Top PDF Assets = Liabilities + Shareholders equity [2.1] Revenues Expenses = Income [2.2]

Bank- Specific And Macroeconomic Determinants Of Profitability In Middle Eastern Banking

Bank- Specific And Macroeconomic Determinants Of Profitability In Middle Eastern Banking

1- The table reports the results from dynamic model using GMM technique of the impact of internal and external variables on bank profitability. The dependent variable is the return on average assets (ROAA). The explanatory variables are defined as follows: ROAA(-1) as a lag of ROAA, LOG(SIZE) as logarithm total assets, LOG^2(SIZE) as square of logarithm total assets, CTI as cost to income ratio, E/SIZE as equity to total assets, L/SIZE as loans to total assets, OFF/SIZE as off balance activities to total assets, LLP/L as loan loss provisions to loans, OVE/SIZE as overheads expenses to total assets, GL as loans growth, MS as market share ratio (which measured by dividing a bank total assets to total assets of all banks in the country); INF as inflation rate, DCP as domestic credit to the private sector, GDPGROWTH as GDP growth, and PG as population growth.
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Bank of America Reports Q4-15 Net Income of $3.3B, EPS of $0.28 Full-Year 2015 Net Income of $15.9B, EPS of $1.31 (1)

Bank of America Reports Q4-15 Net Income of $3.3B, EPS of $0.28 Full-Year 2015 Net Income of $15.9B, EPS of $1.31 (1)

The Corporation also evaluates its business based on the following ratios that utilize tangible equity, a non-GAAP financial measure. Tangible equity represents an adjusted shareholders' equity or common shareholders' equity amount which has been reduced by goodwill and intangible assets (excluding mortgage servicing rights), net of related deferred tax liabilities. Return on average tangible common shareholders' equity measures the Corporation's earnings contribution as a percentage of adjusted average common shareholders' equity. The tangible common equity ratio represents adjusted ending common shareholders' equity divided by total assets less goodwill and intangible assets (excluding mortgage servicing rights), net of related deferred tax liabilities. Return on average tangible shareholders' equity measures the Corporation's earnings contribution as a percentage of adjusted average total shareholders' equity. The tangible equity ratio represents adjusted ending shareholders' equity divided by total assets less goodwill and intangible assets (excluding mortgage servicing rights), net of related deferred tax liabilities. Tangible book value per common share represents adjusted ending common shareholders' equity divided by ending common shares outstanding. These measures are used to evaluate the Corporation's use of equity. In addition, profitability, relationship and investment models all use return on average tangible shareholders' equity as key measures to support our overall growth goals.
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ANNUAL RETURN: FORM 1 - FUND BALANCE SHEET. 5,868,164,666 Debt securities. 16,917,290,068 Land and buildings. 950,898,195 Loans

ANNUAL RETURN: FORM 1 - FUND BALANCE SHEET. 5,868,164,666 Debt securities. 16,917,290,068 Land and buildings. 950,898,195 Loans

NTUC Income Centre-75 Bras Basah Road S(189557) 1 72,052,150 31/12/2014 119,200,000 3,700,000 122,900,000 Amtech Building-159 Sin Ming Road, #06-03& #06-04, S(575625) 2 4,784,297 31/12/2014 6,850,000 -150,000 6,700,000 Eastpoint Shopping Centre-6 Simei St 6 Eastpoint Mall 3 249,865,868 31/12/2014 260,000,000 65,000,000 325,000,000 Blk 730 Ang Mo Kio Ave 6, #01-4272& #02-4272, S(560730) 4 24,063,764 31/12/2014 31,000,000 0 31,000,000 Blk 215 Bedok North Street 1, #02-87 S(460215) 5 10,003,617 31/12/2014 14,500,000 0 14,500,000 Costa Rhu - 9 Rhu Cross #01-02 S(437436), 1 Rhu Cross #01-04 S(437431) 6 1,774,745 31/12/2014 3,060,000 -80,000 2,980,000 NTUC Income Tampines Junction-300 Tampines Ave 5 S(529653) 7 136,601,180 31/12/2014 181,000,000 4,500,000 185,500,000 SLF Building - 510 Thomson Rd, #04-00, #05-00& #06-00 8 17,239,346 31/12/2014 25,200,000 1,500,000 26,700,000 NTUC Income Prinsep House - 30 Prinsep Street S(188647) 9 59,616,424 31/12/2014 80,700,000 2,300,000 83,000,000 NTUC Income Tampines Point - 2 Tampines Central 6, S(529483) 10 69,218,632 31/12/2014 99,600,000 3,400,000 103,000,000 Boustead Industrial Park Ubi - 55 Ubi Ave 1 #02-01, S(408935) 11 39,288,237 31/12/2014 48,600,000 0 48,600,000
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Bank Failure Prediction in Relation to the Business Life Cycle

Bank Failure Prediction in Relation to the Business Life Cycle

DOI: 10.4236/me.2019.103051 762 Modern Economy quacy, asset quality, management expertise, earnings strength, and liquidity). The capital base of a bank is critical because it is the last line of defense against uninsured depositor losses and general creditors. Capital adequacy is a measure of the level and quality of a capital base. Asset quality measures the level of asset risks, which are influenced by the quality and diversity of borrowers and their abilities to repay loans. Management quality measures the quality of the bank of- ficers and the efficiency of the management structure. Earnings ability measures performance and the stability of earning streams. Liquidity measures the ability of a bank to meet urgent, unforeseen deposit outflows. Each of these factors in- fluences bank failure. Asset loss is a direct cause of bank failure; however, other factors indicate the ability of the bank to remain operational despite these losses (Huang et al . [1]). A comprehensive review of bank failure prediction models re- vealed that the financial ratios constructed to measure the CAMEL components (Cole and Gunther [25]; Sarkar and Sriram [26]; Tam and Kiang [27]; Whalen [28]) predict bank failures based on financial ratios. We proposed financial ratios based on publicly available balance and income data (in the call reports) that commercial banks must report to regulatory authorities. Several characteristics of these data reflect the soundness of a commercial bank. Zhao et al . [29] suggested that financial ratios are effective variables for predicting and explaining bank fail- ures. Several previous studies have investigated various financial ratios: 1) cash flow to loans (Ravi and Pramodh [30]; Chauhan et al . [31]); 2) interest expense to average assets (Canbas et al . [34]; Ravi and Pramodh [30]; Chauhan et al . [31]); 3) net income to equity (Olmeda and Fernandez [33]; Ravi and Pramodh [30]; Chauhan et al . [31]); 4) retained earnings to assets (Cielen et al . [34]; Chauhan et al . [31]), 5) current assets to assets (Olmeda and Fernandez [33]; Ravi and Pramodh [32]); and 6) the quick ratio (Cielen et al . [34]; Canbas et al . [32]).
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An analysis of how Financial Ratios of Companies in Turkey Are Affected by National Standards, and IFRS

An analysis of how Financial Ratios of Companies in Turkey Are Affected by National Standards, and IFRS

Adoption in 2005 of IAS/IFRS by Turkish listed companies resulted in changes in classification, valuation and disclosure of financial items. This paper makes accessible to non-Turkish speakers a detailed investigation of the results from previous ratio analysis studies identified by Balsari & Varan (Balsari & Varan, 2014), in addition to presenting a more extensive analysis than Cengiz (Cengiz, 2014). Eight financial ratios have been analysed before and after implementation of international standards. One set of results compares the periods 2002-2003 with 2005-2006; and the other 2004 with 2005. The companies investigated are substantially the same in both analyses, but different versions of national standards are compared against international standards. Significant differences in average Book Value of Equity per Share are found after implementation of international standards for both sets of comparisons; and for one set only, at a lower confidence level, significant differences are indicated in the leverage ratio. The major contribution of the paper is the analyses of the differences during the pre and post implementation of international standards.
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115 T.C. No. 28 UNITED STATES TAX COURT. COGGIN AUTOMOTIVE CORPORATION, Petitioner v. COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE, Respondent

115 T.C. No. 28 UNITED STATES TAX COURT. COGGIN AUTOMOTIVE CORPORATION, Petitioner v. COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE, Respondent

In order to facilitate Mr. Andrews’ eventual sole ownership of the dealership, as well as to provide Mr. Andrews immediately with some degree of control over the dealership’s assets, Mr. Andrews’ attorney, Charles Egerton recommended that the dealership’s assets be held by a limited partnership. Mr. Egerton advised Mr. Andrews that operating the dealership through a limited partnership would afford Mr. Andrews the following advantages: (1) Limited liability protection; (2) the ability to make disproportionate distributions; (3) a single level of taxation; (4) a lower Federal tax rate; (5) the ability to avoid Florida’s State income tax on his distributive share of profits; and (6) the ability to exercise greater control over the potential sale or liquidation of partnership assets. Mr. Coggin agreed to have the dealership’s assets held by a limited partnership.
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TERMS OF SERVICE AGREEMENT

TERMS OF SERVICE AGREEMENT

contractors, agents, employees, officers, directors, shareholders, affiliates and assigns from all liabilities, claims, damages, costs and expenses, including reasonable attorneys' fees and expenses, of third parties relating to or arising out of (1) this Agreement or the breach of your warranties, representations and obligations under this Agreement; (2) the Website content or your use of the Website content; (3) the Products and services or your use of the Products and services (including Trial Products and services); (4) any intellectual property or other proprietary right of any person or entity; (5) your violation of any provision of this Agreement; or (6) any information or data you supplied to ProPMO ® . When ProPMO ® is threatened with suit
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Financial Evaluation of Depositories (NSDL and CDSL) in India

Financial Evaluation of Depositories (NSDL and CDSL) in India

this situation indicates that NSDL depended on outside financing to finance its current assets as a major part of shareholders’ funds went away in buying fixed assets whereas on the other hand CDSL’s ratio is in all the years was very much less than the standard ratio which indicates that the shareholders’ funds are sufficient to finance both fixed assets and current assets requirements of NSDL and CDSL. Comparing CV of both the depositories it is understood that NSDL has high variations in the ratio as compared to, CDSL which indicates that CDSL is more financially strong and stable in relation to NSDL.
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November 30, 2014 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORT

November 30, 2014 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORT

The Summary Schedule of Investments does not reflect the complete portfolio holdings. It includes the Fund’s 50 largest holdings and each investment of any issuer that exceeds 1% of the Fund’s net assets. “Other Securities” represent all issues not required to be disclosed under the rules adopted by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). In certain instances, securities for which footnotes listed above may otherwise apply are included in the Other Securities caption. The complete schedule of portfolio holdings is available (i) without charge, upon request, by calling (800) 342-5734; and (ii) on the SEC’s website at http://www.sec.gov.
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The University of Michigan Reports on Federal Awards in Accordance with OMB Circular A-133 For the Year Ended June 30, 2005

The University of Michigan Reports on Federal Awards in Accordance with OMB Circular A-133 For the Year Ended June 30, 2005

While the University acknowledges the seriousness of the State's budget situation and has taken meaningful steps to reduce expenses throughout the University's operations, higher education is critical to the success of the State’s economic future and, over the long term, a more sustainable model of state support must be considered. The accumulated effects of reduced state appropriations are considerable and over time it becomes difficult to sustain the resultant cost reductions while maintaining the high caliber of our academic programs. To preserve the quality of a Michigan education, the University’s budget for 2006 includes a 12.3 percent tuition increase for resident undergraduates and a 6 percent increase for nonresident undergraduates on the Ann Arbor campus, along with an 11.9 percent tuition increase for the Dearborn and Flint campuses. The decision to recommend significant tuition increases was not an easy one, particularly in light of concerns that the University remain affordable; however, the University has also increased centrally budgeted financial aid by 28 percent.
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Effect of corporate governance on financial performance of Nepalese commercial banks

Effect of corporate governance on financial performance of Nepalese commercial banks

Corporate governance is the way power is exercised over corporate entities (Tricker, 2015). Cochran & Wartick (1988) defined corporate governance as "...an umbrella term that includes specific issues arising from interactions among senior management, shareholders, boards of directors and other corporate stakeholders”. According to Lu & Batten (2001), corporate governance refers to the private and public institutions, including laws, regulations and accepted business practices, which together govern the relationship, in a market economy, between corporate managers and entrepreneurs (corporate insiders) on one hand, and those who invest resources in corporations, on the other". In recent years, the focus on corporate governance has increased due to the increased number of bankruptcies caused by fraud or errors in financial accounting. The reason behind those cases was the absence of corporate governance regulations in the organizations leading to the implementation of different accounting practices, increment in personal interest and biased reporting (Ioana & Mariana , 2014). Financial performance helps to measure how well organization is able to use its assets to generate the revenue. It helps to measure the firm’s financial health over a given period of time. Financial performance is used by different analyst to compare the company’s performance with other firms under same industry by analyzing the annual report like balance sheet, income statement, cashflow statement.
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2. The Responsibilities and Liabilities of the Landlord/Letting Agent

2. The Responsibilities and Liabilities of the Landlord/Letting Agent

In this case the premises include the whole of the letting - i.e. including gardens, patios, walls, etc - and can be applied to the communal areas of estates or multi-occupancy buildings, including lifts, rubbish chutes, stairs and corridors. Section 4 provides tenants or other affected persons with the right to seek compensation for personal injury or damage to property. Section 2 of the Occupiers’ Liability Act 1957 provides that the occupier of a property has a duty of care to all visitors who come onto their premises. This applies to landlords where they are the legal occupier of some parts of their rented stock, e.g. shared-use areas such as lifts, staircases and entrance lobbies – in some cases even grounds and car parks.
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The Exogenous Shock Hypothesis and Bankruptcy

The Exogenous Shock Hypothesis and Bankruptcy

expenses is positive or negative. The key finding from these rows in both Panel A and B is that our main result (i.e., a strongly significant positive coefficient for the time period immediately after the exogenous payment) holds only when we limit the sample to negative net income individuals, with income <= expenses (second row of each panel). On the other hand, all coefficients across all time periods are insignificant for individuals with positive net income (third row of each panel). These results imply that the exogenous payment will be particularly effective in persuading individuals who have both negative net income (which suggests they can use the exogenous cash payment to pay current expenses to avoid bankruptcy) and low financial benefits of the bankruptcy not to file (i.e., they have low balance sheet incentives to file).
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RETIREMENT INCOME PLANNING

RETIREMENT INCOME PLANNING

Retirees can categorize expenses into one of two buckets: essential or discretionary. Walk through the final numbers with your client to make sure he or she understands the differences between each bucket, as well as where cuts can potentially be made to get to his or her desired lifestyle. Once all estimates are documented, review the final total. This is a point where it’s appropriate to discuss how an account balance of $300,000, $400,000 or even $500,000 may not equate to the annual income your client needs in retirement to cover all expenses. Reinforce that building an income plan is the next step in figuring out how to turn that account balance into a paycheck that can last throughout retirement.
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FINANCIAL HEALTH OF SELECTED IRON AND STEEL COMPANIES IN INDIA - Z SCORE MODEL

FINANCIAL HEALTH OF SELECTED IRON AND STEEL COMPANIES IN INDIA - Z SCORE MODEL

Hamsalaksmi and manickam (2005) analyzed the financial performance of the thirty four Indian software companies. The structure of liquidity position, leverage position and profitability position of the selected companies were analysed in the study. It was found that the liquidity position and working capital were favorable during the period of study. The debt equity position revealed that the companies really more upon the internal financing than debt financing. Based on turnover ratios it was suggested that the efficiency in management of fixed assets and total assets must be increased. Return on investment and return on equity proved that the overall profitability position of selected software companies has been increasing gradually.
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Do we need big banks? Evidence on performance, strategy and market discipline

Do we need big banks? Evidence on performance, strategy and market discipline

We consider a bank’s business model, as proxied by five variables. First, fee income is the share of noninterest income, comprising fees, commissions and trading income, in total operating income. Fee income measures the overall importance of a bank’s noninterest income generating activities, relative to more traditional interest generating activities. On average, banks are seen to obtain 30.5% of their income in the form of noninterest fees. As related variables, we also consider a bank’s net interest income relative to assets and its noninterest income relative to assets. The interest income and other operating income variables have sample means of 0.031 and 0.024, respectively. Further, as an indicator of customer focus we define loans as the ratio of loans to total earning assets, reflecting to what extent as bank originates loans rather than holds other assets such as securities. The mean loans variable is 0.678. As an indicator of customer focus on the liability side, we in addition construct the non-deposit short-term funding variable as the share of non- deposit funding in total customer and short-term funding. A higher non-deposit short-term funding share means that a bank relies relatively more on non-deposit, wholesale funding, and that it deals relatively little with traditional bank depositors. The mean non-deposit funding share is 0.083.
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Chapter 11: Completing Quarterly Activities and Closing the Fiscal Year

Chapter 11: Completing Quarterly Activities and Closing the Fiscal Year

At the end of the fiscal year, the temporary owner’s equity accounts (revenues, expenses, and drawing) are closed to a permanent owner’s equity account. In Peachtree, there are two permanent owner’s equity accounts: the owner’s capital account and the Retained Earnings account. Peachtree closes the temporary accounts to the Retained Earnings account.

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To Steal or Not to Steal: Firm Attributes, Legal Environment, and Valuation

To Steal or Not to Steal: Firm Attributes, Legal Environment, and Valuation

One governance category that consistently shows no relation to firm at- tributes or to firm valuation is social awareness. It seems as if firms do not become more socially responsible when they have better growth opportunities, need more external financing, or have higher ownership concentration, per- haps because they believe social responsibility is not important to investors. Indeed, we find no evidence that investors value what CLSA defines as social awareness—child labor practices, political legitimacy, environmental responsi- bility, equal employment policy, and ethical behavior. These social responsibility criteria are contentious. For example, economists debate whether child labor in low-income economies is damaging to those societies, since the alternatives could be starvation, prostitution, or drug peddling.
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