Top PDF Changing Publication Cultures in the Humanities

Changing Publication Cultures in the Humanities

Changing Publication Cultures in the Humanities

Whilst capture of such information is increas- ingly possible, the publication, structuring and remixing of this content require further attention. As research conversations and formal publication of results merge, and increasingly occur in a wholly digital environment, it is imperative that where pos- sible these processes and interconnections should be captured and represented in a way that is semanti- cally rich and can off er an experiential as well as data-rich encounter with the original research pro- cess ‘recorded’. In terms of organisational practice, this extends beyond publication, into the underlying research processes. For example, augmenting offi cial minute taking of a collaborative research seminar (e.g. an ESF event) by digital media allows live- linking, live contextualisation, conversations with scholars not in the room, questions from beyond the fl oor and also beyond the timeframe of individual discussions.
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Diaspora of Islamic Cultures: Continuity and Change

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This paper, drawing upon an ongoing research project funded by Canada’s Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) and the Ford Foundation, in- troduces the main ideas and themes that inform the study of changing gender and family relations among four dis- placed communities of Islamic cultures (Iranian, Afghan, Palestinian, and Pakistani). For members of each group, three sets of “circumstances” are analyzed – an indivi- dual’s experience in the home and host country, together with an examination of socio-economic conditions and po- licies in the host. In addition to these social and economic factors, in particular, it will focus on the ways in which so- cial class, gender, and religious commitments affect an in- dividual’s experience when they move. It is argued that gender significantly impacts new migrants’ experience and how they feel about their “home” country. One of our main hypotheses is that under pressures of a rapid, often difficult, social and cultural transformation, changing gen- der dynamics in the new country can lead to a new under- standing among partners – or, alternatively, to heightened tension, with severely damaging effects, particularly for women and children. Culturally, when family under- standings collapse, this process may be accompanied by an effort to find religious justification for gender inequality. Then, a connection can be seen between difficulties in the new country, the efforts of conservative men to reclaim the dominance they once enjoyed in their countries of origin, and give it a religious justification. Hence, the revival, in the diaspora, of conservative Islamic practice and belief.
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Making Visible Changing Scholarship in the Humanities

Making Visible Changing Scholarship in the Humanities

At the university of Michigan, we are approaching this challenge through the development of Fulcrum. While able to present conventional publication formats in a reader-friendly way, Fulcrum particularly addresses the needs of scholarly authors who wish to link source materials to book-length interpretations of them in an integrated way. From accumulating collections of film and video clips for comparison to visualizing excavation records through three-dimensional interactive models, humanists today often end their research projects with large archives of digital data. Rather than forcing authors to strip away the richness of these materials at the point of formal publication to meet the constraints of a book or journal article format, Fulcrum
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The role of bioenergy in a climate-changing world

The role of bioenergy in a climate-changing world

Priorities for successful synergies between bioenergy and food security include integrated resource management designed to improve both food and water security and access to bioenergy ( [r]

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Serious Bacterial Infections in Febrile Infants Younger Than 90 Days of Age: The Importance of Ampicillin-Resistant Pathogens

Serious Bacterial Infections in Febrile Infants Younger Than 90 Days of Age: The Importance of Ampicillin-Resistant Pathogens

The computerized microbiologic records at PCMC were re- viewed to capture any SBI in study infants. SBI was defined as any culture of blood, urine, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), other normally sterile site, or stool positive for pathogenic bacteria. Urine cultures were considered positive if ⱖ100 000 colony forming units/ml of a single organism were isolated or if 50 000 to 99 000 colony forming units were isolated and the urinalysis was abnormal. For bacteria that could be considered contaminants, such as viridans Streptococci, SBI was diagnosed only if the infant had at least 2 positive cultures.
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Spellings Commission Report on Affordability and Access to Higher Education: changing demographics, economic crisis and investment in human capital

Spellings Commission Report on Affordability and Access to Higher Education: changing demographics, economic crisis and investment in human capital

Mariam Orkodashvili Publication date: 11/23/09 Spellings Commission Report on Affordability and Access to Higher Education: changing demographics, economic crisis and investment in human[r]

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Symbolic Communication and the Notion of “Pachamama” in the “Quechua” and “Aimara” Cultures

Symbolic Communication and the Notion of “Pachamama” in the “Quechua” and “Aimara” Cultures

In different cultures conceptions are built on communication systems and behavior of nature's phenomena, people weave myths that refer to the origins of life, individuals observe the movement of stars, human groups elaborate stories that motivate the states of water in the process of climate change, societies build spiritual conceptions about death and some cultures animate the things of the world, through informal communication and education. In this way, "the Andean culture conceives nature as a living and highly sensitive being capable of responding positively or negatively" (Llanque, 1993). The objectives of this article seek to explore the communication systems and the symbolic representation of the terrestrial and aquatic space of the Andean “Quechua” and “Aymara” man culture of the high plateau of Puno, Peru. The importance lies in understanding the current communication systems and the harmonious planning between man and nature. In the processing of frozen and dried potatoes, "the days destined to raise the Chuño are usually on Mondays, Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays, they are never carried out on Tuesdays and Fridays, because it is believed that these days the Pope, like Chuño , receives the disease "(Condori, 1992, p.17). In this case, the process of the methodology to obtain information was of the existence and visit to the peasant communities.
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Professionalizing school governance: the disciplinary effects of school autonomy and inspection on the changing role of school governors

Professionalizing school governance: the disciplinary effects of school autonomy and inspection on the changing role of school governors

docx Title Professionalizing school governance The disciplinary effects of school autonomy and inspection on the changing role of school governors Author Andrew Wilkins Publication Journal of Educatio[.]

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Entangling the medical humanities

Entangling the medical humanities

There are two things to pay attention to here: one is an imaginary of what the medi- cal humanities must be – integrative, holistic, rounded, ambitious and so on. The other is a metaphorical repertoire – a set of received images, terms and likenesses – that works to license this imaginary, and more precisely, to spatialise the territory between, across and/or through humanistic and clinical thought. Our interest is thus in what precisely is intended by – and what is mobilised through – an insistence that the medical humanities must proceed according to a spatial logic of integration. Because it seems to us that if this integrated, singular medical humanities is preferable to a multi-disciplinary com- mitment to polite (yet determinedly insular) exchange, still it contains its own commit- ment to a particular ‘regime of the inter-’. If the commitment to an integrated medical humanities has indeed, in recent years, been an important and even radical move for the emergence of this fi eld, we want to claim that it none the less mobilises a very particular account (let us say: a decidedly conservative account) of what kinds of things disciplines are; about what forms of spatial arrangement position them against one another; about what relations of exchange are appropriate across them; and about what must thereby constitute the, variously, human, cultural, biological and embodied agencies to which they attend. To be blunt: we are not sure whether any serious ambition to comprehend, and to intervene in, the density, complexity, directionality and capacity of traffi c across this space can be at all moved by a desire for ‘integration’ – including the very space of ‘the inter-’ in which this desire operates.
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Decline of Humanities

Decline of Humanities

Furthermore there is a new and narrowing vocational emphasis in the way students and their parents think about what to study in college. Students are no longer a subject of the nation-state but rather pure economic agents and have highly instrumental and economist’s view (may be efficiency) of the purposes of higher education. And this explains diversion of students from less employable humanities disciplines to the sciences and management courses that assure better employment chances and greater economic benefits. However such a conservative and narrow-minded view of education fails to recognize that the study of humanities
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Ephrem the Syrian’s hymn  On the Crucifixion  4

Ephrem the Syrian’s hymn On the Crucifixion 4

http //www hts org za doi 10 4102/hts v71i3 3012 Page 1 of 8 Original Research Author Philippus J (Phil) Botha1 Affiliation 1Department of Ancient Languages and Cultures, Faculty of Humanities, Univer[.]

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Humanities e Books

Humanities e Books

For almost 100 years, the ACLS has promoted the humanities in general and humanities scholars in particular, long before Darnton or anyone else thought they should do. The mission of the ACLS is ‘the advancement of humanistic studies in all fields of learning in the humanities and the social sciences and the maintenance and strengthening of relations among the national societies devoted to such studies’ something it has been doing long before digitization became all the craze.(4) The ACLS is a private and nonprofit federation consisting of 70 national scholarly organizations, and is at the vanguard of promoting American scholarship nationally and internationally in the humanities and related social sciences. HEB is but one small part of the overall work of the ACLS which, in addition to HEB, also funds many scholars in the humanities and related social sciences. For example, in 2009 alone, ACLS awarded more than $10 million to over 300 scholars. The ACLS also promotes and facilitates peer review in the humanities and related social sciences. The ACLS’s current president is Pauline Yu (since 2003). She succeeds a number of equally notable scholars, such as Stanley N. Katz, Frederick Burkhardt and R. M. Lumiansky. The ACLS is funded by public and private foundation grants, endowment income, dues, government contracts and individual gifts. Since 1997 the ACLS Fellowship Campaign has sought more and larger gifts to fund scholars’ stipends. The ACLS relies on annual subscriptions from individuals and libraries to its publications and programs, and herein lies its strong connection with HEB.
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Kinetics of Nucleic Acid Synthesis in Human Embryonic Kidney Cultures Infected with Adenovirus 2 or 12: Inhibition of Cellular Deoxyribonucleic Acid Synthesis

Kinetics of Nucleic Acid Synthesis in Human Embryonic Kidney Cultures Infected with Adenovirus 2 or 12: Inhibition of Cellular Deoxyribonucleic Acid Synthesis

FONG Putnam Memorial Hospital Institute for Medical Research, Bennington, Vermont 05201 Received for publication 9 April 1969 Infection of human embryonic kidney HEK cell cultures with a[r]

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Replicability and replication in the humanities

Replicability and replication in the humanities

In response to this objection, I think it is important to note that there is a wide variety of methods used in the humanities. Among them are: more or less formal logic (in philosophy, theology, and law), literary analysis (in literary studies, philosophy, and theology), historical ana- lysis (in historical studies, philosophy, and theology) and various narrative approaches 36 (in historical studies), constructivism (in art theory, for instance), Socratic questioning (in philosophy), methods involving empathy (in literary studies and art studies), conceptual analysis (in philosophy and theology), the hermeneutical method (in any humanistic discipline that involves careful read- ing of texts, such as law, history, and theology), inter- views (e.g., in anthropology), and phenomenology (in philosophy). This is important to note, because, as I pointed out above, I only want to argue that replication is possible in the humanities to the extent that they are empirical. Replication may not be possible in disciplines that primarily use a deductive method and that do not collect and analyze data, such as logic, mathematics, cer- tain parts of ethics, and metaphysics. This leaves plenty of room for replication in disciplines that are empirical, such as literary studies, linguistics, history, and the study of the arts.
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Putting the humanities to work

Putting the humanities to work

employers who did contribute to the Humanities DDP were highly engaged and expressed strong views on both philosophy and content. Employer representative organisations were able to communicate the findings of past research and consultations. However, there is currently a cultural gap between an education characterised in terms of humanities and social sciences subjects and the concerns that employers express about skills, workforce capability and recruitment. Indeed it was part of the mission of the Humanities DDP to address this cultural gap and to explore how the
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The Humanities in a University of Technology

The Humanities in a University of Technology

purpose of a university of technology is power for its students,. this purpose will be fulfilled only as its academics are allowed[r]

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Mobility and the Humanities

Mobility and the Humanities

authors and texts in preparing the ground for mobility to become an object of study in its own right. Mary Louise Pratt’s Imperial Eyes: Travel Writing and Transculturalism (1992) and Caren Kaplan’s Questions of Travel: Postmodern Discourses of Displacement (1996) stand out in this regard, as do so many of the founding texts of twentieth-century postcolonial studies, including Edward Said’s Orientalism (1994 [1978]), Homi Bhabha’s The Location of Culture (1994), Gayatri Spivak’s In Other Worlds (1987) and Nestor Garcia Canclini’s work on cultural hybridity (Hybrid Cultures: Strategies for Entering and Leaving Modernity, 1989). One reason why work in postcolonial studies hasn’t been linked to the emergence of the ‘new mobilities paradigm’ might be because much of it originated in literary criticism – somewhat divorced from sociological debates on mobility. Another reason would be because it has long been annexed (for teaching purposes, especially) to other important political issues and debates – e.g., Foucauldian analyses of power and oppression and cultural/ethnic
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Antibiotic Resistance Trend of Uropathogens in a Tertiary Teaching Hospital in Rasht, Iran, a Longitudinal Study

Antibiotic Resistance Trend of Uropathogens in a Tertiary Teaching Hospital in Rasht, Iran, a Longitudinal Study

This longitudinal - descriptive study was conducted in teaching hospitals, affiliated with Guilan University of Medical Sciences in Rasht from 2007 to 2014. For this purpose, the data of positive urine cultures and susceptibility testing results of inpatients and outpatients urine specimens from microbiology laboratory of Razi hospital (a tertiary teaching general hospital of Guilan university of medical sciences in Rasht) from 2007 to2014 was gathered. During this 7- year period, 2060 positive urine culture results were obtained.

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Peculiarities of publication activity in humanities and social sciences: analysis and prospects

Peculiarities of publication activity in humanities and social sciences: analysis and prospects

Translation of publications into English does not save the situation because it requires time. But time in this case values more than gold. Thus, a paper is ready, then we spend time to translate it, the translated paper is to be reviewed and then published. After publication it should take up to six months before the paper reaches scientific community and finds like-minded people who are supposed to ensure the citation index to the author. Under the most optimistic projection, the entire process takes no less than one year. Considering the fact of unpopularity and inertness of social sciences and humanities it will take up even more.
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Experimentally Induced Inhibition of Growth in Melanoma Cell Cultures Separated by ~2 Kilometers When Both Share Excess Correlation Magnetic Fields: Macroscopic Evidence of Free Space Quantum Teleportation?

Experimentally Induced Inhibition of Growth in Melanoma Cell Cultures Separated by ~2 Kilometers When Both Share Excess Correlation Magnetic Fields: Macroscopic Evidence of Free Space Quantum Teleportation?

The results were conspicuous and reliable. Figure 3 shows the means and standard deviations (SDs) for the cells remaining 24 hr after the serial (every min) injections of 50 μL of 800 μM hydrogen peroxide (local) into the dish and in the dish that did not receive any injections when both shared the same decreasing and increasing frequency (phase)-modulated magnetic fields delivered through different toroids separated by 3 m. Although one would expect the reduction of cell numbers in the cultures injected with the peroxide, the non-local cultures that were not injected but shared the changing angular velocities of magnetic fields displayed a reduction of cells that was approximately 50% (about 60 to 70 cells per 1.5 mL or about 1.2 × 10 5 cells) compared to the control cells (those that were removed from the incubator and placed near the local and non-local spaces but beyond the intensity of the fields. The difference between the local and non-local effect was about 10 cells per 1.5 mL or about 1 to 2 × 10 4 cells.
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