Project Final Report

Titor s Equilibrium Project Final Report

We consider this Game Programming Class a success in every aspect. Since it was the first year it was given, we didn’t expect much help from the assistants, and in fact about two weeks after the beginning we had far more experience than them on using XNA. Though, they were very engaged and tried to fulfill our needs the best way they could. A major successful aspect of the lab was the communication. Inside the group, between the groups, and with the professor and the assistant, a lot information was exchanged, and people helped each other with good results. The professor staff immediately catched the students comments and suggestions, adapting the class to the real needs we had. This was really appreciated from our part, and helped us focussing on the project. With the lab going on, the students knew each other and shared experiences, suggesting and discussing solutions, and keeping a very cooperative and positive mood. Even in the end when there was a bit of competition, this mood didn’t change at all, and we mutually recognized the good efforts of the others.
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DRAFT Sensor Cloud Project Final Report

DRAFT Sensor Cloud Project Final Report

We propose a model for large-scale smartphone based sen- sor networks, with sensor information processed by clouds and grids, with a mediation layer for processing, filtering and other mashups done via a brokering network. Final aggregate results are assumed to be sent to users through traditional cloud interfaces such as browsers. We conjec- ture that such a network configuration will have significant sensing applications, and perform some preliminary work in both defining the system, and considering threats to the system as a whole from different perspectives. We then dis- cuss our current, initial approaches to solving three por- tions of the overall security architecture: i) Risk Analysis relating to the possession and environment of the smart- phone sensors, ii) New malware threats and defenses in- stalled on the sensor network proper, and iii) An analysis of covert channels being used to circumvent encryption in the user/cloud interface.
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Project FATIMA Final Report: Part 2

Project FATIMA Final Report: Part 2

EEF SOF Public transport infrastructure ** Low cost road capacity *** ** improvements Increase in public transport * ** frequency Reduction in public transport ** *** fares Road pricing [r]

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Project FATIMA Final Report: Part 1.

Project FATIMA Final Report: Part 1.

The objective functions used in FATIMA were arrived at through a review of current practice and future opportunities in private financing of transport, starting from the acknowledgement that public finance for transport is currently scarce. Information for the review was obtained through a literature search and from interviews with public officials, politicians and representatives of private companies. Over all the cities, nearly 40 case studies of existing and planned schemes were reviewed, covering private involvement in road and rail (especially light rail) infrastructure, terminals, traffic control and information systems, parking and public transport operation. The involvement of the private sector took the form of pure private financing and (more commonly) a variety of forms of public-private partnerships. Based on this review, the FATIMA project defined a range of objective functions to be used in the modelling process, as described below.
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The York Energy Demonstration Project: Final Report

The York Energy Demonstration Project: Final Report

• to provide the York Energy Demonstration Project with a focus for public education. York City Council could not afford to pursue these objectives in all houses in the York Energy Demonstration Project. The reasons for this were partly financial, but also included practical considerations. The 4 House Scheme required that the houses be unoccupied for a period of some three months to allow direct measurement of the effect of the insulation package that was applied, and it would have been impossible to have found 50 empty dwellings in the York stock. It was also felt that the level of tenant participation, which is an essential part of York City Council's Tenant's Choice refurbishment scheme, would have been incompatible with the need to formulate and carry out a clear programme of energy related work in these houses.
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Loan and Advance Department of DBBL

Loan and Advance Department of DBBL

The internship program is done on the purpose of learning banking more thoroughly and applies the learning in the real life situation. The project paper identifies various types of loan products and then compare these products with that of other banks. Thus, the project infers the strength and weakness of DBBL. In preparing the project, I mainly depend on the primary data; however, some information was collected from the secondary sources. To sustain in the highly competitive market, DBBL has come up with new product lines named “Life line”. The life line includes two types of products categorized as loans without security and loans with minimum security. The report summarizes the features and borrower‟s eligibility for the life line products. While comparing the interest rates of life line products with that of HSBC, it was found that DBBL is in better position. This implies that DBBL is trying to capture market share which is currently captured by HSBC. Based on the findings, some recommendations have been made in the end of the report.
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08_Sample_ Milton Consulting Project Final Report

08_Sample_ Milton Consulting Project Final Report

Although the current records management team at the City of Milton has made efforts to train department liaisons in records retention schedules by providing one-on-one training sessions and reference binders, many staff members are unsure of the records retention guidelines that apply to the records in their departments. While some departments are addressing this ambiguity by keeping everything they think might be important, other departments are potentially not keeping enough. Staff requested additional training and resources in this area to help them learn how to better manage their own records.
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CEPF FINAL PROJECT COMPLETION REPORT

CEPF FINAL PROJECT COMPLETION REPORT

Mesoamerica region, as well as to review and validate the information needed to compile the hotspot’s final report. A survey distributed to participants at both workshops indicated that 100% of respondents believed that the workshops provided them with opportunities to connect with staff from similar conservation projects; more than 84% said they are planning to collaborate with contacts made at the workshop.

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CASTT Project s Final Report

CASTT Project s Final Report

The project is dedicated to studying how wireless sensor networks can be used to collect data in real time from test vehicles, and furthermore how this data can be processed and analyzed in real-time. Previous efforts in CASTT have demonstrated how measurement data can be accessed from vehicles and transported over a combination of wireless and wired networks to an engineering site for analysis [4, 5]. To take one step further, we will now add wireless sensor networks to the picture, where the sensors and the data collection units are small built-in embedded systems.
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FireInTimber. WoodWisdom-Net Research Programme Final Report FINAL REPORT. Birgit Östman. Coordinator of the project BASIC PROJECT DATA

FireInTimber. WoodWisdom-Net Research Programme Final Report FINAL REPORT. Birgit Östman. Coordinator of the project BASIC PROJECT DATA

The project originates from a road-map study to address issues related to the limitations and barriers posed to wood and wood products by national fire regulations and fire performance issues. The pre-study was carried out by the Fire Safe Use of Wood network (FSUW) and resulted in a research project proposal to WoodWisdom-Net. The proposal was concentrated on research needs to influence regulations and the use of timber in construction, and to improve competativeness of European wood industries.

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Collaborative Project Management:

Collaborative Project Management:

It’s true that project management, by its very definition and nature, has always embraced elements of collaboration. As such, to imply that project managers have until now functioned in a kind of dictatorial vacuum, unaware and uninterested in the contributions of others, is both wrong and probably offensive. In light of this, it goes without saying that such an implication is NOT being made here. It’s unarguable that project management and collaboration have existed together since this science was born.

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New England Genetics Collaborative Annual Report for Project Year Eight

New England Genetics Collaborative Annual Report for Project Year Eight

Table 3 provides a complete list of the objectives set forth by project staff at the beginning of the project year (with modifications based on changes in the project) as well as the status of each objective as of June, 1, 2015. Measures of objective “status” relative to implementation over the course of the 5 year project are defined by the following key: 1. Completed as planned, 2. Completed - deviated substantially from plans, 3. In progress - satisfactory, 4. In progress - unsatisfactory, 5. Initiation of activity deferred, 6. Activity abandoned, 7. Not scheduled to initiate this period, 8. Insufficient documentation available. Additionally, a review is provided on the relative success of the objectives during Project Year Six. Review results are defined as:
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GAELS Project Final Report: Information environment for engineering

GAELS Project Final Report: Information environment for engineering

The results of the GAELS courseware evaluations can be interpreted in a number of ways. Firstly, if one teaching method is less successful than another, what then is an acceptable fall in reported quality of learning outcomes? A teaching method in which 72% of students report high learning outcomes cannot be judged a failure. Furthermore, there is a significant saving of resources in terms of library staff time when user education is delivered without any mediation on the part of librarian tutors. It is also important to note that information skills courseware delivered without librarian support can reach many users who would otherwise be quite unable to receive any teaching whatsoever, and still gives an educational result of acceptable quality. At a time of severe resource constraint in Higher Education the advantages of improved outreach, together with a recouping of valuable staff time are significant benefits of a courseware-based approach to information skills training that need to be weighed against any reported diminution in quality of learning outcomes.
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