Top PDF Campobello Island: far from the mainstream

Campobello Island: far from the mainstream

Campobello Island: far from the mainstream

special photograph Canadian a to their island and Lubec, Maine, of proximity if with and the Thesis: of a examine Campobello, of residents Background and States.. locale, its of relation[r]

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Articulations of Islamophobia: From the Extreme to the Mainstream?

Articulations of Islamophobia: From the Extreme to the Mainstream?

illiberal Islamophobia: Highlighting and marginalising the extreme and unacceptable face of hate This section provides an analysis of what we call illiberal Islamophobia. It is ‘illiberal’ inasmuch as it is not only not accepted by the liberal norm, but denounced as unacceptable and alien to our post-racial societies (Lentin and Titley 2011), thus allowing the legitimization of other, less obvious and less racialized forms. Our distinction between the liberal and illiberal articulation here is not so much based on political and ideology theory, but rather on the perceived quality of each concept in the mainstream discourse. Liberal thus refers to the prevalent obedience to the constitution and the rule of law particularly regarding equal treatment of citizens, and a loyalty to the deliberation processes central to liberal democracy particularly in the form of elections. Illiberal in our case refers to the treatment of certain groups, particularly based on ethnic and/or cultural generalized traits, and the possibility (discursive or otherwise) to circumvent the rule of law, the constitution and even electoral results should a threat be considered serious enough. While ‘extreme’ and ‘mainstream’ Islamophobias could be considered more appropriate, we argue that what we term ‘liberal Islamophobia’ occurs both on the extreme and in the mainstream. In addition to this, as our examples illustrate, liberalism is a concept around which actors articulate their opposition to Islam and Muslims, whereas ‘extreme’ and ‘mainstream’ are not. Not only has Islamophobia experienced a mainstreaming (through the liberal articulation), but so too have what were once deemed ‘extreme’ or far-right ideologies, groups and movements, often by appealing to liberal Islamophobia as will be examined. The most notable examples being the Front National in France, the white nationalist ‘Alt-Right’ that has emerged in the United States (SPLC 2016), and United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP).
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Homelessness and access to the informational mainstream

Homelessness and access to the informational mainstream

Since the higher-level needs of homeless people have received very little direct attention in existing academic literature, this study was necessarily exploratory in nature. Although this may seem to limit the research in some ways, it coheres with a guiding precept of our research that potential judgements and preconceptions of a marginalised group be minimised. As Hodgetts et al. have written concerning media portrayals of the homeless: “Homeless people are often displaced from their own stories, being talked about rather than talked to.” (Hodgetts et al., 2008, p. 937). The abundance of assumptions that are made about homelessness and homeless people accentuated our feeling that participants own accounts should inform the research findings as far as possible. This is consistent with both Grounded Theory and Sensemaking approaches to research (Denscombe, 2003, p. 114; Dervin, 1992). There are of course limits to the degree to which this is possible: research often involves contrived situations which are not part of the participant’s regular behaviour; arguably, meaning is generated by both parties in any exchange (Järvinen, 2003, p. 217); and the analysis of data by the researcher necessarily impacts upon its presentation and subsequent meaning (Denscombe, 2003, pp. 268-269). However, despite these limitations, we felt it important to explore participants’ own narratives as the basis for investigating the research questions.
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Open and Distance Learning in Library and Information Sc.: From Marginalization to Mainstream

Open and Distance Learning in Library and Information Sc.: From Marginalization to Mainstream

The strength of the Diploma Programme in Library and Information Sc.in the first five years was: 1988-89(2729), 1989-90(3738), 1991-92(1572), 1992-93(3109), and 1993-94(1855). Though the number of students intake was very high in early years but thereafter started declining and reaching the lowest in 2000-2001, due to less job opportunities, demand for higher degrees by the employers, availability of distance learning courses in neighboring states, etc. This was a crucial time so far LIS Education in the University, but, thereafter, the University started BLIS Programme in 2002, MLIS Programme in 2007 and M. Phil in 2008. Launch of new programme gave confidence to the applicants and the strength again started moving upward. The University also offers Ph.D. Programme in Library and Information Sc., As such the University offers education from Diploma Programme at the lowest and PhD. Programme at the highest level. Such varied offerings are not available at any other University in the State.
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Screening for social determinants of health in clinical care: moving from the margins to the mainstream

Screening for social determinants of health in clinical care: moving from the margins to the mainstream

Yet, amassing a body of evidence to demonstrate sufficient benefit in a complex area such as this has resulted in some divergence in national screening recommendations even around single-dimension screening such as screening for intimate partner vio- lence. National recommendations around multi-dimension screening for social risk are not yet available since the evidence base to support such recommendations is highly under-developed at present. More research is still needed in this area to be able to demonstrate whether screening for social risk, and especially for multiple domains of social risk, which require complex and individually tailored interventions, often devel- oped through participatory and community-informed approaches to address local con- textual factors [65] and which lead to multiple relevant outcome measures, will succeed in meeting the Wilson and Jungner screening criteria [66]. There is also an on- going debate regarding the potential unintended consequences of screening which very much depends on how this is done and how well-trained and prepared the clinical staff are and whether referral resources have been sufficiently mapped out. Thus, while adherence to screening in the area of well-defined clinical practice guidelines already demonstrates certain challenges, as one moves towards more complex areas such as screening for social determinants of health, a far more robust evidence base will be needed to generate widespread support and health care culture change in this area.
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Access to mainstream microfinance services for persons with disabilities — lessons learned from Uganda

Access to mainstream microfinance services for persons with disabilities — lessons learned from Uganda

AMFIU is primarily responsible for working on this barrier, with tailored training for credit officers and the sensitization of MFIs’ top managers as the main activities. In principle, AMFIU aims to influence all of its 74 members. However, as a pilot project, six of the top 15 MFIs in Uganda have been specially targeted. In each targeted MFI, efforts are first put into sensitizing top management. The assumption is that little can be done if top management does not actively support the idea, and experiences so far have confirmed that real changes can only be expected in those MFIs where top management actively supports the idea. Besides the branch managers must actively push the idea of inclusion to their credit officers. To keep the issue of being an inclusive MFI on the agenda, top management is recommended to address the issue in management letters, articles in newsletters, staff meetings, etc.
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Mainstream school services for children with primary language impairment - implications from research

Mainstream school services for children with primary language impairment - implications from research

were new to the research studies although they had previous experience of working with children who had language impairment. They undertook group discussion, summarised and fed-back for member checking at later meetings; completed short questionnaires, and made written comments to further critique and develop the language support materials for teachers. The aim was to produce a package for mainstream teachers working with SLTs that could be used with minimal training and maximum flexibility. The package was intended to give principles of learning for the areas of language developed in the NCCHTA study, and to accompany games and activities from the language therapy manual developed for that project.
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Heavy-ion reaction studies of nuclei far from stability

Heavy-ion reaction studies of nuclei far from stability

The recently completed recoil spectrometer TOFI [Wol87] successfully employs the high energy proton beam available from the LAMPP accelerator at Los Alamos to provide a high production r[r]

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Active commuting to school : how far is too far?

Active commuting to school : how far is too far?

The further an adolescent lives from school, the less likely they are to walk or cycle. This extends previous findings in children [18-20] and signifies the importance of locating schools in or near residential communities. With the advancing sprawl around major cities in Ireland, and increasing evidence of the completion of new develop- ments without the provision of schools and local ameni- ties, such evidence is timely and should be considered in policy guidelines for urban planning and development. Among Irish adolescents the criterion distance for walking and cycling to school was ≤ 1.5 miles (2.4 km) and ≤ 2.5 miles (4.0 km) respectively. This indicates that 2.5 miles could be used as a general cut-off within which both walk- ing and cycling to school are achievable. This criterion is greater than previously suggested adult guidelines [40] but lower than the 3.0-mile criterion required for govern- ment-subsidised transport to school for post-primary pupils in Ireland [41] and the U.K [42]. In Denmark, where rates of active commuting are 75%, 14–15 y old secondary school students must live a distance of ≥ 5 miles from school to avail of free transport [42]. The Healthy People 2010 initiative in the US seeks to increase the proportion of trips made by walking to school to 50% and by cycling to 5%, for children and ado- lescents living within one mile of their school [43]. This study provides evidence for the use of distance-related goals for promotion of active commuting, and reveals the need for population specific targets. Irish adolescents are already meeting U.S targets for 2010: approximately three quarters of Irish teenagers who live within one mile walk to school, and 8% within 2 miles cycle. The potential for modal shift in Ireland lies among the adolescents who live between 1.0 and 2.5 miles, and specifically in increasing the proportion who cycle to school. The 39% of car users, and 11% of bus users who live within 2.5 miles of their school are legitimate targets for change to active modes of travel. Among adolescents who reported distance as a bar- rier to active commuting, over 92% lived ≥ 2.5 miles from school and only 7% perceived 2.5 miles as too far to walk or cycle to school, indicating the acceptability of this cri- terion distance. Further research is required into the deter- minants of travel behaviours among adolescents who travel short distances by motorised means, and adoles- cents who perceive short distances as too far.
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Far from Silent: Nineteenth Century Irish Women Writers

Far from Silent: Nineteenth Century Irish Women Writers

Less colourful than Cusack were nuns like Sister Mary Stanislaus MacCarthy, the daughter of Denis Florence MacCarthy and a Dominican; Maria Gibbons, Mother Columba, a Loreto nun from Nav[r]

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Tailoring Thermal Radiation from Near Field to Far Field

Tailoring Thermal Radiation from Near Field to Far Field

If we move our eyes away from the sun, we see the dark universe, which has an extremely low temperature of around 3 K. Essentially, objects on earth with ambient air temperature receive almost zero radiation power from the dark universe compared to the radiation of themselves. However, the radiation channel from objects on earth to the universe is blocked by the thick atmosphere which is spectrally opaque in a wide range, shown as the filled orange area in Figure 1.3. Fortunately, there are open windows where the atmosphere is mostly transparent, particularly the 8 to 13 µ m window, corresponding to the peak of a black body radiation at 300 K (shown as the grey dashed line in Figure 1.3). Thus, nighttime radiative cooling is readily achievable as long as the emissivity in the window is high enough. In fact, nighttime radiative cooling has been known since ancient time. For example, 2000 years ago, people in Iran and India made ice through radiative cooling when the ambient air temperature is above zero degrees Celsius. In modern times, Alan Head patented the use of spectrally selective infrared radiators for nighttime use in 1959 (Head, 1959). Since then, researchers have put great effort to improve the cooling power or to get lower cooling temperature (C. Granqvist, Hjortsberg, and Eriksson, 1982; Eriksson, Lushiku, and C. Granqvist, 1984; Kimball, 1985; D. M. Diatezua et al., 1996).
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Speaking back to the mainstream from the margins: lessons from one boutique senior secondary school

Speaking back to the mainstream from the margins: lessons from one boutique senior secondary school

This chapter considers how the daily practices and underpinning philosophies from one particular school site might inform the broader project of reframing mainstream schooling in more socially just ways. Like our colleagues, Mills, McGregor, Hayes and te Riele (see Chapter XX??), we feel that there are particular lessons that might be taken from schools that work in the margins by catering to young people who have disconnected from schooling. We feel that there are three key lessons that can be taken from this chapter for mainstream schooling: (re)engaging students who have disconnected from schooling; fostering a commitment to belonging to a community of learners that is based on an ethic of care, trust and respect; and (re)imagining education in more socially-just, equitable and counter- hegemonic ways.
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What can we learn from mainstream education textbook research?

What can we learn from mainstream education textbook research?

having them attempt more difficult, open-ended problems which were different in appearance from the exercises and problems which featured throughout the unit, obliging learners to apply their knowledge creatively. However, many teachers felt uncomfortable with this approach and modified the materials in various ways as a result in the classroom: some adapted the end-of-unit tests so they resembled the mathematical problems students had worked on through the unit; others omitted the open-ended test items altogether, substituting their own items. The textbook writers were unsuccessful in their attempts to persuade all teachers of the wisdom of their approach during focus groups, and so ‘teachers who continued to be uncomfortable with such items…simply deleted or changed them’ (pp.179 -180). A final example
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From migrants to mainstream : a series of articles on the  Triangle's evolving Latino population

From migrants to mainstream : a series of articles on the Triangle's evolving Latino population

temporary workers, these migrants are increasingly here to stay – a visible and integral part of both rural and urban communities. North Carolina, and the Triangle region in particular, have seen some of the most dramatic changes. As the Latino population continues to grow and interact with local communities – in schools, businesses and other settings – the very definition of what it means to be a Tar Heel has begun to shift. Furuseth and Smith (2006) offer a sweeping summation of the impact: “[T]he story of Latinos in the South has been rewritten, and a recurring theme in the region’s cities and rural communities is one of settlement, permanence and the transformation of place” (emphasis mine) (p. 1). Among North Carolina’s Latino migrants, a broad transition from temporary sojourners to settlers is in full swing. These changes will continue to reconfigure life and culture in the state for years to come.
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Mordellidae (Coleoptera) from Socotra Island

Mordellidae (Coleoptera) from Socotra Island

Body length from tips of mandibles to tips of elytra 3.8 mm, to tip of pygidium 4.7 mm. Head strongly convex, only slightly wider than long (width to length ratio 7.3 : 7.0) and distinctly narrower than pronotum (ratio of head width to pronotal width 7.0 : 9.0), distinctly prolonged at mouth part. Eyes (Fig. 23) very large, almost circular, occupying almost half of head width (frontal view), only moderately narrowed towards mandibles, very coarsely facetted, with short and sparse setae. Posterior margin behind eyes with very narrow tempo- ral border, temporal angles very small, but distinct. Maxillary palpus (Fig. 24) rather small, palpomere II only moderately wider than palpomere III, terminal palpomere rather shortly securiform, 1.5 times longer than wide, its inner angle situated at midlength. Antennae (Fig. 25) rather long, reaching shoulders, antennomeres I and II almost subequal, antennomere II as long as antennomere IV, antennomere III one fi fth shorter and one fourth narrower than anten- nomere II, antennomere IV indistinctly narrower and one fourth shorter than antennomere V, antennomere V 1.4 times as long as wide, antennomeres V–X gradually slightly diminished, terminal antennomere oblong oval with narrower distal end, twice as long as wide and one third longer than preceding one.
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the How Mainstream Investors can

the How Mainstream Investors can

Two themes commonly emerge among mainstream investors regarding the cultural changes that need to occur for impact investing to take hold. The first theme is that organizational values need to shift and be more focused on impact. The second theme is that individual perceptions about impact investing need to change. Some mainstream investors might recognize that within their organizations, inaccurate beliefs are held about the term “impact investing” – that it implies philanthropic activities and below-market returns. Clearly, as this report and others have discussed, there is a subset of impact investing that fits that description but we can also find numerous impact investments which are compelling on financial merits alone. Overcoming this bias will require new information to be presented. Such information may come in the form of the aforementioned industry reports or, more likely to change minds, in the form of the organization’s findings after evaluating or piloting impact investing approaches.
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Feminist Challenge to the Mainstream IR

Feminist Challenge to the Mainstream IR

According to Feminists, a more global vision of security is needed rather than a state- centric one. They advocate that the behaviour of the individuals and the domestic politics of states cannot be separated from the states’ behaviour in the international system. Furthermore, Feminists assert that a very limited number of women have participated in security decision-making and implementation. As a result, the security decisions of states reflect masculine orientations. Instead of this a people-centred security is needed. This notion of security goes beyond state and national boundaries (Hoffman 2001, 102). Feminist writers such as Roberts argued that due to gender-blindness Realists rendered domestic violence against women invisible and as a result they made false assumptions about the ‘peacefulness’ within societies, which is often contrasted with the violence between nations. This gender blindness also fails to realize the fact that it is usually men who exercise power over other man and over other woman (Roberts 1983).
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AT THE CROSSROADS BETWEEN NICHE AND MAINSTREAM

AT THE CROSSROADS BETWEEN NICHE AND MAINSTREAM

A merger of the serviced apartment platforms run by US-based Oaktree Capital Management and The Serviced Apartment Company (SACO) created a new £60 million hospitality company. The new company, which will operate under the SACO name, will include both Oaktree and SACO’s existing serviced apartments, as well as the new Beyonder ApartHotel brand. The business will have a portfolio of 1,645 apartments, comprised of SACO’s existing portfolio of 700 operated apartments across the UK, plus new transactions on 945 apartments across ten properties in London, Amsterdam, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Aberdeen and Dublin, due to open in stages from December 2015. The Adina Frankfurt was recently purchased by Deka Investment GmbH in a forward funding deal from developer GBI AG for a sum of €39 million. The 181- unit property will be in the city’s Europaviertel district and is set to open in autumn 2016.
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Bruchinae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) from Socotra Island

Bruchinae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) from Socotra Island

Comments. These two specimens from Zemhon area show some similarity with C. sudanensis Southgate, 1971, but are of a darker and more reddish colour; pronotum is clearly less trans- verse, with lateral margin straight in basal three quarters. They obviously belong to a new species, but description has been postponed until a male specimen becomes available. Body colour is reddish brown, including antennae; anterior and median legs testaceous. Vestiture uniformly pale yellowish. Head with strong and shining median keel. Posterior femora with pecten made of one slightly stronger spine followed by 7–9 smaller spines. Body length 3.5–4.7 mm.
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Mainstream magazines : home and mobility

Mainstream magazines : home and mobility

What makes mainstream magazines important? The ways in which they addressed their intended audience tell us about an emerging demographic that still defines the norm in Canada: White, middle-class, and aspirational. Their contents tell us about gender divisions that continue to determine contemporary social structures, and their advertisements tell us about the development of consumer culture. The fiction they circulated tells us about shared ideals and value systems, while the disappearance of many of these authors from literary history hints at cultural hierarchies that came into play as the magazines went into decline. The middlebrow magazines sold themselves on the basis of the expert knowledge of their contributors in areas such as dress, interiors, health and beauty, cookery, domestic economy, travel, reading, and shopping. The guidance of magazine editors, authors, and advertisers was welcomed by readers and consumers faced with an increasingly wide array of choices, and the magazines offered fantasies of mobility—both geographical and economic—that speak to the material and social aspirations of the era.
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