Top PDF Children’s Hospice: A Place to Stay, A Place to Play

Children’s Hospice: A Place to Stay, A Place to Play

Children’s Hospice: A Place to Stay, A Place to Play

86 | P a g e Within the United States only two children’s hospice centers exist. Sadly, the number of children who would benefit from these centers has risen. As more children require end-of-life care, there is a greater need for an end-of-life facility that combines the comforts of home with the medical needs of a hospital to accommodate these children and their families. In an effort to meet these needs, this thesis reviewed prominent children’s hospitals located around the eastern United States, focusing primarily on Golisano Children’s Hospital in Rochester, NY. With the dearth of children’s hospice centers in the eastern United States, the need for one is significant. Building a center in the Finger Lakes region and establishing a relationship with a children’s hospital such as Golisano would be greatly beneficial to all parties involved.
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A Place to Live, A Place to Stay

A Place to Live, A Place to Stay

How can the issue of housing for refugee resettlement be addressed in a way that enables national resettlement quotas to be filled on an annual and ongoing basis? What role does housing play in ensuring resettled refugees are able to settle, integrate and thrive in their new cities and municipalities? What good practice can we identify in housing for resettled refugees at the local, regional and national levels across Europe? How can we share it? In 2013-14, these questions led ICMC, together with our SHARE Network partners and stakeholders, to undertake a programme of research and evaluation to identify and record innovative and creative approaches to housing for resettled and other refugees. Our research focused on eight experienced and new European resettlement countries and one country currently without a resettlement programme 1 . To further develop our
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A place for play? The influence of the home physical environment on children’s physical activity and sedentary behaviour

A place for play? The influence of the home physical environment on children’s physical activity and sedentary behaviour

Observational studies that investigated the influence of the physical and social environment within the home space, found that the social environment, particularly the role of parents, was important. Experimental studies that changed the home physical environment by introducing a television limiting device successfully decreased television viewing, whereas the influence of introducing an active video game on activity outcomes was inconsistent. Results highlight that the home environment is an important influence on childrens sedentary behaviour and physical activity, about which much is still unknown. While changing or controlling the home physical environment shows promise for reducing screen based sedentary behaviour, further interventions are needed to understand the broader impact of these changes. Future studies should prioritise investigating the influence of the home physical environment, and its interaction with the social environment, on objectively measured sedentary time and home context specific behaviours, ideally including technologies that allow objective measures of the home space.
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Creating children’s spaces, children co-creating place

Creating children’s spaces, children co-creating place

When we arrived at the prep room my mum was worried that there did not seem much for me to do there. Some tables and chairs were there, but they were pushed against the wall with a big space in the middle for us all to sit, including my mum. Miss M said hello and then said that the room was our space for the year to make friends, to create, and to explore. Miss M. assured me that outside was our space also to make friends, to create, and to explore. From then on over the next few weeks we created places to learn and play with Miss M. Miss M even organized mums and dads and the cleaners to come and talk with us about their ideas for places in our room. We had to talk about the furniture and things around the room and think whether they were safe to move and put in different places. We used the bookshelf to put the books in, keep our home stuff safe, and make a quiet area for reading and listening to stories. Some friends used the large colourful scarves to dance with, and other friends used the scarves as sails on their boat. We set up a special display with all of our family photos so we could get to know everyone’s mums and dads and brothers and sisters. This was my friend Mack’s idea.
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The Place of Play in Ghana’s Early Childhood Education

The Place of Play in Ghana’s Early Childhood Education

The literature affirms the existence of different types of play. For example, Anderson-McNamee & Bailey (2010) presents the following as types of play; unoccupied play, solitary play, onlooker play, parallel play, associative play, social play, motor – physical plays, constructive play, expressive play, fantasy play, and cooperative play (p.2). Unoccupied play according to the authors constitutes play at the early months of the child where the child is busy engaged in unoccupied activities with no clear purpose. Solitary play on the other hand starts from three to 18 months where the child spends much of his/her time playing on her own. Descriptions for the other types of play are provided by the authors. For Woltberg (2003) however, play could be categorized based on what goes on during the activities that the child engages in the process of playing. For example, Dramatic play according to Woltberg (2003) is characteristic of children between the ages of 3-5 years old. The author indicates that, with this type of play, the child acts out specific roles, interact with one another in their roles, and plan how the play will go.
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Through place

Through place

inseparable from place (we are always both in a place and moving through a place), likewise certain images hold the viewer in the image. Other images contain almost a piece of a story or narrative, inviting interpretation but incomplete. The pictures give some information but hold some information back. For example, in the picture below, the juxtaposition of the light in the tree (and the unexpectedness of it being there at all) could be read to have any number of meanings. At the opening reception of the exhibition it was interesting to hear how many different interpretations people had of this picture. One person said it looked like a jewel in the tree, another person said it could be an eye, and someone else asked if it was a camera. In the context of the other pictures it is even more curious, since it is the only photograph in the series that includes a mechanical structure.
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A Place to Think

A Place to Think

my milieu, I was expected to carry the torch of the educational revolution, yet no one was asking how I - a still personally unavowed teacher now required to support other teachers through the upheaval - considered the plans and was experiencing their implementation. No one brought me to contemplate the tension I- or we - might feel between the imposed theory and the concrete practice in all of its nuances. No one asked me to situate my self in the midst of what was to be done. Maxine Greene (1978) says of teachers: “If they are personally involved in what can be a most demanding human enterprise, those others – students, or co–investigators – may be caught up much more readily than if the teachers’ sense–making efforts have all taken place in the past” (p. 3). No one prompted me to think along these lines. There was no time, no place to think. Who was I, who were we - each of us - in teaching? Aoki (2004) states that “there is forgetfulness that what matters deeply in the situated world of the classroom is how the teachers’ “doings” flow from who they are, their beings. That is, there is a forgetfulness that teaching is fundamentally a mode of being” (pp. 159-160). I was subject to that forgetfulness, and involved in perpetuating it. Were teachers and students faceless generics interacting over competency development and program expectations? In the dizzying speeds of the educational Autobahn, there was no place to remember, no place to think.
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The other place

The other place

History was inextricably bound up with trying to understand our adopted home while always looking back at the country of my birth, a place from which my parents were estranged. Our alienation was made plain when my mother’s parents came for a rare visit in 1965. Before their arrival my siblings and I were expected to know what Peter and Jane might take for granted. We were schooled in ‘manners’. The elderly grandparents arrived in suits of shiny, steel-coloured materials and there were rules that we could only surmise but which had to be observed to save my parents from embarrassment. Of course we failed miserably at this.
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Your Place or Mine: status and identity, space and place

Your Place or Mine: status and identity, space and place

This paper has focused on the influence of setting on the meetings of a research and practice network. It has sought to bring a social relational understanding of space to an examination of the behaviours of community-based practitioners (many of them graduates of the host institution) and academics. Findings suggest that using a range of venues, and avoiding Higher Education teaching rooms, may enable all members to become less prone to reverting to historical, hierarchical role-behaviours (Harre, 1993) and to engage more freely in order to further the development of the network as a whole. Situating a meeting in a community workplace might not impact on the habitus (Bourdieu, 1989) of participants, but it does emphasise and validate the work taking place outside the world of academia, emphasising the ‘practice’ element of the Research and Practice Network. The use of a virtual space was endorsed by members, but not used in practice.
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Commuting in Catalonia: Estimates from a place-to-place model

Commuting in Catalonia: Estimates from a place-to-place model

gives us two obvious choices to include: housing prices and home sizes. We should also consider other amenities that could influence residential decisions: some authors have tried to use a full set of amenity variables, including climatic, cultural, crime and urban structure variables. If correctly specified, this approach is appealing because these variables could inform us about what families are looking for when choosing a place to live, but it also brings out some important problems:

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A place for everything, everything in its place Benjamin Franklin

A place for everything, everything in its place Benjamin Franklin

source: Enterprise Patterns and MDA: Building Better Software with Archetype Patterns and UML By Jim Arlow , Ila Neustadt.. General Idea[r]

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Changing place: palm oil and sense of place in Borneo

Changing place: palm oil and sense of place in Borneo

The interviews were conducted from August to November 2008 in Sabah, held either at the interviewee’s place of work or at a pre-arranged meeting place. A total of 12 respondents were recruited (via a snowballing approach) to the study, including 2 officials from a government environmental protection department, 5 managers from 2 oil palm plantations (1 individual interview and 1 group meeting), 1 university ecologist and 4 representatives of Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) (3 environmental NGOs and 1 community- based NGO concerned with indigenous rights). These respondents could be loosely termed as conservationists (representatives from the government departments, NGOs and the university academic – B01, B02, B03, B06, B07, B08 & B09) and producers (oil palm plantation managers – B04 and group meeting B05). Interviews were analysed using the grounded theory – constant comparison method, where each item is compared with the rest of the data to establish and refine analytical categories (Pope et al. 2000). Atlas Ti was used for data exploration and storage.
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Living in Place: A Study of Vitality through Sense of Place

Living in Place: A Study of Vitality through Sense of Place

Historically, this neighborhood in Pittsford comprised one large tract of farmland. Now, the farmland is a defining boundary of the neighborhood, rather than an effective part of it, and although the farmhouse that once served as a center and focal point of this area still stands, it is distant and largely hidden from view, and the homes in this tract bear no relation to it (Figures 112, 113). From the standpoint of a spirit of identity and attachment, the views of theorists such as Goldhagen are worth repeating, in which she expresses that when “people lay claim to a piece of land, constructing buildings, organizing and shaping its voids into action settings, it is no longer just an abstraction, a geographic point on a map. What was once just territory becomes a place, which means that it is imbued with social meaning.” (Goldhagen 2017, 199). The neighborhood in Pittsford does, in its own way, reflect a social meaning, although it is not one that appears supportive of the needs of the aging as discussed in the sociological and
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A Place at the Stable

A Place at the Stable

not know him. 11 He came to what was his own, and his own people did not accept him. 12 But to all who received him, who believed in his name, he gave power to become children of God, 13 who were born, not of blood or of the will of the flesh or of the will of man, but of God.

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Aufenthaltsort / Place of stay Stadt / Town :... Termin / Dates of stay:...

Aufenthaltsort / Place of stay Stadt / Town :... Termin / Dates of stay:...

Name / Surname :...................................................... Vorname / First name :……….................................................. Geburtsdatum / Date of birth :................................... Geburtsort / Place of birth:…………………………………... Staatsangehörigkeit / Nationality :…………………. Alter / Age :…………………………………………………. Geschlecht / Sex :…………………………………… Religion :……………………………………………………. Anschrift / Address :………………………………………………………………………………………………….. PLZ / Postal code :………. Stadt / Town : ………………………. Land / Country : ……………………………….. Telefon / Phone number :.………………………….. Fax :…………………………. Email :……………………… Beruf der Mutter / Mother’s occupation :…………………Beruf der Vaters / Father’s occupation : ………………. Zahl der Geschwister / Number of sisters and brothers :…………. Alter / Ages :…………………………………... Kontaktperson für Notfälle (Name und Telefon) / Contact in case of emergency (name and phone number) :........... ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….... Welche Sportarten treiben Sie ? / What kinds of sports do you do ?............................................................................. Hobbys und Interessen / Hobbies and special interests :……………………………………………………………...
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More than a place to live it s a place to thrive!

More than a place to live it s a place to thrive!

The grant supports Bethany Life’s Home for Life Solutions Program and arrived with this message from Cynthia Halverson, Executive Director of the ELCA Foundation; “We rejoice and g[r]

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TORMENT GREAT GULF ABRAHAM S BOSOM Place of the unbelieving dead. LUKE 16:26 Place of the believing dead.

TORMENT GREAT GULF ABRAHAM S BOSOM Place of the unbelieving dead. LUKE 16:26 Place of the believing dead.

HE TOO WAS THEN SEPARATED FROM GOD AT DEATH(God can not look upon sin Isa.59:2)AND WENT TO HADES IN OUR PLACE, SO WE WOULD NOT HAVE TO GO THERE. Matt.27:46; Heb. 2:9; IT COST JESUS HIS LIFE TO FREE US FROM THE BONDAGE OF satan ,1 Cor.6:10; I Peter 1:19; I Cor.7:23.

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Quest for Place  through  the  Reconstruction  of  History, Cultural  and  Ethnic  Belonging in Sally Morgan ‘s  MY PLACE : A  Postcolonial Study

Quest for Place through the Reconstruction of History, Cultural and Ethnic Belonging in Sally Morgan ‘s MY PLACE : A Postcolonial Study

visiting her own community, her own folk in North, she comes into the contact with language of her own community when one old man says, ’’I speak four languages. Light and heavy Nami, Balgoo and Nungamarda and Nybali. Your mother’s language would be Balgoo...’’ (Morgan 222). Sally makes her quest to discover her cultural and ethnic belonging by visiting the Place of origin of their community. She visits her own folk in the North where people of her community greets her by saying ‘’you are my people’’, and, ‘’this is your place, too’’. (Morgan 234). Visiting in the north Sally attains many aspects of ethnic belonging. Wherever they visit, they get the trace of their ethnic belonging, the trace of their own community and family to follow. Each person she comes into contact with, becomes her relative and this gives her sense of ethnic belonging and it becomes clear when another man says ‘’ Your mob’s from Corunna. You’d be related to most of the people around here, one way or another.’’ (Morgan 220). These encounters accelerate her sense of cultural and ethnic belonging.
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A sense of place.

A sense of place.

intellectual viewpoint. In 'Dangerous Ground' I attempted to venture further in defining an emotional state in terms of a physical location. In 'Like I don’t like' I speak of words ‘moving in’ as an example of the way words re-establish their place in an evolving continuum. In 'Simnai' I was attempting to describe a connection between two places. The chimney is the artery connecting the old Welsh ‘parlwr’ with all its cultural connotations as a private place, a room set aside for lovers and coffins and the reading of wills, and the wider world and more honest space beyond.!
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The Facets of Place

The Facets of Place

In order to develop further an understanding of how architectural styles may be considered, within a theory of place perspective, it is useful to review briefly the central discussions of differences in style that have been characteristic of aesthetic criticism. Historians of Art and Architecture have always pointed to a clear distinction between the classical and the romantic approaches to the creation of art forms in all media, including architecture. In the classical styles there are pure abstract rules that are seen as being free of culture and related to effects that are immediate and personal. Collins dictionary defines classical as 'marked by stability of form, intellectualism and restraint'. The romantic style by contrast is more local, it does not espouse abstract principles that define what is good and bad. The Collins definition is 'an emphasis on feeling and content rather than order and form .... the free expression of the passions and individuality'. In his extensive review of the history of art Gombrich (1950) showed in considerable detail how these broad movements in art touched every aspect of their activities, so that the terms 'romantic' and 'classical' could be taken as summaries of a conglomeration of objectives that the designers themselves were espousing.
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