Top PDF 2019 annual report on education spending in England

2019 annual report on education spending in England

2019 annual report on education spending in England

The Labour party put the cost of this package at £5.3 billion in 2021–22 (which is equivalent to £5.5 billion in today’s prices). However, IFS analysis at the time noted that this figure was highly uncertain, and was unlikely to reflect the true long-run cost of the party’s childcare package (Cattan and Farquharson, 2017). The 2020–21 figure excluded the cost of offering free or subsidised care to 1-year-olds and of extending maternity pay to 12 months. The cost of policy commitments such as ‘phasing in subsidised provision on top of free-hour entitlements’ will depend a lot on the actual programme put in place: how many hours it subsidises, at what rate of subsidy, who is eligible for the subsidies, and how many hours they choose to take up at the new, lower price. In addition, the Labour party promised higher hourly funding rates to ‘transition to a qualified, graduate-led workforce’. Ensuring that early education places are of high quality is essential if they are to support children’s development (though recent research is divided on whether a graduate-led workforce is necessary to achieve this; see footnote 20 for details). But without knowing the specific changes to the hourly funding rate that the party proposed, it is difficult to incorporate this into an independent costing of the childcare package.
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2018 Annual Report on Education Spending in England

2018 Annual Report on Education Spending in England

represents spending on the free entitlement to part-time early years education and childcare, which amounted to £3.5 billion in 2017–18. Increases in spending on the free entitlement over time have mainly reflected extensions in hours offered, with the latest extension in 2017–18 increasing the offer to 30 hours for most working parents. There are two main related challenges for early years funding over the next few years. First, successful implementation of the new 30 hours extended entitlement will require providers to be willing to offer it, given the funding available. To date, many have, but there is significant geographical variation in take-up rates. The government should therefore continue to monitor overall levels and variation in take-up of the new extended entitlement. Second, it is not clear how and whether the new Early Years National Funding Formula can be used to promote high-quality provision. Whilst the new funding system is welcome in ensuring transparency and consistency in funding allocations, it is currently difficult for the funding formula to incentivise and support high-quality provision as there is no agreed definition of ‘high-quality’ provision. A focus on minimising costs could have unintended consequences by making it more difficult for childcare settings to provide high-quality care that supports children’s development.
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Vision versus pragmatism : citizenship in the secondary school curriculum in England. Citizenship Education Longitudinal Study : fifth annual report

Vision versus pragmatism : citizenship in the secondary school curriculum in England. Citizenship Education Longitudinal Study : fifth annual report

Across all these schools, with the exception of one, student views of their citizenship lessons fall into the first column of the grid above - ‘consistently good ’. This is a positive finding, which is backed up by teachers’ own perceptions of how their students respond to citizenship lessons within these schools, as summarised by the following citizenship teacher: ‘They like the varied nature of the activities they get involved in, and the different people that come into school’. That said, in one school offering discrete citizenship lessons, both staff and students indicate that the quality of learning is variable. Some students receive very interactive lessons, whilst for others, the teaching style is much more didactic. As the citizenship coordinator commented: ‘The students enjoy it on the whole, but a lot depends on who is teaching it.’ In this school, whilst citizenship is a ‘discrete’ subject, it is not taught by a dedicated team of specialists, but rather by all form tutors. What makes for a positive teaching and learning experience for students, therefore seems to reflect less the model of delivery per se than the skills and confidence of the teachers delivering the subject. Case study data suggests that small, dedicated teams seem to be an effective means of ensuring good quality teaching and learning. Teachers in discrete delivery schools also report that it is often more difficult for lessons to be varied and interactive at Key Stage 4 than at Key Stage 3, due to the fact that students are often working towards the short course GCSE in Citizenship – most often the case in schools that deliver citizenship as a discrete subject. Staff report that the need to follow the examination board syllabi, and ensure specific subject coverage, means that there is a tendency to rely more on textbooks. Schools not working towards the GCSE short course are less likely to report this as a concern. Such findings highlight the need to remain cautious of one of the key recommendations of the recent Diversity and Citizenship Curriculum Review (DfES, 2007) that ‘citizenship works best when delivered discretely… [with] greater definition and support in place of the flexible, ‘light touch’ approach’. The analysis of this Study’s data suggests that it is clearly not this simple; a point to which this report will return in its conclusions, and which is further elaborated in the following section.
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Embedding citizenship education in secondary schools in England (2002-08) : Citizenship Education Longitudinal Study seventh annual report

Embedding citizenship education in secondary schools in England (2002-08) : Citizenship Education Longitudinal Study seventh annual report

Finally, by 2008, still further changes have been implemented in response to the on-going monitoring and review. At key stage 3, CE has begun to be delivered in every subject and through special ‘event days’, which were introduced to cover citizenship topics that were difficult to address through cross- curricular provision. This change followed the increase of curriculum time for subjects such as ICT, which in turn reduced the time and space available for CE. Meanwhile, at key stage 4, CE provision was reconfigured to be delivered in a weekly tutorial slot in addition to delivery in religious education. This weekly tutorial slot was shared by CE, careers education, and PSHE. CE is delivered after May exams in Year 10 and then in the first part of Year 11. This new arrangement was introduced because there was insufficient time in the Year 10 tutor time to cover the CE curriculum but because students become very exam-oriented in Year 11 it’s best to cover CE quickly at the beginning of Year 11 (when it is then followed by PSHE).
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Annual financial report June 30, 2019

Annual financial report June 30, 2019

We have audited, in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America and the standards applicable to financial audits contained in Government Auditing Standards, issued by the Comptroller General of the United States, the financial statements of Francis Marion University (the “University”), a component unit of the State of South Carolina, as of and for the year ended June 30, 2019, and the related notes to the financial statements, which collectively comprise the University’s basic financial statements, and have issued our report thereon dated September 19, 2019. Our report includes a reference to other auditors who audited the financial statements of the Francis Marion University Education Foundation, Inc., as described in our report on the University’s financial statements. This report does not include the results of the other auditor’s testing of internal control over financial reporting or compliance and other matters that are reported on separately by those auditors. The financial statements of the Francis Marion University Education Foundation and Francis Marion University Development Foundation were not audited in accordance with Government Auditing Standards.
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Building on Progress Towards Fair Access : annual report
2019

Building on Progress Towards Fair Access : annual report 2019

• The first criticism is the potential reduction in courses in the senior phase, a politically contentious issue that may have generated more heat than light. This has three potential issues for access to university. The first issue is that this could lead to a narrowing of choices in higher education; if courses at S4 are reduced, learners may be limited in the range of courses for which they are qualified (according to current entry criteria). A second issue is that some universities have restrictions on when qualifications are acquired, which is at odds with CfE’s philosophy that schools and pupils should have greater flexibility about the timing of qualifications across the whole senior phase and that what matters is the overall achievement of pupils at the end of S6. However, there is a counter argument that by taking a more creative approach to the senior phase schools are better preparing young people for independent study in university by giving them a wider range of experiences. Finally, schools in more deprived areas may not be able to offer as many subjects as those in more prosperous areas for a range of factors, including teacher shortages. However, this should not be exaggerated. According to analysis by ‘The Times’ in 2017, on average, schools in the least deprived areas offer 23 Higher subjects, while schools in the most deprived areas offer 17 – still a considerable choice. Overall the problem with the number of subjects appears to be not so much with Highers, which matter most to universities, as at National 5, where teacher confidence with a new qualifications remains an issue, and Advanced Highers, which can be mitigated by establishing Advanced Higher hubs;
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2019 CAPER. Consolidated Annual Performance Evaluation Report

2019 CAPER. Consolidated Annual Performance Evaluation Report

supportive housing and the township is providing funds from their affordable housing trust fund as well as from CDBG to do repairs to the building. Imani Park is now permanent supportive housing, too. Helping low-income individuals and families avoid becoming homeless, especially extremely low-income individuals and families and those who are: likely to become homeless after being discharged from publicly funded institutions and systems of care (such as health care facilities, mental health facilities, foster care and other youth facilities, and corrections programs and institutions); and, receiving assistance from public or private agencies that address housing, health, social services, employment, education, or youth needs
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REGION III EDUCATION SERVICE CENTER ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED AUGUST 31, 2019

REGION III EDUCATION SERVICE CENTER ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED AUGUST 31, 2019

As part of obtaining reasonable assurance about whether Region III Education Service Center’s financial statements are free from material misstatement, we performed tests of its compliance with certain provisions of laws, regulations, contracts, and grant agreements, noncompliance with which could have a direct and material effect on the determination of financial statement amounts. However, providing an opinion on compliance with those provisions was not an objective of our audit, and accordingly, we do not express such an opinion. The results of our tests disclosed no instances of noncompliance or other matters that are required to be reported under Government Auditing Standards.
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2019 Annual Public Health Services Public Report

2019 Annual Public Health Services Public Report

Health equity is created when individuals have the fair opportunity to reach their full health potential. Achieving health equity involves reducing unnecessary and avoidable differences that are unfair and unjust such as those related to income, social status, race, gender, education, and the physical environment. Public Health Services implements specific initiatives to reach priority populations who are most at risk for negative health outcomes and more likely to benefit from health interventions. The goal is for all residents of Hamilton to attain full health potential without disadvantage due to the social determinants of health.
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Long-Run Trends in School Spending in England: IFS Report R115

Long-Run Trends in School Spending in England: IFS Report R115

Over the following 15 years, the cumulative secondary/primary ratio rose and then fell dramatically, despite the annual spending ratio remaining constant. In the early 2000s, growth in both primary and secondary school annual spending began to accelerate significantly. Students taking their GCSEs in the early 2000s experienced successively higher levels of secondary school spending, while the amount of primary expenditure they had received in the late 1990s had only grown slowly. This resulted in the observed rise in the secondary/primary expenditure ratio. Such an effect can only ever be temporary. Eventually cohorts who also benefited from the fast growth in primary school expenditure take their GCSEs and, indeed, the secondary/primary expenditure ratio gradually began to fall from 2007 onwards. The same effect is likely to cause the secondary/primary ratio to fall further after 2016, when subsequent cohorts receive lower levels of secondary expenditure although their primary expenditure was unaffected as they finished primary school before the cuts began.
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Annual Report 2019 WAITE RESEARCH INSTITUTE. adelaide.edu.au/wri

Annual Report 2019 WAITE RESEARCH INSTITUTE. adelaide.edu.au/wri

The Waite Research Institute (WRI) was established to deliver on the vision and legacy of Peter Waite by supporting The University of Adelaide’s commitment to agricultural research, development and education. The Waite brand carries an iconic status world- wide, synonymous with research of the highest quality, focused on innovation in the Agricultural sector. It is one of seven University institutes that focus on areas of strength and excellence. The WRI supports our members who are drawn primarily from the University’s agriculturally focused campuses at Waite and Roseworthy, but also researchers from all other Faculties of the University including Health, Engineering, Professions and Arts. A great strength of agricultural research on the university campuses is the co-location of leading independent research organisations inclucing CSIRO, the Australian Wine Research Institute (AWRI), the South Australian Research
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annual report plus January 2019 through June 2020

annual report plus January 2019 through June 2020

Calendar year 2019 to the date of this report marked over a year of constant growth, learning and improvements at Elephant Havens Wildlife Foundation. As we often mention, although we have accomplished much, we couldn’t have done it without our donors. With your support and donations, one of the first initiatives identified by the Foundation - the Elephant Havens orphanage in Botswana - is now an absolute reality. It is a true engine for wildlife preser- vation, local employment, education, community development and habitat preservation. Goals have been met, new goals have been formulated and the continuing missions will be expanded, streamlined, improved and main- tained. We proudly and with gratefulness and humility address all of that in this report.
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LGBT Action Plan : annual progress report 2018 to 2019

LGBT Action Plan : annual progress report 2018 to 2019

Dysphoria Clinics to act as National Trans Health Units, with responsibility for managing a national network of gender dysphoria clinics. NHS England has also begun the process of identifying a number of locations across England that will offer an extended delivery model by trained healthcare professionals in local health settings, including sexual health services and primary care. NHS England will also fund the Royal College of Physicians to develop the United Kingdom’s first accredited training course in gender medicine, which will begin accepting recruits in 2019 to 2020. This summer the Government Equalities Office is commissioning research which will explore the nature of adolescents transitioning gender, how this has changed over time, and the reasons for the increase in adolescents, particularly natal girls, wanting to transition.
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Barraba Central School 2019 Annual Report

Barraba Central School 2019 Annual Report

During the external validation process, an independent panel consisting of a Principal School Leadership and a peer principal considered our evidence and assessment of our school's progress against the School Excellence Framework. Our self–assessment and the external validation process will assist the school to refine our school plan, leading to further improvements in the delivery of education to our students.

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Education in England: annual report 2016

Education in England: annual report 2016

In recent years, a key aspect of the debate has been the relative success of London pupils. As our analysis shows, certain ethnic groups and those who are registered as having English as an additional language do better than others, so perhaps it is no wonder that London with its large ethnic mix does better than anywhere else in the country. Research by Simon Burgess at the University of Bristol suggests that London’s success in GCSE scores and progress from the end of Key Stage 2 is largely attributable to its ethnic composition. 49 However, another recent report by the LSE attributes London’s
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Education in England : Annual report 2019

Education in England : Annual report 2019

Sara Bonetti is Associate Director of Early Years at the Education Policy Institute. Prior to joining EPI, Sara spent ten years working in the early years sector in the United States. She led data collection efforts on topics such as funding and workforce professional development and conducted analyses on areas such as educational leadership and systems integration. Sara’s background also includes almost ten years in the field of international development. Sara has a doctorate in Educational Leadership with a focus on early childhood education from Mills College, in Oakland, California. Whitney Crenna-Jennings is a Senior Researcher for Mental health, Wellbeing and Inclusion at the Education Policy Institute. Whitney is the principle author of the publication, ‘Vulnerable children and social care in England: a review of the evidence’. Before joining EPI, Whitney graduated with an MSc in Social Epidemiology from UCL in 2015.
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Education in England: Annual Report 2018

Education in England: Annual Report 2018

It is also crucial to understand what the trends are in closing the disadvantaged gap – an objective shared by almost all policymakers and education commentators. Over recent years, and contrary to the perceptions of some, there has been a closing of the gap on most measures. This closure has taken place over a period of 20 years during which education and social policy has had a strong focus on improving opportunities and reducing the inequalities in social outcomes. A concern from this year’s report is the apparent significant slowdown in the rate of gap closure, against a background of rising child poverty and financial pressures on many of the services which vulnerable children
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Annual report of the Department of Education and Skills, 2013

Annual report of the Department of Education and Skills, 2013

I welcome the publication of the 2013 Annual Report which provides an insight into the diverse work undertaken by the Department during the year and highlights its important multi-faceted role in contributing to Irish society. I am pleased to acknowledge the achievements of the Department in 2013 and, in particular, the on-going progress which has been made by it and its agencies in implementing the extensive programme of reform throughout the education sector. The establishment of SOLAS, together with the re-structuring and streamlining of the VEC system through the establishment of the Education and Training Boards, represents the most significant change in the training sector since the establishment of FAS itself over 25 years ago. The State is investing significant resources in the further education and training sector in recognition of the necessity to build a vibrant, efficient and effective skills, training and further education sector that is well integrated into the overall education and training system.
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Annual Report July 1, 2019 to June 30, 2020

Annual Report July 1, 2019 to June 30, 2020

 OMG Women in Ag Event –On September 10, 2019, the 6th Annual Osage, Maries & Gasconade (OMG) Counties Women in Ag Event was held at the White Mule Winery with the theme of “Locally Grown.” The committee for this event included staff from FSA, NRCS, SWCD, and Extension from all three counties. Sponsorship funds were received from many different sources. There were 265 registered attendees. The meal that was prepared by the White Mule Winery was outstanding. Our speakers were Brenda Van Booven with Tunnel Vision, Susan Mills-Gray with Preserving the Harvest, and Sharon Oetting – Life on the Farm. The 2020 event is was cancelled due to COVID-19.
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Department of Education and Science Annual Report 2000

Department of Education and Science Annual Report 2000

The OECD International Adult Literacy Survey: Results for Ireland was published in 1997, showing some 25% of Irish adults scoring at the bottom literacy level. It is important to stress that this was not a survey of illiteracy, but rather of the different levels of skills that are needed for participation in a modern economy. Those adults who were found to score at the lowest level (Level 1) could perform, at best, tasks that required the reader to locate a simple piece of information in a text, with no distracting information. The survey showed early school leavers, older adults and the unemployed as being most at risk of literacy difficulties, with participation in adult education and training being least likely for those with the poorest skills.
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