Top PDF Children and young people’s mental health : policy, services, funding and education

Children and young people’s mental health : policy, services, funding and education

Children and young people’s mental health : policy, services, funding and education

£1.4 billion over the five years from 2015-16). Of the additional funding announced in March 2015, £1 billion is to be provided to start new access standards for children and adolescent services, which the 2015- 2017 Government anticipated would see 110,000 more children cared for over the next Parliament. The 2015 Government also committed to investing £118 million by 2018-19 to complete the roll-out of the Children and Young People’s IAPT (Improving Access to Psychological Therapies) programme, to ensure talking therapies are available throughout England. Alongside this, £75 million will be provided between 2015 and 2020 to provide perinatal and antenatal mental health support for women. The Department for Education will also invest £1.5 million to pilot joint training for designated leads in CAMHS services and schools to improve access to mental health services for children and young people. 17
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 07196, 11 July 2019 : Children and young people’s mental health :   policy, services, funding and education

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 07196, 11 July 2019 : Children and young people’s mental health : policy, services, funding and education

The NAO report acknowledged the significant challenges faced by the Government in transforming children and young people’s mental health service due to the historical under-investment in these services. The report stated that although the Government’s proposed programmes were an important step towards tacking the issues of parity of esteem between mental and physical health services, they did not go far enough. The report estimated that even if the Government’s ambitions in the NHS’s Forward View programme were achieved “there would remain significant unmet need for mental health services.” 34 The report stated that the “balance between pace, funding and need to test approaches means that the Green Paper will only be rolled out to 20–
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Children and young people’s mental health : policy, services, funding and education

Children and young people’s mental health : policy, services, funding and education

The Coalition Government committed to improving mental health for children and young people, as part of their commitment to achieving “parity of esteem” between physical and mental health, and to improving the lives of children and young people. The Government’s 2011 mental health strategy, No Health without Mental Health , pledged to provide early support for mental health problems, and the Deputy Prime Minister’s 2014 strategy, Closing the Gap: priorities for essential change in mental health , included actions such as improving access to psychological therapies for children and young people. The Department of Health and NHS England established a Children and Young People’s Mental Health and Wellbeing Taskforce which reported in March 2015 and set out ambitions for improving care over the next five years. The Coalition Government also pledged funding for children and adolescent mental health, detailed in the briefing.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07196, 1 August 2018: Children and young people’s mental health – policy, services, funding and education

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07196, 1 August 2018: Children and young people’s mental health – policy, services, funding and education

provide families with mental health support and support early intervention for young people 11 . In March 2015, the Department for Education announced an investment of £25 million for voluntary and community sector grants for organisations that work with vulnerable children and young people. For the first time, mental health was identified as a separate theme within the grants, and organisations specialising in child mental health care were awarded £4.9 million. This includes nearly £400,000 for Mind to develop a pilot promoting positive mental health and wellbeing in schools, and £440,000 for the Anna Freud Centre to create a comprehensive directory of all mental health services to provide an authoritative source of mental health information for schools. 12 Also in March 2015 the Government published a blueprint for school counselling services , which provides schools with practical, evidence- based advice on how to deliver high-quality school based counselling. 13 At the same time, the PSHE Association published guidance, funded by the Department for Education, on providing age-appropriate teaching about mental health problems.
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Children and young people’s mental health : policy, CAMHS services, funding and education

Children and young people’s mental health : policy, CAMHS services, funding and education

In the March 2015 Budget, the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced £1.25 billion of additional investment in mental health. £1 billion will be provided over the next five years to start new access standards for children and adolescent services, which the Government anticipates will see 110,000 more children cared for over the next Parliament. The Government has also committed to investing £118 million by 2018-19 to complete the roll-out of the Children and Young People’s IAPT programme, to ensure talking therapies are available throughout England. Alongside this, £75 million will be provided between 2015 and 2020 to provide perinatal and antenatal mental health support for women. The Department for Education will also invest £1.5 million to pilot joint training for designated leads in CAMHS
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Children and Young People s Mental Health Services Workforce Report for Local Authorities

Children and Young People s Mental Health Services Workforce Report for Local Authorities

Conclusion • We would like to thank all Local Authorities who took part in the Health Education England CYP MH services workforce data collection, and we hope you find this analysis useful in comparing your local position against national averages. In addition to the Local Authority data returns, Data has been submitted by NHS providers, youth offending teams, voluntary organisations and independent organisations. This stocktake is a key part of implementing the targets in the recently published NHS Long Term Plan which aims to significantly expand capacity in children and young people’s mental health services.
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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

In line with previous research, the professional services most commonly contacted for mental health reasons were teachers and GPs (Ford et al. 2007; Newlove and Delgado, 2015). This is not surprising as families tend to have ongoing and easy access to both schools and primary health care. The Government’s recent green paper ‘Transforming children and young people’s mental health provision’ recognises the importance of schools. The paper proposes that mental health support teams should work with a cluster of schools ensuring they are offering support to children and young people not in mainstream education, and that designated mental health leads should be based in schools (DH and DoE, 2017).
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Schools Mental Health Services and Young Children s Emotions, Behavior, and Learning

Schools Mental Health Services and Young Children s Emotions, Behavior, and Learning

RANDALL REBACK is an Assistant Professor of Economics and Urban Studies at Barnard College, Columbia University. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This research was supported by a grant from the American Educational Research Association, which receives funds for its AERA Grants Programs from the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics of the Institute of Education Sciences and the National Science Foundation under NSF Grant #RED-0310268. Opinions reflect those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of the granting agencies. I am grateful for this funding and for research assistance from Angelica Ortega, Alex Perl, Daisy Chu, Angel Lam, Amy Corrigan, and Diana Stastny. I thank Julie Cullen, Janet Currie, Steve Ross, Jane Waldfogel, participants at the American Education Finance Association conference and the Mental Health Services Research conference, and the editor and three anonymous referees for their helpful suggestions. I also thank the National Center for Education Statistics for pro- viding access to the restricted-use versions of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Survey–Kindergarten Cohort data and the Schools and Staffing Survey data. Any errors are my own.
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Improving children and young people’s mental health services

Improving children and young people’s mental health services

and accountability for spending and outcomes. Key findings Planning for transformation 5 The government faces significant challenges in transforming children and young people’s mental health services, as part of its commitment to parity of esteem between physical and mental health services. The government acknowledges that historically mental health services have been seen as of secondary importance to physical health services. Its periodic survey of the prevalence of mental health conditions among young people allows it to estimate overall need, but historically it has treated far fewer young people than this. In 2015, the most up-to-date estimate indicated that only around one-quarter of children and young people who needed support from mental health services could access those services. The government has endorsed a vision for improving support for children and young people’s mental health, set out in Future in Mind. Delivering this vision will require coordinated action across different parts of government – for example, health, education, local government and justice – and between national and local bodies. Each of these has its own priorities, funding challenges and accountability arrangements. Experience in other sectors also suggests that raising the profile of mental health support and services and reducing the stigma of mental illness may uncover previously unidentified further demand (paragraphs 1.3, 1.7, 1.10 to 1.12, 2.28, 3.18, 3.22 to 3.24 and Figures 4 and 18).
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Surrey Emotional Wellbeing and Mental Health Services for Children and Young People Needs Assessment Refresh

Surrey Emotional Wellbeing and Mental Health Services for Children and Young People Needs Assessment Refresh

this Service also provides training to schools. Sex and Relationship Education provides an opportunity for learning in this area and is a responsibility for all schools including academies and free schools. Table 11 also shows that the bullying rate has decreased but does not include the rising numbers of incidents of cyber bullying which has significant implications for emotional wellbeing and mental health of children. There is a gap in the recording of incidents of cyber bullying and in how schools can best respond to this at present. However a multi-agency e-safety sub group (of the Surrey Safeguarding Children Board) chaired by the Education Safeguarding Adviser is developing an action plan to address all on-line behaviour including training and awareness raising for staff, teachers and other professionals. In addition all schools are required to have an anti-bullying policy which will incorporate cyber bullying and an e-safety policy to address any online issues in school.
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Transformation of mental health services for children and young people in England

Transformation of mental health services for children and young people in England

(6) Facilitative administration is key to any effective service-improvement implementation and is central to the success of disseminating EBPs. Facilitative administration provides leadership and makes use of a range of data inputs to inform decision-making, support the overall processes, and keep staff organized and focused on the desired intervention outcomes. Policies, procedures, structures, culture, and climate are given careful attention to ensure they are aligned with the needs of practitioners learning and implementing EBPs. To this end, the training of service managers/clinical leads is an integral component of the project. This comprises approximately 12 days of training which aims to develop competency in leading service change to deliver evidence-based, quality-driven, outcomes-informed services. Additional aims are: (a) to have critical knowledge of the theoretical, research and implementation literature that underpins service change and (b) to enable service leaders to make the necessary changes in their services during the training course. The course typically involves producing a 4-5,000-word report on a local project, conducted as part of the training that initiates and evaluates a local service change consistent with the principles and ethos of the national project.
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Services for Children and Young People with Mental Health Needs. Lancashire s Local Offer. Lancashire s Health Services

Services for Children and Young People with Mental Health Needs. Lancashire s Local Offer. Lancashire s Health Services

1. Name of the service and what the service provides Lancashire Care NHS Foundation Trust - Child & Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) – Community Services Lancashire Care Foundation Trust Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) Tier 3 provide a service for children and young people aged 5-16 who have a range of emotional and behavioural difficulties. The service supports and promotes emotional health and wellbeing.

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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

The survey benefited from an expert steering group, we would like to thank Miranda Wolpert, Peter Fonagy, Catherine Newsome, Lucy Heyes, Helen Duncan, Jessica Sharp, David Lockwood, Jeremy Clark, Alexandra Lazaro, and Nilum Patel. NHS Digital commissioned the survey series with funding from the Department of Health and Social Care. We are particularly grateful to Dan Collinson, Alison Neave, Steven Webster, Jane Town, Ben Osborne and Kate Croft for their thoughtful

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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

The survey benefited from an expert steering group, we would like to thank Miranda Wolpert, Peter Fonagy, Catherine Newsome, Lucy Heyes, Helen Duncan, Jessica Sharp, David Lockwood, Jeremy Clark, Alexandra Lazaro and Nilum Patel. NHS Digital commissioned the survey series with funding from the Department of Health and Social Care. We are particularly grateful to Dan Collinson, Alison Neave, Steven Webster, Jane Town, Ben Osborne and Kate Croft for their thoughtful

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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

More recent follow-up studies of children with ADHD attending child mental health services found higher persistence rates into adulthood (van Lieshout et al., 2016). This topic report splits hyperactivity disorders into two categories: • Hyperkinetic disorder - Symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity are present and lead to impairment in several settings such as school or work, home life and leisure activities. Symptoms are evident by seven years old, and can be identified retrospectively

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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Discussion Most surveys measuring less common mental and neurodevelopmental conditions use short screening questionnaires to identify potential cases, these tend to overestimate prevalence. Other studies sift routine health and education data to identify recognised cases, but miss those children who were not recognised by services (Brugha et al., 2018). The last survey to have assessed the disorders covered in this report in a general population sample of children in England was the previous survey in this series, conducted in 2004. Change in rate since 2004 can be estimated because methods in those years were comparable, and our approach is less affected by changes in diagnostic criteria and clinical practice.
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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

The survey benefited from an expert steering group, we would like to thank Miranda Wolpert, Peter Fonagy, Catherine Newsome, Lucy Heyes, Helen Duncan, Jessica Sharp, David Lockwood, Jeremy Clark, Alexandra Lazaro, and Nilum Patel. NHS Digital commissioned the survey series with funding from the Department of Health and Social Care. We are particularly grateful to Dan Collinson, Alison Neave, Steven Webster, Jane Town, Ben Osborne and Kate Croft for their thoughtful

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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

After interviews were complete, a team of eleven trained clinical raters reviewed the data to reach disorder ratings for each participant. Raters applied the diagnostic criteria for specific disorders set out in the tenth International Classification of Disease (ICD-10) (WHO, 1992) and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM–5) (APA, 2013). Diagnostic classification systems were not used to diagnose the feeding, sleeping and elimination disorders as this was experimental work to see what proportion of families have problems in these domains that sound as if they would plausibly justify referral to specialist services.
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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

The survey benefited from an expert steering group, we would like to thank Miranda Wolpert, Peter Fonagy, Catherine Newsome, Lucy Heyes, Helen Duncan, Jessica Sharp, David Lockwood, Jeremy Clark, Alexandra Lazaro, and Nilum Patel. NHS Digital commissioned the survey series with funding from the Department of Health and Social Care. We are particularly grateful to Dan Collinson, Alison Neave, Steven Webster, Jane Town, Ben Osborne and Kate Croft for their thoughtful

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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

2. Hard to persuade GP, teacher or other professional to refer me 3. Was referred but specialist services were reluctant to see us 4. Didn't like what the specialist services offered us 5. Didn't think that specialists would be able to help 6. Worried about what other people may think of us 7. Worried that my child might be taken away from me 8. Had a bad experience with specialist services in the past 9. Difficult to arrange appointments for times we could manage 10. The specialist was too far away or too hard to get to

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