Top PDF Business English for Success

Business English for Success

Business English for Success

across disappoint integration particular separate address disapprove intelligent perform similar answer doesn’t interest perhaps since argument eighth interfere personnel speech athlete embarrass jewelry possess strength beginning environment judgment possible success behavior exaggerate knowledge prefer surprise calendar familiar maintain prejudice taught career finally mathematics privilege temperature conscience government meant probably thorough crowded grammar necessary psychology thought definite height nervous pursue tired describe illegal occasion reference until desperate immediately opinion rhythm weight different important optimist ridiculous written
Show more

602 Read more

Research on the Application of Flipped Classroom in the Teaching Reform of Business English Writing

Research on the Application of Flipped Classroom in the Teaching Reform of Business English Writing

teachers will write review students like the side give proper guidance, solve the classroom writing difficulties of students, students are more confident more interested, this not only solved the lag after marking the traditional teaching, and the interaction between teachers and students well. The students' confidence in writing. (3) share. After the students completed the composition under the guidance of the teacher, to encourage students to read their own works, and students to exchange their own writing experience, share the joy of success, teachers should give timely affirmation and praise, and make the necessary corrections. Third, after the layout of consolidation the development of practice, timely feedback. By turning the classroom to stimulate students interest and practice exercises, students' understanding of English writing than before has been improved, then the classroom activities once again extended to the class, help students autonomy, consciously learning habits. [5] Exercise after class is to expand the class the contents of the consolidation and overstating, students are required to do the summary and reflection of the content of the class, but also to find their own problems, feedback to the teacher, to solve the problem, complete the flipped classroom A series of applications in the teaching reform of English Writing.
Show more

6 Read more

Business English as a Lingua Franca – A Cross-Cultural Perspective of Teaching English for Business Purposes

Business English as a Lingua Franca – A Cross-Cultural Perspective of Teaching English for Business Purposes

understanding a message. In high-context cultures (e.g. Japan, Arab countries, Greece, Spain), speakers rely on implicit communication and an indirect style of writing and speaking. On the other hand, in low-context cultures (e.g. Anglo-Saxon countries, German-speaking countries and Scandinavian countries) the emphasis is on explicit communication and a direct style in writing and speaking. According to the principle of linguistic relativity (often referred to as the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis), the structure of language affects human thought processes and the way in which humans conceptualise reality. This view is also shared by Richard D. Lewis (2006), who focuses on cultures and their communication patterns primarily in business contexts. In his book on conducting business across cultures, When Cultures Collide: Leading Across Cultures, Lewis writes: “Whatever the culture, there’s a tongue in our head” (Lewis 2006, 63). Lewis sees thought as internalised language and claims that nationals of different countries use their language and speech in different ways since different languages express different patterns of our thinking and of our behaviour. One of his key claims is that patterns of communication vary across the globe and that non-native speakers tend to apply the patterns of their native language when communicating in English (Lewis 2006, 11). The fact that different cultures have their specific ways of speaking and listening is important for raising the awareness of potential misunderstandings in communication. In order to be successful in business, one must be able to communicate their ideas well and one should be aware of how to communicate proposals and ideas to business partners from different cultures since, in the words of Rogerson-Revell (2010, 443), “[w]hile people may well need to ‘speak the same language’ in […] multilingual contexts, they may not necessarily ‘speak the same way’, for instance, because of underlying differences
Show more

11 Read more

Perspectives on Business English as a Lingua Franca in Business Communication

Perspectives on Business English as a Lingua Franca in Business Communication

Jordan (1989) categorised English for Business Purposes into two: English for General Business purposes (EGBP) and English for Specific Business purposes (ESBP). However, there are various sub-divisions that exist according to different spotlights such as the time the course takes place (i.e. pre-experience, simultaneous/in-service and post-experience) [60] and/or different professional areas dealt with (e.g. English for Medical Purposes, English for Vocational Purposes) [55]. EGBP is mainly targeted with new learners on their early periods of their career and deals with a broad range of people focusing on various business settings such as meeting people, and travelling by utilizing genre-oriented lexis and grammar in addition to all four main language skills (listening, reading, speaking, and writing) [55].
Show more

7 Read more

itSMF Australia 2009 Conference: summary report of ITSM standards and frameworks survey

itSMF Australia 2009 Conference: summary report of ITSM standards and frameworks survey

There were many different position titles selected and recorded by respondents. To reduce the variety for reporting purposes, all responses naming management of individual processes (e.g. service level, incident, capacity etc.) were summarised as ‘Process Manager’. As shown in Figure 1.1, this was the most frequently reported position (28%), followed by IT Service/Support Manager (8%), CIO/IT Manager (6%) and service desk manager (4%), and operations managers (4%). There were a large number ‘other’ positions, most were recoded into existing categories. The remaining eight ‘other’ positions were General Manager, service design & transition team leader, solutions architect, knowledge manager, business improvement & process management, IT operations analyst, state and govt director, and business analyst.
Show more

16 Read more

SMEs in the UK chemical distribution industry: an ‘operations management’ perspective

SMEs in the UK chemical distribution industry: an ‘operations management’ perspective

(2008) Business development success in SMEs: a case study approach, Journal of Small. Business and Enterprise Development , Vol[r]

36 Read more

An exploration of pre service teachers’ attributions in English

An exploration of pre service teachers’ attributions in English

There were122 pre-service teachers taking part in this study. They were all senior students majoring in English language teaching (ELT) at Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University. Of these students, 75 (61.6%) were female and 47 (38.4%) were male. Typical of the population of ELT in Turkish context, students were ranging in age from 18 to 24, with 8- 10 years of language learning experience. To obtain reliable data, the participants were briefed for the purpose of the attribution questionnaire and assured of confidentiality in that they were not required to write their names on the questionnaires. In an attempt to assess the actual proficiency in English, the subjects were asked to report on their cumulative average of the English courses that they have taken up to the point of completing the questionnaire. The averages were classified as 2.5-4.00=good, and less than 2.5=poor, assuming that the passing average is nearly 2.5 over 4.0.
Show more

7 Read more

Objects, Components and the Virtual Enterprise

Objects, Components and the Virtual Enterprise

From a business standpoint, however, each model suffered from critical weaknesses in the area of information disclosure - for the simple reason that current analysis methods foster a view of software in which all components in a system are equally trusted and controlled. By taking the notion of trust domains and using it as a basis for re-analyzing the models, it was possible to de- rive a compromise model which reflected the differences and evolution in trust relationships between participating organizations. A more general conclusion was the need to capture and re- flect trust relationships adaptively throughout a VE’s information system.
Show more

6 Read more

Measuring the business success of enterprise systems projects

Measuring the business success of enterprise systems projects

A priori categories D to L generated further categories D41 to L100 linked to the ‘shakedown’ and ‘onwards and upwards’ stages of the project lifecycle, the two post- implementation stages 3 and 4. These two stages include all activities both to complete implementation of benefits realisation projects (Peppard and Daniel, 2008) and to assess the business success of the enterprise system. Depending upon the geographic scale of the implementation, these two stages may occupy 3-5 years. In terms of the categories of business case or business driver involved, these dimensions were generally seen by interviewees as determining the timescales needed to evaluate the business success of the ERP implementation. For example, where the business driver was to enable a wider global business strategy, such as global product sourcing, the evaluation of the success of the strategy might require over five years but the success of the enabling ERP system was seen as subsidiary to the success of the wider business strategy, as long as there was no disruption to the business. Criteria for project management success were applied to the ERP implementation in these circumstances; delivery to time, budget and technical parameters. Whereas if the business driver was the enablement of a new, lower cost operating business model, the timescales for evaluation of the business success were much shorter-term, business case metrics related to planned cost savings being compared to actual realised cost savings. For business survival or Y2K compliance the timescales for evaluation of business success were even shorter.
Show more

165 Read more

Determinants of business success of small and medium enterprises

Determinants of business success of small and medium enterprises

Financial resources are of vital importance for a business to run operations profitably. SMEs have comparatively limited resources and greater difficulty in accessing to funding sources, are more dependant on a single product, have less adequate budget control system, lack economies of scale (Thurik,2007). In a recent research study on SME’s in Indonesia founded that SMEs operate on traditional lines in marketing. Strict reaction on account of competition should be responded proactively by SMEs by doing business development and research (Robert, 2007). Information access it stands for the availability of business information is also important to initiate new enterprises and to run the existing enterprise profitably. Information refers to the frequency of contact which an individual makes with different sources of information. Relation building is one of key factors in every society and it has its applications in Pakistan too. The result of this activity is dependent on information accessibility, is vital for the survival and growth of firms (Curran, 2007). Technology is also play an important role in this respect. Technology has a close relationship with improvement of production process.
Show more

8 Read more

Factors critical to the success of business intelligence systems

Factors critical to the success of business intelligence systems

There are two aspects that may explain this situation. Firstly which critical success factors are relevant to a particular situation? As previously discussed much of the literature have generalised critical success factors to a macro level which describes the factor by two or three words. For example this research identified Business Content as a critical success factor. Business Content are standardised predefined Business Intelligence structures which facilitate implementations. A number of industry presentations suggested the use of Business Content as important. However, the quality of Business Content varies between the different functional areas. Jones (2008) suggests that Business Content will address between 50% to 70% of a company’s needs. This will depend on the availability of the Business Content and degree of customisation in the ERP system. However, Business Content is based on SAP ERP system structures and is limited when it comes to other source systems. So the identification of Business Content as a critical success factor is only a starting point for companies. Arguably, the company needs to understand the Business Content structures available for the Component of Business Intelligence they are implementing, and how these structures would support the Application of this Component. This reinforces the role the proposed Critical Success Factor Context Framework (Figure 14) would have in the applicability of the various critical success factors. The framework provides a level of detail for each critical success factor to enable companies to determine its relevance.
Show more

325 Read more

INNOVATION AND BUSINESS SUCCESS IN NIGERIA: FROM INTUITION TO PROCESS MANAGEMENT 

INNOVATION AND BUSINESS SUCCESS IN NIGERIA: FROM INTUITION TO PROCESS MANAGEMENT 

The Latin word ‘innovare’ meaning ‘to make something new’ is what is translated to mean innovation. A number of definitions are put forward to explain what innovation means. For example, Drucker (1985) stated that innovation is the specific tool of businessman/entrepreneurs, the means by which they exploit change as an opportunity for a different business or service. It is capable of being learned and capable of being practiced. Branson (1998) considers innovative business as one which lives breathes ‘outside the box’. According to him, innovation is not just good ideas. It is a combination of good ideas, motivated staff and an instinctive understanding of what customers of the business want and need. Davila et al (2000) assert that innovation is the application of better solutions that meet new requirements, inarticulate needs, or existing market needs. It can also be defined as something original and as consequence, new that ‘breaks into’ the market or into society. While something novel is often described as an innovation, in management and other social science-related disciplines, it is generally considered as a process that brings together various novel ideas in a way that they have an impact on society. This is accomplished through more effective products, processes, services, technologies or ideas that are readily available to markets, governments and society.
Show more

13 Read more

DELTA STATE UNIVERSITY: ANNUAL REPORT SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER For the Previous Year And Budget Request FY 2004

DELTA STATE UNIVERSITY: ANNUAL REPORT SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER For the Previous Year And Budget Request FY 2004

• The Center is making progress in establishing itself as the premier service delivery system for the small business owner, or entrepreneur. The Center is always looking for unique ways to leverage its resources by partnering with other groups or by working more efficiently.

8 Read more

SurveyofInformationTechnology.ppt

SurveyofInformationTechnology.ppt

skills and knowledge you need for professional and personal success.. IT and Business Knowledge[r]

21 Read more

Towards a new framework for SMEs success: a literature review

Towards a new framework for SMEs success: a literature review

Even though regulation is a catalyst in providing stable trading conditions and developing levels of business trust which benefit SME development (Atherton et al., 2008; Oludele and Kinfack, 2012; Welter and Smallbone, 2006), small businesses are disadvantaged against their larger counterparts (Kadiyala and Kumar, 2007; Vickres, 2008; Warfield and Stark- Jones, 2012; Wilson et al., 2012). In more detail, SMEs are less resilient to regulatory shocks, miscalculations and uncertainties; they lack regulation specialists; their need to grow can be badly affected by regulation; they face large costs of administration as well as regulatory burdens and they often need the assistance of government to comply with regulations (Atherton et al., 2008; Edwards et al., 2003; Harris, 2000; Oludele and Kinfack, 2012; Welter and Smallbone, 2006). Above all, though, is the fact that the costs of regulation for small businesses far outweigh that for large businesses with the majority accounting for environmental compliance (Ebbage, 2009; SBS, 2007; Wilson et al., 2011; Williamson et al., 2006a) and with many SMES struggling to keep up with the costs and reporting lower profits (Baldwin, 2004; Kadiyala and Kumar, 2007; Warfield and Stark-Jones, 2012; Wilson et al., 2012). Consequently, many experts believe that the nature of the regulatory burden affects SMEs competitiveness and productivity, restricts business start-up, impedes successful performance and growth and contributes to business failure (Chittenden et al., 2002; Edwards et al., 2003; Guo and Shi 2012; Harris, 2002; SBRC, 2005; Stuart, 2000; White and Parasher, 2007; Wilson et al., 2012).
Show more

44 Read more

Re place ing space in Libyan women’s language learning and culture mapping

Re place ing space in Libyan women’s language learning and culture mapping

Abstract. Libya embarks on a new era in world relations where learning English has become a necessity. This study investigated how Libyan women managed to study abroad, found their place and learned a language despite the country’s cultural subjection against women. It explored what motivated them to study English, how they felt about the learning environment, and the process of engaging themselves in intercultural exchange. Twelve female Libyan were subjects of this study. This study utilized a combination of the descriptive and analytical research designs. Since this is a qualitative study, the researcher used thematic analysis in analyzing and interpreting gathered data. It is founded in Milton Rokeach’s Theory which says that each person has a highly organized system of beliefs, attitudes, and values, which guides behavior. Personal motivation and the desire to live through another culture without compromising its own concluded this study. The cultural construct that Libyan women can’t decide and can’t do a lot is unacceptable to these women who believe that they could play a very significant presence in the new government.
Show more

7 Read more

Using Business Plans For Teaching Entrepreneurship

Using Business Plans For Teaching Entrepreneurship

Business plan preparation is also important for entrepreneurship education. Research shows that entrepreneurship education is enhanced through the use of application-based methodology as opposed to theory- based approaches (Harrison & Leitch, 2005). This is due to the experiential nature of entrepreneurship. Many scholars believe the best way to teach the entrepreneurial context is through providing students with learning experiences (White, Hertz, & D'Souza, 2011). Teaching entrepreneurship is seen as similar to teaching a craft such as medicine or architecture, where the student must acquire procedural as well as declarative knowledge (Anderson, 1983). Declarative knowledge is information of which students are consciously aware, that can be acquired from textbooks, and that students can clearly report, such as on examinations. Procedural knowledge is expertise and know-how acquired through practice, and is more difficult for students to articulate (Ambrosini & Bowman, 2001). Procedural knowledge is best acquired through experiential learning such as internships, residencies, etc. In the case of teaching entrepreneurship it is often difficult to provide these types of opportunities, so alternative methods must be devised. Involving students in a analyzing a problem situation that requires identification and analysis of alternative solutions, such as preparing a business plan, is a valuable method for experiential learning because it requires the integration of previously acquired procedural knowledge (finance, marketing, strategy, etc.). This technique can provide students with the opportunity to connect theory from other subject matter with its practical application.
Show more

16 Read more

Business success of incubated startups

Business success of incubated startups

Two startups, for personal reasons, failed to get involved in the incubation program and left Wayra. Linxy could not continue for personal and time reasons. Currently, the app can be downloaded on iOS. Makes it easier to get information when reading books and magazines. Just if a user points their iPhone to text and gets instant explanation and word definition. The user's language is English. Excalibur won the Deutsche Telekom competition and a support of € 500,000. Therefore, he decided to use Germany's offer. He succeeded in the competition of 443 registered ideas (eTrend, 2017) At a time when the whole world is paralyzed by the tumultuous confidence of a large number of passwords, pisces attacks on credit cards and hacked mailboxes, Excalibur has come up with unique encryption and password-enhancing technology, with advanced CRcOTP technology that has also taken businesses like AVG, Intel or Deutsche Telekom. This technology is trying to build on an existing Google pioneer with its Authenticator service and to move it further by creating a universal Cloud Authentication service. To use Excalibur, a mobile phone is also sufficient to serve as a hardware token. All you have to do is install Excalibur on your phone. Subsequently, the user combines each device (computer, gateway) with a web page where it scans the QR code through Excalibur. Whenever a mobile phone approaches your computer or gateway, the system automatically logs in. If they have resigned, they are automatically logged off. (Šandi, 2017)
Show more

7 Read more

Business Education:
Grooming for Success

Business Education: Grooming for Success

□ Its vehicles for community outreach in­ clude its Small Business Development Center, financed jointly by the university and the U.S. Small Business Administra­ tion, and its In s titu te for Labor- Management Relations, funded initially by a grant from the National Alliance of Postal and Federal Employees. Its efforts to en­ courage promising minority youngsters to pursue business careers include its sum­ mer actuarial program for high school stu­ dents, funded by the Society of Actuaries and several insurance companies, and a summer business institute for high school students it co-sponsors with the Univer­ sity of Maryland as part of the corporate- supported Leadership Education and De­ velopment (LEAD) program.
Show more

9 Read more

Masculine Discrepancy Stress and Health Behavior Outcomes

Masculine Discrepancy Stress and Health Behavior Outcomes

Institute, 1988, 1990; Narver & Slater, 1990; Shapiro 1988; Webster 1988). Modern marketing discipline, of which the marketing concept is the foundation, states that organizations must identify and satisfy customers’ requirements more effectively than the competition to reach success (Day 1994, Kotler 2002). The results related to market orientation acceptance are well recognized in the literature (Dawes 2000; Jaworski & Kohli 1993; Kumar 2002; Narver & Slater 1990). Market orientation’s financial impact and positive effect on performance fall within researchers’ and practitioners’ interest (Dawes 2000; Han, Kim, & Srivastava, 1998; Kirca et al., 2005; Kumar 2002; Noble et al., 2002; Rodriguez Cano, Carrillat, & Jaramillo, 2004). Market orientation increases profits (Kirca et al., 2005) and positively affects customers’ satisfaction with products and services, customer retention, and customer loyalty (Doyle 1995; Jaworski and Kohli, 1993, 1996). Market orientation positively affects customer satisfaction and loyalty because market-oriented firms anticipate customer needs and offer products and services fulfilling those requirements (Slater & Narver, 1994). Market orientation promotes
Show more

158 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...