Top PDF Art: Data to Wisdom – Creating and Managing Knowledge

Art: Data to Wisdom – Creating and Managing Knowledge

Art: Data to Wisdom – Creating and Managing Knowledge

• Work performance data is the raw observations and measurements made during the execution of the project work; for example an activity is 25% complete. Data on its own has little direct value, but knowing the accuracy of the data underpins everything else is it exactly 25% or approximately 25% complete?

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DBee: A Database for Creating and Managing Knowledge Graphs and Embeddings

DBee: A Database for Creating and Managing Knowledge Graphs and Embeddings

Current machine learning systems such as Keras (Chollet et al., 2015), and PyTorch (Paszke et al., 2017) focus mostly on exposing their user to the definition of neural architectures, abstracting away the computation details of automatic differentia- tion - or trying to learn even those (Jin et al., 2018) - with TensorFlow (Abadi et al., 2016) being the most complete suite providing assistance from data streaming, over training to model serving. Our approach can be seen as complementary to these efforts since we aim to provide the infrastructure to extract, represent and query structured and unstruc- tured data (with an emphasis on KGs from text and associated embeddings).
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Creating Perception, the First Person Perspective in Neuro Art

Creating Perception, the First Person Perspective in Neuro Art

Let me consider this irreducibility of third-person and first-person data more extensively. We can say that third-person data are data about the performance of mental functions. We can for example observe how a neuron runs from a subject’s eye to her brain. From this, we can deduce how a light signal triggers her retina and travels through the neuron to the visual cortex. From this, we derive an understanding of the mental function of vision. In principal, all third-person questions are questions about the performance of functions. While not to be underestimated, these questions are merely technical. From the third-person view, consciousness is an extremely complex but essentially understandable physical system. To explain third-person phenomena, we have to explain the objective functioning of the mechanisms that performs those phenomena. It may take another hundred years to untangle these mechanisms but ultimately it is about biological matter abiding to physical laws. What makes the hard part of the mind-body problem really hard is that it goes beyond the problems about performance of functions. The enigma in the duality of first- and third-person data lies in the fact that first-person phenomena seem to resist any explanation from the third person. We cannot understand and explain first-person experience from a third-person view. First-person data are not reducible to third-person data. David Chalmers adopts this irreducibility of first- to third-person phenomena from Thomas Nagel. Nagel explains that first-person phenomena cannot be fully understood from a functional explanation. This irreducibility derives from the fact that every subjective phenomenon is essentially connected to a single point of view. 39 An objective, physical theory will inevitably abandon that point of view. He illustrates this by showing the impossibility of human knowledge over what it is like to be a bat. We cannot understand the consciousness of a bat
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Managing Complexity For Creating Breakthrough Inventions: Focusing On Collaboration Teams And Prior Art

Managing Complexity For Creating Breakthrough Inventions: Focusing On Collaboration Teams And Prior Art

Second, collaboration teams can have more rigorous screening processes for invention than lone inventors (Singh & Fleming, 2010). Based on diverse knowledge and experience within collaboration teams, some team members are more likely to recall that they created inventions technologically similar to their current invention. And they can suggest to abandon or modify current invention approaches based on the outcomes of the past inventions. Thus, with more rigorous screening processes, collaboration teams can abandon or modify seemingly less fruitful configurations of knowledge components ex ante. Because the reducing number of unnecessary combination tries can ease inventors’ burden of conducting complex inventing (Fleming & Sorenson, 2004), the increasing size of collaboration teams is likely to weaken the negative effect of complexity from recombining highly coupled components. Thus, we suggest:
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Lesson 4. Wisdom. The fear of the LORD is the beginning of wisdom, and the knowledge of the Holy One is understanding (Proverbs 9:10).

Lesson 4. Wisdom. The fear of the LORD is the beginning of wisdom, and the knowledge of the Holy One is understanding (Proverbs 9:10).

Part of the Bible is specifically designed as wisdom literature. Books such as Job, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and many of the psalms are works of wisdom literature. The book of Proverbs is the most direct in its references to wisdom. This book contains a limitless supply of wisdom for virtually any situation, decision, or plan we face.

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Managing Knowledge in Shared Spaces

Managing Knowledge in Shared Spaces

The main argument of our paper is that a shared space is essential for knowledge creation and enhancing the effectiveness of knowledge combination for business advantages. Physically shared space represents close proximity and allows sharing of emotions and sentiments. Cognitively shared space does not necessarily require close proximity, except sharing a broad premise. Those who are part of cognitively shared space must think along the shared premise and be able to share some common language. The commonality of language eases problems of translation and communication while contributing to the development of cognitively-based com- munities of practice. Technically shared space is more tuned toward sharing of explicit knowledge to a commu- nity of practitioners. Although sharing knowledge technically can provide the advantages of efficiency, it can create the problems in making the sense of knowledge. Therefore, where knowledge is impersonal and can be represented in blue-prints, technical means can be quite useful in capturing and transferring such kind of know- ledge. On the other hand, where knowledge is sticky and deals with personal values and directly relates to hu- man, technical means, in addition, require the use of physical means and cognitive means for sharing knowledge [32].
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MANAGING EPILEPSY WELL NETWORK PUTTING COLLECTIVE WISDOM TO WORK FOR PEOPLE WITH EPILEPSY

MANAGING EPILEPSY WELL NETWORK PUTTING COLLECTIVE WISDOM TO WORK FOR PEOPLE WITH EPILEPSY

HOBSCOTCH (HOme-Based Self-management and COgnitive Training CHanges Lives) is a program designed to address memory and attention problems among people with epilepsy through a combination of in-person visits, telephone calls, and a gaming device. Approximately half of people who experience seizures report more difficulties with memory than people without seizures. Reasons for memory loss may include medications, stress, brain structure, brain chemistry, and brain activity. Through HOBSCOTCH, each participant selects one specific memory problem per week and uses a strategy to cope with the problem. The gaming device is designed to be a fun, inexpensive way to improve memory for adults with epilepsy and does not require Internet access. The program is currently being tested for effectiveness, which will include measures of quality of life, memory perceptions, and memory function. Researchers will also determine if the program increases knowledge and skills related to epilepsy self-management.
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Managing paradox in a world of knowledge

Managing paradox in a world of knowledge

Peter Drucker (1981) observed something very interesting about Japan. It is a society built on tense polarities. Thus, while it is a society that admires strong institutional consensus, it also has a long history of ruthless economic competition and militant, even violent, industrial relations. It has seen purist Shintō fascism coexist with tranquil Buddhist pacifism. It is a leading capitalist nation with a prolonged tradition of socialist parties. Drucker’s point is that the tensions of Japanese society are polarities, not contradictions. If these were contradictions, they could be resolved one way or the other. Observing this, Drucker makes the crucial point: one should not expect radical polarities of this kind ever to be overcome. Versions of them will coexist in perpetual tension. This is an important observation because it goes a long way to understanding why Japan is a creative society. Like creative personalities, creative societies internalise deep, unresolvable polarisations. That’s the source of their creativity. Such polarities would be self-destructive were it not for the power of aesthetics. Whether we are talking about the self, the firm, or society, creativity is characterised by the capacity to combine opposites (Ward et. al, 45-50) into schemas and models (50-56). It is art (the art of fine arts, the art of science and technology, the art of aesthetic rituals, the art of the firm) that produces the schemas and the models. In the aesthetic act, in the quest for beauty (from the beauty of landscape to the beauty of the machine) polarities are combined, scaled, and integrated but are never overcome. That is why societies that are creative internalise high levels of paradox. They appear to others, and sometimes they appear to themselves, to be enigmatic.
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Difficult art of managing company s reputation

Difficult art of managing company s reputation

Effectively managing reputational capital is perhaps of even greater significance within Asian economies within which building trusting business relationships is a key driver of business success. At the same time, Asian companies are thought to lag their western counterparts in relation to developing strategies for managing their reputations.

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Creating a Body of Knowledge for cartography

Creating a Body of Knowledge for cartography

In order to create the BoK and for it to be useful, such polarized views of the nature of knowledge must be recognized, whilst acknowledging that the document created will draw from educational and practical experiences in a wide range of learning environments. Further, the nature of knowledge involves several specific reflections: in cartography (and in most other disciplines), for example, the data handled possesses uncertainty and vagueness, and the methods for and need to efficiently handle such information must be incorporated into the BoK. Further, there is a range of ‘troublesome knowledge’ – ideas which appear counter-intuitive or difficult to grasp. This is associated with the idea of ‘threshold concepts’ – the acquisition of knowledge which cannot be ‘unlearned’ and which, once successfully tackled (thresholds often define ‘difficult’ material), can be used to build upon for future learning. Knowledge may also be contested and subject to debate. Identifying key threshold concepts could help to form ideal ‘stepping stones’, milestones and targets in an educational curriculum.
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MANAGING KNOWLEDGE ASSETS FOR COMPETITIVENESS IN THE KNOWLEDGE ERA

MANAGING KNOWLEDGE ASSETS FOR COMPETITIVENESS IN THE KNOWLEDGE ERA

• Most economies are knowledge-based, in that the major source of growth and wealth is found in knowledge-based assets. The economy is concentrated on intangibles rather than tangibles. In terms of output this means a predominance of knowledge-intensive services over goods. In terms of inputs, this means that the primary assets of companies are intangibles, such as human, organizational, and relationship capital, rather than physical capital, such as land, machines, inventories and financial assets. Moreover, technology as a stock of knowledge almost completely trumps: the abundance of natural resources; the proximity to international markets and regional economic integrations and the financial assets. Knowledge has become companies’ key strategic resource, the new dominant driver of their profitability, competitiveness and long-term expansion and domination on the market;
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Creating Environments Through the Art of Occupational Therapy

Creating Environments Through the Art of Occupational Therapy

believes that working as part of an interprofessional team is the best way to create a space that addresses multi-dimensional aspects; specifically, creating therapeutic gardens and living environments to promote well-being. Lori’s research is currently focused on examining the value of outdoor garden spaces and indoor nature spaces for residents in senior living and in memory care.

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Creating Islamic art with interactive geometry software

Creating Islamic art with interactive geometry software

Geometrical designs are rampantly manifested in the Islamic architecture, in particular in mosques and public buildings. Because many Islamic scholars disapprove the artistic representation of humans and animalls, Islamic art has been evolved around geometrical designs and calligraphy. The ancient designs have survived several centuries in monuments like Taj Mahal in India and Alhambra in Spain. The work on this line of designs are still carried out by contemporary designers especially in interior and on the exterior surfaces of mosques, carpet designs and pages of the Holy Quran. Obviously, geometry is a branch of mathematics that are widely applied and appreciated in the Muslim world which also has been spread out in the art of European designers. Since mathematics is a human activity, logically it should be taught emphasizing on the human activities surrounding the mathematical knowledge.
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Managing Knowledge as Business Rules

Managing Knowledge as Business Rules

In today’s business environment, it is a certainty that will manage to survive especially those organizations which are striving to adapt quickly and with low costs to the new demands of market competition. Knowledge represented by internal business rules of an organization can help crystallize their orientation in order to ensure a competitive advantage in the market. In this context and in a relatively short time, a new trend in software development has arisen, ex- tending current methods and putting a strong emphasis on business rules. This article outlines the importance of managing business rules in an organized manner using dedicated software products and furthermore presents a general prototype for a business rules repository.
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THE KNOWLEDGE CREATING PROCESS IN MEME EVOLUTION

THE KNOWLEDGE CREATING PROCESS IN MEME EVOLUTION

Based on the results of the Florence Renaissance, the ideas of Renaissance spread and spread throughout Italy and many European countries, such as Germany, France, England, Spain, the Netherlands and other countries , producing many new achievements and impacting profoundly the social life. In the art of painting, a group of outstanding realistic art masters, such as Leonardo Da Finch, Michelangelo, Rafael, Titian, came into play in Italy. So did Mannerist painter Greco in Spanish, portrait masters Rembrandt in Netherland; In natural sciences, the modern revolution of science and technology took place. Based on the technological achievements from Arabia, China and Byzantine, and on the traditional scientific achievements from Aristotle, Platon, Euclid et al. ,mathematics, physics, astronomy, geography, geology, biology, medicine, architecture, etc. gained considerable development; Technologically, new mechanical clock and gear was developed; Military technology and navigation technology also achieved fruitful results. These achievements were directly related to the actual needs of the society, such as astronomy, geography, and navigation technology, to meet the needs of ocean exploration; medicine to cure the Black Death in Europe etc.. In the late Renaissance, establishment of new scientific methodology and experimental methods, opened up a broad road for creation of scientific and technological achievements; The humanities also began to develop in branch . Philosophy, history, literature, politics, economics, linguistics and so on, achieved fruitful results. Take "On Prince" from Machiavelli for example. Based on the realistic need to establish a unified state in Italy, it specifically analysed the specific issues in social practice, and separated the political behavior from ethical behavior, and made politics become an independent political knowledge, implementing Da Finch‟s principle "Experience Is the Mother of the Truth", denial of the divine right of kings. There were other important achievements, such as German utopian socialism and Spinoza's theory of the state and so on (Liu, Zhu& Li,2010).
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Creating innovative art spaces that transform people and places

Creating innovative art spaces that transform people and places

development and redevelopment strategies. In doing so, the resulting arts activities and spaces rejuvenate neighborhoods in need of investment, attract residents, visit[r]

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Knowledge Loss: Managing Local Knowledge in Rural Uzbekistan

Knowledge Loss: Managing Local Knowledge in Rural Uzbekistan

As lament able as t he loss of indigenous know ledge is, t he more import ant issue now is prevent ing t he cont inued know ledge loss w hich is not being mat ched by development s in t [r]

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Art Production and Social Knowledge

Art Production and Social Knowledge

The societal struggles of the late sixties and seventies, including the rally call of feminist theories, ignited a break from the inter-relationship of the heroic artist, object-viewer, art-market/ gallery system. Collective and collaborative enterprises evolved into a variety of practices that interfaced elements in new ways. A search was undertaken for new methods of production that tested limits and offered new models of artistic identity, materials, artistic spaces, and audience participation. Collectives such as “Guerrilla Girls,” a changing group of women with long-term members who wear gorilla masks, interfaced with the public anonymously. Guer- rilla Girls‟ members are female, but men can support their endeavours. The group works to bring attention to issues of gender and racial inequality in the art world. Their exhibitions and staged events are educational and foster awareness.
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Mapping Knowledge Networks in Organizations: Creating a Knowledge Mapping Instrument

Mapping Knowledge Networks in Organizations: Creating a Knowledge Mapping Instrument

As an exploratory study to find suitable approximations, we worked with three data collection techniques in whose intersection we anticipated finding our approximation. (These are shown in figure 1.) The first involved collecting social network data to augment organizational structure and working relationship data we had already collected. To do this we adapted the successive pile sort method to accommodate larger groups (Boster, 1986; Boster and Johnson, 1989). The second (further discussed below) was an effort to construct a Knowledge Mapping Instrument (KMI) to capture a rough “snapshot” of the current knowledge state of the group. This snapshot would yield an understanding of the expertise topology within the organization, a reasonable approximation of the organization’s knowledge network. The third was an evaluation of what people knew about each other. For this we asked each participant to provide the anticipated KMI score for his or her colleagues, providing a rough ranking.
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Drawing on experience: mature students and practical wisdom in art and design higher education.

Drawing on experience: mature students and practical wisdom in art and design higher education.

The paper reports on the initial findings of a longitudinal study (2011-2015) about post-Access to HE students’ experiences as they undertake their degrees in art and design. These mature students are described as ‘non-traditional’ because they are from diverse backgrounds and have entered higher education with an Access to HE Diploma qualification rather than the usual ‘A’ level route (Hudson, 2009;Burke, 2002, p.81). Post-Access students may look visibly different due to age, race, gender, disability; may act differently due to social class, religious backgrounds or previous experiences. They are often in the minority within an art and design programme and at risk of being ‘othered’ by art and design pedagogic discourses and practices (Hatton, 2012; Atkinson, 2002).
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