Top PDF Assessable case based activities: towards student centred teaching in information systems

Assessable case based activities: towards student centred teaching in information systems

Assessable case based activities: towards student centred teaching in information systems

In order to consider whether or not using these activities could indicate an approach to teaching, the educator’s conception of teaching (also called understanding of subject matter) as noted in Kember and Kwan (2000), Leveson (2004) and Prosser et al. (2005) is explored. These three papers hold the lower orders of conception as being focussed on the knowledge involved. There is also agreement about the higher orders of conception as being about facilitating learning. In Modelling Business Decisions the three cases were developed to encourage learning by doing, engaging students in the process of learning by requiring involvement. However this does not mesh clearly with Kember and Kwan’s study which elucidates higher order conceptions as meeting student’s learning needs or personal intellectual development (2000, p 483-484). The cases specifically target the development of concepts, through engaging in the process of modelling three times. This indicates a conception of learning at about the mid- point of Leveson’s scale (2004, p. 536). Requiring activities which focus on concepts but as a coherent whole seems to fit in the mid-point of Prosser et al.’s experiences of understanding (2005, p. 142).
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Teaching bioinformatics: A student-centred and problem based approach

Teaching bioinformatics: A student-centred and problem based approach

In the beginning of the genomics era, bioinformatics was mainly concerned with the creation and maintenance of databases to store digitised biological information, such as nucleotide and amino acid sequences. Development of these types of databases involved not only design issues, but also the development of complex interfaces whereby researchers could both access existing data, and submit new or revised data (e.g. to the NCBI, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/). More recently, emphasis has shifted towards the questions of how to analyse large data sets, particularly those stored in different formats in different databases. Ultimately, however, integration is needed (e.g. Chicurel 2002) in order to form a comprehensive picture of normal cellular and sub-cellular activities, so that researchers may study how these activities are globally regulated. The actual process of analysing and interpreting digitised biological data is often referred to as
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Five teacher profiles in student-centred curricula based on their conceptions of learning and teaching

Five teacher profiles in student-centred curricula based on their conceptions of learning and teaching

centredness’ contains eight items focusing on how impor- tant the respondent perceives his role as a teacher to be. In the list below we provide some examples of this scale. The scale ‘appreciation of active learning’ encompasses five items on the conceptions about active learning of stu- dents, in small group learning environments. Key compo- nents in this scale are how the teachers value students discussing the learning material, elaborating on and inter- preting information instead of just absorbing knowledge [25]. The third COLT-scale ‘orientation to professional practice’ is composed of five items directed at the integra- tion of future professional practice in the first three years of undergraduate medical education. This might be im- portant to motivate students for deep learning activities and encapsulating theoretical knowledge for future prac- tice (see below).
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Student responses to the introduction of case-based learning and practical activities into a theoretical obstetrics and gynaecology teaching programme

Student responses to the introduction of case-based learning and practical activities into a theoretical obstetrics and gynaecology teaching programme

believe that this "banking concept of education" that Freire [10] refers to is conclusively condemned to history. On the other hand, the teaching concept of meaningful learning calls for linkage between the roles of universities, health care administrators and social services. It suggests that there should be co-operation in the selection of con- tent, production of knowledge and development of pro- fessional competence. In meaningful learning, the teacher is no longer the main source of information, but the facil- itator of the teaching-learning process. The teacher's aim is to stimulate the learner to take on an active, critical and reflective attitude in the knowledge building process. The content dealt with must have the potential to be meaning- ful (functionality and relevance for professional practice), giving value to matters that are pertinent and correlatable with students' cognitive structure. However, the absorp- tion by students of knowledge of the so-called basic sub- jects in this context presents a great challenge [11]. The curricular directives for medical courses (Report 583/ 01, of August 7, 2001) from the Brazilian National Educa- tion Council (part of the Ministry of Education) give guid- ance on the changes to be made to the teaching model for courses. They indicate that courses must involve students in practical activities from the outset and promote active integration between health care service users and profes- sionals from the beginning of their instruction, using methodology which reinforces students' active participa- tion in knowledge-building, thereby bridging the gap between academic medical learning and the social needs of Brazilian health care. It is evident that the new curricu- lar directives have used the concepts and logic of problem- based learning as their reference point. They have been based on various American and European curricula that, over the past decade, have been giving emphasis to free time for self-study instead of traditional lectures [12-14]. Thus, more than half of the medical schools in the United States are at present undergoing a process of curricular reform [15], as are a large proportion of the medical schools in the United Kingdom [16,17].
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A Student Centred Experience at a Brazilian Summer Course for Student Teachers

A Student Centred Experience at a Brazilian Summer Course for Student Teachers

Self- and co-regulation skills are really important for students to be able to manage their time and effort focused on studies, thus increasing involvement and decreasing drop-outs (Hailikari & Parpala, 2014). Actions that can help the development of self- and co-regulation skills include collaborative learning and self- and peer-assessment (Räisänen, Postareff, & Lindblom-Ylänne (2016). Re- garding assessments, David (2017) cites a pedagogical student-centred expe- rience where open-ended group activities promoted more students participation on discussion about real-life situations. Due to the fact that grades were given upon participation, students felt stimulated to share their thoughts, not worrying about being right or wrong. This posture made possible for students to practice hypothesizing and also that misconceptions and inaccuracies were known and better understood.
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Technology and Student Learning: Towards a Learner-Centered Teaching Model

Technology and Student Learning: Towards a Learner-Centered Teaching Model

Teachers should go beyond the cultural mismatch theory (Sowers, 2004) to ensure high expectations for all learners as well as ensure that those expectations are realized. Some of the strategies to realize effective learn- ing for each learner include: (a) having teachers and students work together; (b) developing language and literacy skills across the curriculum; (c) con- necting lessons to students’ lives; (d) engaging students in challenging les- sons; and (e) emphasizing dialogue over lectures (doherty, hilberg, Pinal, & Tharp, 2003). It is important for teachers to understand themselves first as learners, before they can assist their students to recognize their unique learning patterns. in addition, teachers need to identify connections between their own teaching patterns and their students’ diverse learning styles.
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Learning- and child-centred teaching methods

Learning- and child-centred teaching methods

Students are more motivated to engage in learning when they experience positive emotions towards learning activities.. Students direct their attention away from learning when they exp[r]

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Development of Student Centred Knowledge Management System Based in a Higher Education Institution

Development of Student Centred Knowledge Management System Based in a Higher Education Institution

acquire tacit and explicit knowledge from other individuals. According to Awad & Ghaziri (2004), the goal of knowledge sharing is to narrow the gap between what members know and what members do. In learning organizations, knowledge sharing system may support the sharing and reuse organizational knowledge and existing systems. The main purpose of KM system is to share knowledge. ―KM is the combination of people, processes, and technology that come together to promote a robust system of information sharing, while guiding organizations toward ongoing reflexivity and learning‖ (Metcalfe, 2006). Knowledge sharing is a requirement for knowledge transfer for competitive advantage after knowledge is captured, codified, tested, and deployed. It makes visible what is now known. In HEIs, there are many ways to share knowledge with individuals by IT support. For example, lectures upload the notes or past exam papers on their own website, then students download it. Students can ask to help with lectures by email. Students can communicate and ask to solve problems by blog or forum. Dignum (2002) identified the possibilities situation of share knowledge between owners and seekers.
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Towards Services-Based Enterprise Architecture for Cloud Computing-Opened Information Systems

Towards Services-Based Enterprise Architecture for Cloud Computing-Opened Information Systems

researcher viewpoints, experiences, and contexts. Indeed, defining the IS as a Work System is considered to be the most appropriate definition [1]. This definition allows identifying the components of an IS and eliminates any confusion with a computer system [2]. S. Alter defines the Work System as "a system in which human participants and/or machines perform work (processes and activities) using information, technology, and other resources to produce specific products and/or services for specific internal and/or external customers." [1]. Fig. 1 illustrates the components of a work system. The IS is defined as a work system whose internal functions are limited to treating the information by running six types of operations, which are capture, transmit, store, retrieve, manipulate, and display the information. An IS produces information, assists, or automates the work performed by other work systems [3]. In other words, an IS is a work system whose processes and activities are devoted to the information treatment, namely the capture, the transmission, the storage, the retrieval, the manipulation, and the display of information [3].
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The Effect of Academic Information Systems and Library Information Systems upon Quality Information Systems and Student Trust as an Intervening Variable

The Effect of Academic Information Systems and Library Information Systems upon Quality Information Systems and Student Trust as an Intervening Variable

University libraries incessantly endeavor to offer better and more useful services to meet users’ dynamic needs using the modern technologies [9, 8]. Whilst marketing techniques and methods are used in academic libraries worldwide, the spread of marketing in Greek academic libraries proved to be limited. Basic operational problems were identified as the main barrier to greater uptake. Nevertheless, the majority of Greek academic librarians realize the importance of marketing, but they still have a long way to go in terms of understanding and adopting marketing concepts in their provision of services [4]. As in American and UK academic libraries, technology will continue to change library services and required skills in Jamaica [5]. However, it is interesting to note that only 40 percent contend that technology continues to drive much of the futuristic thinking in their library, raising questions as to what else drives their futuristic thinking. Also, libraries will be monitoring the success of open source integrated library systems software. However, while social networking tools can help libraries go where their users are, some academic librarians see challenges in determining which tools to use, how much resources to devote to them and how to assess their effectiveness.
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Management of a student centred online environment

Management of a student centred online environment

The environment provided in the early years of study exposes students to mechanisms that enable them to take charge of their own learning progress. This environment may be categorised as exogenous (based on Moshman (1982)'s constructivist categories) and is characterised by recognition of the value of direct instruction, but with increased learner control. This model requires opportunity for putting knowledge into practice through the use of quizzes, multiple choice and the like to provide feedback (Dalgarno 1996). Two infrastructure tools are used extensively in this environment.

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Teachers’ conceptions of learning and teaching in student-centred medical curricula: the impact of context and personal characteristics

Teachers’ conceptions of learning and teaching in student-centred medical curricula: the impact of context and personal characteristics

As not much is known yet in the literature about the re- lation between contextual and personal factors that might influence teachers’ conceptions of learning and teaching, we used an exploratory study design. Because we were interested in individual experiences and not pri- marily in a group experience of a phenomenon, we de- cided not to use a phenomenographic approach [24]. We preferred an exploratory study design over ethnog- raphy as we were interested in the meanings that indi- vidual teachers attached to teaching context and personal characteristics, in relation to their conceptions of learning and teaching, rather than in their actions [25]. It was not our intent to reveal one absolute truth for all teachers, but to explore individual meanings. This is in line with a constructivist paradigm. Constructivism emphasizes that there is no absolute truth shared by all and that ‘the reality we perceive is constructed by our social, historical, and individual contexts’ ([26], p. 405).
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Activity Based Learning System in Higher Education: A Student Centred Approach

Activity Based Learning System in Higher Education: A Student Centred Approach

Constructivism makes teachers design activities and projects to be offered to the students. These may consist on service-learning and community-based projects and activities to involve students. Use of constructivist approach in education has direct effects on students learning. They are active stake holders in the process of knowledge construction and its dissemination. They participate in teaching learning process and assume responsibility of their learning by giving it their own meaning in their respective contexts. Constructivism offers students opportunities of cooperative and collaborative learning. A study was conducted by Santmire, Giraud, & Grosskopf (1999) and compared learning achievement of two groups of elementary school students. The researchers found that the students who learned through social-constructivist approach to education and took a standardized test secured higher grades than their counterparts who were instructed traditionally in the classroom.
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Information and Cognitive Activities of a Student As a way to Interact with the New Information Reality

Information and Cognitive Activities of a Student As a way to Interact with the New Information Reality

kinds of educational problems. The process of such problems solving helps pupils to get an integrative complex of activity-related skills, the development and improvement of which effect on the success of mastering and IGA implementation quality. The peculiarity of problem tasks proposed to the pupils is that while working on them the key activities alternation of the IGA system takes place. At an appropriate stage of problem solving one of the active processes is put forward to the first position, while others don’t disappear, and temporarily move into the category of background. During your transition to the next stage of problem solving, the disposition of activity processes is changing, and other activities, which previously created a background for the implemented process, are becoming priority. Thus, the problem situation acts as a start for the thinking process (start of mental activity); in the next stage, when you define the problem, its formulation and search for the possible, the information activities process is becoming a priority. When you test the hypotheses and select the most appropriate variant of the decision, the design and research activities (the process of designing, research and modeling) come on the first positions. Thus, the solution of problem tasks integrates all three key activity processes.
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On-line case discussion assessment in Ultrasound: The effect on student centred and inter-professional learning

On-line case discussion assessment in Ultrasound: The effect on student centred and inter-professional learning

implemented within health care education it is important to incorporate a student rule setting session at the outset to ensure ownership of the discussion forum and produce student negotiated rules, to help reduce competition and develop a collaborative learning forum. There was an even split between students thinking the discussions lacked focus “a little” (45.5%) and those who thought “not at all” (45.5%), with one respondent replying “not a lot” to that question. Staff were unable to compare the responses to the actual discussion cases, because of the anonymous nature of the questionnaire. From the markers perspective some cases were well structured, clearly related to the case discussion and interesting to read, whilst others lacked focus and direction at times. The role of the facilitator and the guidance provided for peer facilitation is an area for lecturers to consider, when introducing students to this method of learning.
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Student Centred Design of a Learning Analytics System

Student Centred Design of a Learning Analytics System

The first version of the LA tool was launched in October 2017 on 2 first semester modules (see Section 4 for more details). After the end of the semester, 10 one-on-one evaluation sessions were car- ried out in collaboration with the student ambassadors, to gather further feedback on the tool and its design. During these sessions, students were asked to sit down in front of an example LA dash- board (from sign-up to the visualisation screen) and were asked to think aloud whilst using it. If not covered by the participant during the think aloud, questions were asked related to whether the stu- dent understood the relationship between the motivator graphics and their data/scores; the motivators’ meanings; how much they trusted the underlying data and calculated scores; how they would feel if they received a negative report and whether it would en- courage them to improve, and what criteria would they want to see used in a comparison chart. The transcripts of these sessions were analysed by the project team with the majority of students be- ing positive about the concept and could see how they would use it to improve their learning. Common themes identified included: (1) The privacy policy was generally ignored (which students
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The importance of epistemic cognition in student-centred learning

The importance of epistemic cognition in student-centred learning

that increasingly emphasises public accountability, and that is clearly influenced by a behavioural model of learning. So not only has behaviourism been dominant, it continues insidiously to be influential. Secondly, obsessive concern with accountability may well mean that the ideology of behaviourism is accepted as dominant with the language of learning outcomes, objectives and achievements increasingly distorting teaching towards assessment. This can create a gradual marginalisation of those concepts which remain unexpressed and can lead to teaching which is purportedly reformed on constructivist principles but merely comprises practices which are grafted on to the questionable assumptions of a behavioural model of learning, thereby losing much of their potential to facilitate the intentional learning (Bereiter & Scardamalia, 1989) which is so necessary for the knowledge economy in general and higher education in particular. But constructivism suggests that teaching should:
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Student-Centred Learning In Mathematics Constructivism In The Classroom

Student-Centred Learning In Mathematics Constructivism In The Classroom

) emphasised that in student centred environment, knowledge of learners influence future learning; and this can be in Mathematics or other courses where calculation and application of concepts are needed. In addition, strong, committed team work and positive interaction among members and other colleagues are all catalysts to students’ retain of information. Learning in a constructivist environment does not speak of academic performance; the most important action of constructing meaning happens in the mind. Physical actions, hands-on experiences are also necessary for learning, especially for children; nevertheless activities which engage the mind as well as the hands are most beneficial. Examinations and grades are not considered the essential in a constructivist learning. The system in Malaysia is still very much focused on scores and getting A’s, though the education system is changing, the attitudes and teachers’ approaches are still tied down to teacher centred learning though the name SCL is used. SCL promotes and enables students to succeed through various learning styles, visual, auditory, and kinesthetic. Visual and auditory students gain from the presentations in the SCL sessions, they are able to visualize and get a clearer picture of the concept being explained, and as they discuss the problems in groups. Equally, students with kinesthetic learning style can excel through hands on activities that are conducted by the presenting groups through games or short quizzes. SCL is group-based, and when students work in their respective groups, they construct the answers or solutions together, rather than individually. The threat of being criticised on a personal basis or being ridiculed in front of others is removed, and allows the team to be responsible for the answer.
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Student-centred learning through serious games

Student-centred learning through serious games

The students held that they achieved their simulation game’s strategic goals and objectives by: reviewing cases, experimenting at making choices; asking questions, and through ongoing feedback, among other learning activities. There were different reactions from students when they were asked to communicate their opinions and perceptions on how the simulation game has improved their knowledge and understanding of the subject. The students felt a sense of accomplishment and intellectual stimulation as they completed the game’s levels. However, there were students who indicated that they were concerned by the intrinsic cognitive load of their simulation game [48]. They claimed that their instructor broke down the games’ schemas into individual "sub-schemas" and explained each and every one of them in isolation. This enabled them to better understand how to construct schemas. In plain words, the learning material of this game consisted of numerous elements that were related to one another. Most of the students felt that intrinsic cognitive load was high. In contrast, there were a few students who argued that the material was simple for them.
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DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT AND TEACHING OF INNOVATIVE WEB-BASED INTRODUCTORY COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS COURSE

DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT AND TEACHING OF INNOVATIVE WEB-BASED INTRODUCTORY COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS COURSE

Abstract  The state-of-the-art InterLabs Web-lecturing tool has been designed, developed, and tested at the Department of Computer Science and Information Systems and the InterLabs Research Institute, Bradley University, Peoria, Illinois as a part of the National Science Foundation grant # 0196015 (2000-2003) [1,2]. It is based on active utilization of innovative Web-based software engineering, portal, multiagent, streaming multimedia, communication, teaching, learning and information technologies. The introductory “Computer Information Systems” CIS102 course is a required course for all freshman students with major in either Engineering, Business, Science or Education areas. As a result, the innovative Web-based CIS102 course was aimed to 1) provide students of various major areas with highest- possible learning convenience, and 2) meet different requirements for CIS102 course of various Bradley departments. The new CIS102 online course was designed and developed by faculty of the Computer Science and Information Systems department in cooperation with faculty from other Bradley colleges. Student formative and summative evaluations and academic performance clearly demonstrate the advantages of the innovative online teaching and learning technologies based on the InterLabs Web-lecturing tool.
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