Top PDF Children and Young People’s Mental Health: State of the Nation: April 2016

Children and Young People’s Mental Health: State of the Nation: April 2016

Children and Young People’s Mental Health: State of the Nation: April 2016

areas had transition protocols, and of those that were in existence, not all met the requirements set by government policy. The estimated annual average number of cases considered suitable for transfer to adult services per CAMHS team was greater than the annual average number of cases actually accepted by adult services, meaning that some people simply no longer received services at all even where their current service provider felt they needed them. The study found that a major omission from protocols was procedures to ensure continuity of care for patients not accepted by adult services. This gap is of great concern given that mental health problems often emerge in late adolescence and young people are losing touch with services or having their care disrupted at a crucial point where early intervention could make a significant difference to their future health and wellbeing 72 .
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The state of Victoria s young people

The state of Victoria s young people

These findings illustrate the impact that their experiences of abuse and trauma have had on the mental health status and wellbeing of young people in State care, and the significant challenges we face in providing them with appropriate care. There is a clear need to further strengthen our service response to better meet the needs of these children, and this requires joint effort across numerous areas of Government. In Victoria, significant investment is occuring through services such as Take Two, which provides intensive support to children and young people displaying significant emotional and behavioural difficulties as a result of abuse, and the Therapeutic Foster Care program which seeks to provide care better able to meet the therapeutic needs of children. The Hurstbridge Farm Therapeutic Care service is another example of our focus on meeting therapeutic and mental health needs. The out-of-home care service system continues to strive to improve the quality of services, so that the care young people receive provides a therapeutic response which is able to address immediate needs and improve long term outcomes.
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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

The Mental Health of Children and Young People (MHCYP) survey was conducted with 5 to 15 year olds living in Britain in 1999 and 5 to 16 year olds living in Britain in 2004. The 1999 and 2004 surveys sampled from child benefit records. For the 2017 survey a stratified multistage random probability sample of 18,029 children was drawn from NHS Patient Register in October 2016. Children and young people were eligible to take part if they were aged 2 to 19, lived in England, and were registered with a GP. Children, young people and their parents were interviewed face-to-face at home using a combination of Computer Assisted Personal Interview (CAPI) and Computer Assisted Self Interview (CASI), between January and October 2017. A short paper or online questionnaire was completed by a nominated teacher for children aged 5 to 16 years old. Data collection varied with the selected child’s age:
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Care in mind : improving the mental health of children and young people in state care in Scotland

Care in mind : improving the mental health of children and young people in state care in Scotland

children and young people accommodated in residential units in Edinburgh, East Lothian and Midlothian (Grant et al, 2002; Residential Care Health Project, 2004). The project aimed to work with social work and education colleagues in order to establish a holistic approach to the provision of health care and health promotion for these young people. At first there were no mental health staff in the team but upon undertaking their first visits to the residential units and asking what the main health problems were they rapidly found out that mental or emotional problems were a high priority for the care staff (Grant, 2001). The team then added a psychiatric nurse to their complement. The work of the project mental health practitioner developed in the areas of: consultation with staff about young people; liaison between the residential units and child and adolescent mental health services; direct work with young people; training; and helping the project staff to understand residential unit staff’s difficulties in working with very troubled young people (Residential Care Health Project, 2004). The mental health component of the project has now evolved into the much more fully staffed CONNECT service which Lothian Health Board has established to provide a service to all looked after and accommodated children.
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Improving children and young people’s mental health services

Improving children and young people’s mental health services

3.5 In 2015-16 NHS England undertook a one-off exercise to gain assurance that local transformation plans were in line with national Future in Mind priorities. Plans for 2015-16 had to be assessed as satisfactory before CCGs could receive any additional funding. NHS England told us that it did not withhold transformation funding from any area due to unsatisfactory transformation plans, although some areas had to resubmit plans before they were considered satisfactory. After the first year, NHS England’s regional teams carried out assurance of the local transformation plans as part of its business-as-usual oversight of CCGs, and funding was provided to CCGs as part of their established funding settlement (rather than as a separate payment). NHS England also told us that each year it conducts an exercise centrally to gain assurance that local transformation plans have been refreshed. The regional teams review plans for each local area, with the assurance processes varying within and between regions. There are ‘key lines of enquiry’ issued each year to set priorities for plans, but there are no national measurable objectives relating to the quality of plans or the extent to which they meet the key lines of enquiry. 3.6 Despite NHS England’s processes to quality assure local transformation plans, its monitoring of spending and performance for children and young people’s mental health services remains at a CCG and STP level, rather than a local transformation plan level (in line with its responsibilities for holding CCGs and STPs to account for NHS spending). However, NHS England required CCGs to engage with local partners outside the NHS in developing their local transformation plans, and also required that plans were agreed by local health and well-being boards (local boards that include both local authority and CCG representation). This means there is very limited national oversight of local transformation plans in transforming children and young people’s mental health services. As part of the Forward View reporting, CCGs assessed their own performance in transforming services, including whether they had refreshed their local transformation plan and whether they had met key milestones in service transformation. By quarter 4 of 2016-17, 42% of CCGs reported via their self-assessment that they were fully confident in their own transformation.
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Children and Young People s Mental Health Services Workforce Report for Local Authorities

Children and Young People s Mental Health Services Workforce Report for Local Authorities

• This bespoke report outlines the Local Authority findings from a national stocktake of the Children and Young People’s mental health (CYP MH) workforce across England. The project was commissioned by Health Education England (HEE) and undertaken by the NHS Benchmarking Network (NHSBN). The project builds on a previous study undertaken by the NHSBN for HEE in 2016.

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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

The Mental Health of Children and Young People (MHCYP) survey was conducted with 5 to 15 year olds living in Britain in 1999 and 5 to 16 year olds living in Britain in 2004. The 1999 and 2004 surveys sampled from Child Benefit records. For the 2017 survey a stratified multistage random probability sample of 18,029 children was drawn from NHS Patient Register in October 2016. Children and young people were eligible to take part if they were aged 2 to 19, lived in England, and were registered with a GP. Children, young people and their parents were interviewed face-to-face at home using a combination of Computer Assisted Personal Interview (CAPI) and Computer Assisted Self Interview (CASI), between January and October 2017. A short paper or online questionnaire was completed by a nominated teacher for children aged 5 to 16 years old. Data collection varied with the selected child’s age:
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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

White British children were about three times more likely to be identified with ASD than Black or Asian children. Research on variation by ethnic group is mixed, and migration status may compound the relationship (Becerra et al., 2014). The higher rate of diagnosis in White British children has been thought to relate to greater treatment and service access. England’s survey of mental health in adults found White British people with a common mental disorder to have higher levels of treatment access than people of other ethnic groups (Lubian et al., 2016). Recent research has also found that members of minority ethnic groups may hold more self-stigmatising views of autism (Papadopulous, 2016). This could be a factor shaping higher levels of social desirability bias in reporting of symptoms in children with minority ethnic parents. Almost all the children in the sample identified on the spectrum were recognised as having special educational needs, and they make up a sizeable minority of the special educational needs group as a whole (one in seven). The survey data indicates the extent to which schools and education services may have autistic pupils in their communities.
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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

The Mental Health of Children and Young People (MHCYP) survey was conducted with 5 to 15 year olds living in Britain in 1999 and 5 to 16 year olds living in Britain in 2004. The 1999 and 2004 surveys sampled from Child Benefit records. For the 2017 survey a stratified multistage random probability sample of 18,029 children was drawn from NHS Patient Register in October 2016. Children and young people were eligible to take part if they were aged 2 to 19, lived in England, and were registered with a GP. Children, young people and their parents were interviewed face-to-face at home using a combination of Computer Assisted Personal Interview (CAPI) and Computer Assisted Self Interview (CASI), between January and October 2017. A short paper or online questionnaire was completed by a nominated teacher for children aged 5 to 16 years old. Data collection varied with the selected child’s age:
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Are the Children Well? A Model and Recommendations for Promoting the Mental Wellness of the Nation s Young People

Are the Children Well? A Model and Recommendations for Promoting the Mental Wellness of the Nation s Young People

Difficult to quantify, but essential to identify, are the costs and burdens that stem from society’s unhelpful attitudes. People facing mental health challenges are subject to social exclusion and stigma comparable to that associated with skin color, ethnicity, or sexual orientation—a response that has been described as a ―second illness.‖ 19 Prejudice, which includes neglect as well as active harm, can cause stress that contributes to further ill health. 20 Stigma associated with mental illness can delay or prevent individuals from seeking help, or cause them to terminate treatment early. 20, 21 Mental health professionals themselves can be both victims and perpetrators of the negative stereotypes associated with mental illness. 22 Finally, because of stigma, society loses out on the valuable contributions that excluded members could be making. Illness—regardless of the form it takes—deserves a compassionate response. Mental health conditions are no more a reflection of defects in character or personal motivation than are asthma or diabetes. Nor are mental health disorders, as a group, any more innate or predetermined, or a consequence of bad choices, than are other illnesses. In fact, as we will elaborate on further in this report, nearly all aspects of our health stem from how we and our environments interact. 23
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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

The Mental Health of Children and Young People (MHCYP) survey was conducted with 5 to 15 year olds living in Britain in 1999 and 5 to 16 year olds living in Britain in 2004. The 1999 and 2004 surveys sampled from Child Benefit records. For the 2017 survey a stratified multistage random probability sample of 18,029 children was drawn from NHS Patient Register in October 2016. Children and young people were eligible to take part if they were aged 2 to 19, lived in England, and were registered with a GP. Children, young people and their parents were interviewed face-to-face at home using a combination of Computer Assisted Personal Interview (CAPI) and Computer Assisted Self Interview (CASI), between January and October 2017. A short paper or online questionnaire was completed by a nominated teacher for children aged 5 to 16 years old. Data collection varied with the selected child’s age:
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Children and Young People’s Mental Health: time to deliver

Children and Young People’s Mental Health: time to deliver

The Education Policy Institute would also like to thank the following people and organisations who have helped with the research for this report: The Association of State Girls’ Schools; Peter Hindley, Royal College of Psychiatry; Max Davie, Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health; Steve Mallen, MindED Trust; Helen Pye, South West Yorkshire NHS Partnership Foundation Trust; Paul Jenkins, Chief Executive, and Paul Burstow, Chair, Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust; Professor Jim McManus, Director of Public Health, Hertfordshire County Council; Revd Dr Brendan McCarthy, National Adviser: Medical Ethics and Health and Social Care Policy, The Archbishops’ Council, The Church of England; Dr Sam Royston, Director of Policy and Research, The Children’s Society; Fergus Crowe, Chief Executive, Winston’s Wish; Andy Bell and Lorraine Khan, Centre for Mental Health; Max Birchwood, Professor of Youth Mental Health, Warwick Medical School; Catherine Roche, Chief Executive, Place2Be; the Anna Freud Family School; Duncan Law, Anna Freud Centre; Zoe Mulliez, Healthwatch England; Liz Maudslay and Pirandeep Dhillon, Association of Colleges; Laurie Oliva, Young Minds; Professor Isobel Heyman, Great Ormond Street Hospital; Tony Childs, HSCIC; Alan Wardle, NSPCC; Sarah Woodhouse, Turning Point; Dr Ann York CQC; Nerys Anthony, Director, Young People Health and Wellbeing, Catch 22; Barbara Rayment, Youth Access; Neil Ralph, Health Education England; Jeff Halperin, Camden and Islington Foundation Trust; Emma Wilson, CRN Mental Health Young Person’s Advisory Group; Sinem Cakir, Chief Executive, MAC UK; Laura Abbott, Chilypep; Janet Johnson, Oxfordshire County Council; Brigid Reid and colleagues, Barnsley Clinical Commissioning Group; Barbara Herts and Claire Hardy and colleagues, Essex County Council; Becky Anderton, Elaine Kirwan, Dr Anupam Dharma, Chris Spence and colleagues from Forward Thinking Birmingham; Rob Willoughby, Children’s Society; Lajla Johansson and colleagues; Oxfordshire Clinical Commissioning Group; Lynn Smith, Oxfordshire County Council; Dr Mina Fazel, Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford; Mental Health in Society Training, especially Dr Elizabeth Artingstall, Consultant Forensic Psychiatrist, Dr Sile McDaid, Consultant Child & Adolescent Psychiatrist and Mrs Karen Burns, Chief Executive of Academy Trust and Executive Principal.
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Mental Health Service Models for Young People

Mental Health Service Models for Young People

MH services provided in schools are some of the most accessible for CYP. This is because most CYP attend school, access to schools-based services does not require a clinical diagnosis, and schools are often the first point of contact for CYP and their families when they begin to experience MH problems. A 2017 joint report by the Health and Education Select Committees emphasised the importance of a whole-school approach to MH, MH training for teachers, and co-ordinating schools and CYPMHS. 29

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A systematic review of reviews of interventions to promote mental health and prevent mental health problems in children and young people

A systematic review of reviews of interventions to promote mental health and prevent mental health problems in children and young people

The search yielded seven systematic reviews of parenting programmes (Barlow et al., 2004; Bakermans-Kranenburg et al., 2003; Barlow & Parsons, 2003; Barnes & Freude-Lagevardi, 2003; Barlow & Stewart-Brown, 2000; Serketich & Dumas, 1996; Cedar & Levant, 1990). Five of these reviews examined the effectiveness of behavioural and other types of structured parenting programmes for all ages of children. Two reviews focused on early preventive interventions; one covered programmes aiming to enhance positive parental behaviours across four categories (sensitivity; support; representation; and two or more of these combined) (Bakermans- Kranenburg et al., 2003); the second covered programmes aiming to improve parenting, family functioning and young children’s mental health more generally (Barnes & Freude-Lagevardi, 2003). Two reviews were excluded: one summarising the literature on parenting support programmes because it
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Young People s Emotional Health

Young People s Emotional Health

Emotional health is about the way we think and feel, and the ability to cope with difficult things in life. If something happens and we feel low emotionally, getting back on track can be difficult. Good emotional health is important for young people as they have to make choices about studying, careers and other areas of their lives. At the same time, young people are also developing greater independence and responsibilities, and experiencing changes in the way they think and feel. Many young people have strong coping strategies and are generally resilient to these challenges, but some will need additional help to develop resilience and stay emotionally healthy.
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An Internet for Children and Young People: 17 Novemeber 2016

An Internet for Children and Young People: 17 Novemeber 2016

national and global action to end the online sexual exploitation of children, working together to identify and safeguard more victims of this terrible crime and apprehend more perpetrators. It was launched in London nearly two years ago. Since then, it has merged with the Global Alliance Against Child Sexual Abuse Online. This has created, for the first time, a single global initiative with the expertise, influence and resources to transform how this crime is dealt with worldwide. By joining up our efforts across national borders, we can guarantee children the future that they deserve and secure their safety in the digital world. I am really pleased the UK IGF is hosting a youth panel this year, and that they will have the opportunity to share their views with you on what everyone has been discussing today.
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Protecting and improving the nation s health. Specialist substance misuse treatment for young people in England

Protecting and improving the nation s health. Specialist substance misuse treatment for young people in England

small decline, although it is also possible that a contraction in the provision of universal and targeted services may have affected the number of referrals. Almost all the young people who entered specialist services during the year were seen quickly – 99% waited fewer than three weeks from the point of referral to the first appointment, with the average wait just under two days. Young people are still most likely to seek help for problems with cannabis. During 2013-14, 13,659 under-18s presented to specialist services with cannabis as their primary problem drug (71% of all those receiving help during the year), up slightly from 13,581 last year. This is the highest number of young people presenting for help with cannabis since records began in 2005-06. Alcohol was the next primary substance, with 3,776 young people (20% of the total in treatment) seeking help during 2013-14. This is down from 4,704 (24%) last year and significantly lower than the 2008-09 peak of 8,799 (37%). It is now at its lowest ever level. The number of young people with heroin as their primary substance has been falling consistently since 2005-06, when there were was 881 young people. This year, it dropped to a new low of 160. As well as primary substances (ie, the substance that young people say is their main problem when they are first assessed by services), NDTMS records adjunctive use – this is a second or even third substance that may be causing problems. Young people with misuse problems tend not to focus on one particular substance and often use a range of drugs. The figures for adjunctive use show that alcohol remains an issue since a further 35% of young people reported it. An extra 14% said cannabis was an adjunctive drug and 13% reported ‘other’ drugs, mainly tobacco and hallucinogens. The overall number of young people reporting problems with club drugs fell this year. NDTMS defines a club drug user as anybody seeking help for GHB/GBL, ketamine, ecstasy, methamphetamine or mephedrone. Figures for club drugs combine primary and adjunctive data. Although the number of ketamine users went up from 345 to 419 and ecstasy users from 997 to
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Inpatient provision for children and young people with mental health problems. July 2017

Inpatient provision for children and young people with mental health problems. July 2017

on patients with anorexia nervosa, inpatient care and community provision show similar results which has led to a debate about the value of inpatient treatment for this disorder. For young people with psychosis, intensive care in the community appears to be as effective as admission. For the above reasons, any discussion of capacity within inpatient care also needs to consider the availability of appropriate care in the community. Some areas provide intensive community services which can help young people avoid admission to hospital, or to be discharged from hospital back to their local community. They can track high-risk patients in the community or provide back up support for young people remaining with their families or in the care of their local authority. These services are often described as ‘Tier 3 plus’ or ‘intensive outreach’ services. The Royal College of Psychiatrists recommends that “Intensive outreach services should be comprehensively commissioned by responsible commissioning groups and health boards to ensure an even distribution around the UK”. 59
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Young People s. Mental Health ServicesSe. RDaSH leading the way with care

Young People s. Mental Health ServicesSe. RDaSH leading the way with care

Offers information about anxiety and explains different techniques to help support a child experiencing anxiety. There is also an Advice Hub that offers advice and answers questions abo[r]

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School nurses' perspectives on managing mental health problems in children and young people

School nurses' perspectives on managing mental health problems in children and young people

The CAMHS Review (2008) acknowledges that confidence can be an issue for school nurses, and education and training is an issue that has been previously picked up in the literature, although often with regard to childcare professionals in general (NHS HAS 1995, Leighton et al. 2003, Etheridge 2004, Gowers et al. 2004, CAMHS Review 2008, WHO/HBSCF 2008, Wilson et al. 2008). Confidence and education are closely related, and it is likely that opportunities for formal education and training will also lead to enhanced confidence. How such education and training might be shaped can be determined from what the literature and the participants in this study have to say. First, as Clarke et al. (2003) and Chipman and Gooch (2003) note, CAMHS experts need to take the lead. Second, there needs to be clear and practical information about the specific mental health topics (such as eating disorders and self-harm) that concern school nurses (Leighton et al. 2003, NISHYP 2006, Wilson et al. 2008). Third, CAMHS experts need to support school nurses on a regular basis,
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