Top PDF Children and Young People’s Mental Health: time to deliver

Children and Young People’s Mental Health: time to deliver

Children and Young People’s Mental Health: time to deliver

Max Birchwood, Professor of Youth Mental Health, Warwick Medical School; Catherine Roche, Chief Executive, Place2Be; the Anna Freud Family School; Duncan Law, Anna Freud Centre; Zoe Mulliez, Healthwatch England; Liz Maudslay and Pirandeep Dhillon, Association of Colleges; Laurie Oliva, Young Minds; Professor Isobel Heyman, Great Ormond Street Hospital; Tony Childs, HSCIC; Alan Wardle, NSPCC; Sarah Woodhouse, Turning Point; Dr Ann York CQC; Nerys Anthony, Director, Young People Health and Wellbeing, Catch 22; Barbara Rayment, Youth Access; Neil Ralph, Health Education England; Jeff Halperin, Camden and Islington Foundation Trust; Emma Wilson, CRN Mental Health Young Person’s Advisory Group; Sinem Cakir, Chief Executive, MAC UK; Laura Abbott, Chilypep; Janet Johnson, Oxfordshire County Council; Brigid Reid and colleagues, Barnsley Clinical Commissioning Group; Barbara Herts and Claire Hardy and colleagues, Essex County Council; Becky Anderton, Elaine Kirwan, Dr Anupam Dharma, Chris Spence and colleagues from Forward Thinking Birmingham; Rob Willoughby, Children’s Society; Lajla Johansson and colleagues; Oxfordshire Clinical Commissioning Group; Lynn Smith, Oxfordshire County Council; Dr Mina Fazel, Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford; Mental Health in Society Training, especially Dr Elizabeth Artingstall, Consultant Forensic Psychiatrist, Dr Sile McDaid, Consultant Child & Adolescent Psychiatrist and Mrs Karen Burns, Chief Executive of Academy Trust and Executive Principal.
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Children and Young People s Mental Health Services Workforce Report for Local Authorities

Children and Young People s Mental Health Services Workforce Report for Local Authorities

Time in post The analysis of time in post data for staff working for CYP MH services in LAs suggests that 71% of the staff have been in their current post for 5 years or less. 14% have been in post for less than 12 months. This may be due to internal transfers and promotions, or may reflect funding provision that is time-limited leading to shorter term contracts historically (though 85% of staff now in post have permanent arrangements).

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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

We are also indebted to the team of ONS and NatCen interviewers who spent countless hours interviewing participants who took part in this survey. Clinical raters undertook the enormous task of reviewing information on all the children and young people who took part. From the University of Exeter College of Medicine and Health these included Carmen Apostu, Pamela Bowman, Tamsin Newlove- Delgado, Oana Mitrofan and Eva Wooding. From Kings College London: Sophie Epstein, Andrew McWilliams, Helena Hamilton, Christine Kuhn. Thanks to Bruce Clark and the Body Dysmorphic Disorder team from South London and Maudsley Hospital for independently rating the BDD diagnoses.
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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

They can occur when the young person thinks about going out, or travelling as well as in the actual situation. Panic disorder Characterised by recurrent attacks of severe anxiety or panic which are not restricted to a particular situation and often ‘come out of the blue’. Symptoms of anxiety in this condition are intense. They start suddenly, peak in a few minutes and include the sudden onset of palpitations, chest pain, choking sensations and dizziness . Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Certain groups of children are more likely than others to have a behavioural disorder. Boys remain more likely than girls, and rates peaked in 11 to 16 year olds and were lowest in those aged 17 to 19. Caution, however, is needed with interpretation of the tail off in rates in this older age group. A diagnosis of behavioural disorder ideally needs evidence of impairment in different settings: and valid reports of this are easier to achieve with parent and/or teacher reports. Teacher reports were not obtained for any 17 to 19 year olds on the survey, and about half of 17 to 19 year olds did not have a responding parent. Given non-compliance is an aspect of behavioural disorder, it is likely that survey non-response will also be higher in this group. Another feature of this analysis also impacts on the ability to compare 5 to 16 year old participants with those aged 17 to 19: prevalence in the younger group was uprated with a small adjustment factor (1.06) that took account of the fact that some in this age group did not have a teacher report. Adjustment factors – their rationale, calculation, and impact – are discussed more fully in the Survey Design and Methods Report.
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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

More recent follow-up studies of children with ADHD attending child mental health services found higher persistence rates into adulthood (van Lieshout et al., 2016). This topic report splits hyperactivity disorders into two categories: • Hyperkinetic disorder - Symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity are present and lead to impairment in several settings such as school or work, home life and leisure activities. Symptoms are evident by seven years old, and can be identified retrospectively

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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

While the rate of ASD appeared to be higher in younger age groups, this was not statistically significant. If the sample had been larger, it is possible that a difference in rates by age group might have been significant. Although developmental problems are often more common among younger children, research suggests that most adults with an ASD diagnosed in childhood struggle with significant impairment (Howlin et al., 2004). Because few parent reports and no teacher reports were obtained for those in the oldest age group, it had been expected that some cases of ASD might have been missed in this group. Other methodological factors, described in detail in the Survey Design and Methods Report, may also have affected the reliability of age group comparisons.
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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Rowland, Adam White, Alexandra Pop, Salah Merad and Dean Fletcher. We are also indebted to the team of ONS and NatCen interviewers who spent countless hours interviewing participants who took part in this survey. Clinical raters undertook the enormous task of reviewing information on all the children and young people who took part. From the University of Exeter College of Medicine and Health these included Carmen Apostu, Pamela Bowman, Tamsin Newlove- Delgado, Oana Mitrofan and Eva Wooding. From Kings College London: Sophie Epstein, Andrew McWilliams, Helena Hamilton, Christine Kuhn. Thanks to Bruce Clark and the Body Dysmorphic Disorder team from South London and Maudsley Hospital for independently rating the BDD diagnoses.
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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Measuring recognition of difficulties with emotions, concentration, behaviour or getting along with people The perception of a problem is one of the key requirements to accessing support, so the extent to which poor mental health is recognised as such is an important factor to consider when thinking about access to services (Wolpert and Ford, 2015). Children, particularly those of primary school age, rarely access services on their own behalf, which means the perception of important adults is crucial to their access to services in relation to their mental health. The extent to which parents or young people recognise mental health difficulties can be inferred from response to the first question on the impact supplement of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. This asks the parent or young person whether they consider that the child or they have a problem with emotions, concentration, behaviour or getting along with people. A report of definite or severe difficulties was considered to indicate the recognition of poor mental health and a report of no or minor problems to suggest that the parent or young
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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

38 Discussion The effects of new technology and social media on overall health and wellbeing are still relatively unknown. Sampasa-Kanyinga and Lewis (2015) found an independent association between using social media sites for more than two hours per day and self-reported poor mental health, increased levels of psychological distress and suicidal ideation. This prevalence survey also found an association between mental disorders and spending more than four hours on social media per day, whether it was a school or non-school day. Young people with a disorder were also more likely to agree that they spend longer online than they intend to.
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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

We are also indebted to the team of ONS and NatCen interviewers who spent countless hours interviewing participants who took part in this survey. Clinical raters undertook the enormous task of reviewing information on all the children and young people who took part. From the University of Exeter College of Medicine and Health these included Carmen Apostu, Pamela Bowman, Tamsin Newlove- Delgado and Oana Mitrofan. From Kings College London: Sophie Epstein, Andrew McWilliams, Helena Hamilton, Christine Kuhn. Thanks to Bruce Clark and the Body Dysmorphic Disorder team from South London and Maudsley Hospital for
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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

We are also indebted to team of ONS and NatCen interviewers who spent countless hours interviewing participants who took part in this this survey. Clinical raters undertook the enormous task of reviewing information on all the children and young people who took part. From the University of Exeter College of Medicine and Health these included Carmen Apostu, Pamela Bowman, Tamsin Newlove- Delgado, Oana Mitrofan and Eva Wooding. From Kings College London: Sophie Epstein, Andrew McWilliams, Helena Hamilton, Christine Kuhn. Thanks to Bruce Clark and the Body Dysmorphic Disorder team from South London and Maudsley Hospital for independently rating BDD diagnoses.
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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Around one in sixteen (6.4%) of 17 to 19 year olds experienced more than one mental disorder at the same time. The Mental Health of Children and Young People (MHCYP) surveywas previously conducted with 5 to 15 year olds in 1999 and 5 to 16 year olds in 2004, who were living in Britain and sampled from Child Benefit records. For the 2017 survey, a stratified multistage random probability sample of children was drawn from the NHS Patient Register in October 2016. Children and young people were eligible to take part if they were aged 2 to 19, lived in England, and were registered with a GP.
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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Many children and young people have some rituals or superstitions, e.g. not stepping on the cracks in the pavement, having to go through a special goodnight ritual, having to wear lucky clothes for exams, or needing a lucky mascot for school sports matches. It is also common for young people to go through phases when they seem obsessed by one particular subject or activity, e.g. cars, a pop group, a football team. But what we want to know is whether the child has any rituals or obsessions that go beyond this.

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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

inappropriate treatment. This information would not be available if other methods of collection were used, such as sampling from lists of patients in contact with mental health services, or patients registered with a general practitioner. This approach has quality implications for other survey aims. For example, a survey of the resident population excludes those who were living in a care home (for example mental health units and young offender institutions). As discussed in this publication, people living in such settings are likely to have worse mental health than those living in private households, which may have an effect on the quality of the prevalence estimates produced by this survey. However, the proportion of the overall population not living in private households is so small that this would have little (or no significant) impact on the prevalence estimates for the disorders examined, as such the decision was made that the improvement in the survey’s ability to provide an estimate of the treatment gap justified this trade-off between these two survey outcomes. Details of the strengths and limitations of the results of this survey are detailed in full in the Survey Design and Methods Report.
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Transformation of mental health services for children and young people in England

Transformation of mental health services for children and young people in England

(6) Facilitative administration is key to any effective service-improvement implementation and is central to the success of disseminating EBPs. Facilitative administration provides leadership and makes use of a range of data inputs to inform decision-making, support the overall processes, and keep staff organized and focused on the desired intervention outcomes. Policies, procedures, structures, culture, and climate are given careful attention to ensure they are aligned with the needs of practitioners learning and implementing EBPs. To this end, the training of service managers/clinical leads is an integral component of the project. This comprises approximately 12 days of training which aims to develop competency in leading service change to deliver evidence-based, quality-driven, outcomes-informed services. Additional aims are: (a) to have critical knowledge of the theoretical, research and implementation literature that underpins service change and (b) to enable service leaders to make the necessary changes in their services during the training course. The course typically involves producing a 4-5,000-word report on a local project, conducted as part of the training that initiates and evaluates a local service change consistent with the principles and ethos of the national project.
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Enhancing the care of children and young people with mental health issues

Enhancing the care of children and young people with mental health issues

and Newton (2014), suggest nurses desire ongoing development and postulate that a ward environment is the best place to achieve this with education at a ward-based level enabling healthcare professionals to feel empowered in the care of patients with mental illnesses. To ensure any education plan for ongoing development is sustainable it is recommended the ward regularly review the training needs of the ward staff to ensure nurses are receiving relevant and up-to-date knowledge (Holloway et al., 2018). Champion models have been developed for many years and are widely used in the NHS (Sutton et al., 2018). An adolescent champion model was implemented in a UK hospital (Riley, Patterson, Lane, Won, and Ranalli, 2018), and analysis of the model was from the perspective of the patient; identifying that patient feedback was positive and there was an increase in patient
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Mental health of children and young people in Great Britain, 2004

Mental health of children and young people in Great Britain, 2004

He is all over the place – always on the move. He won’t sit still at the table while we are eating – it’s fidgeting the whole time, getting up between courses. He’d get up between mouthfuls if I let him. If there’s a task that needs doing, whether it’s homework or tidying his room, he’ll start willingly but within a few minutes he’s been distracted and begun doing something else instead. Sometimes, it is just an excuse and he never really wanted to do it anyway, but there are many times when I’m sure he couldn’t help it. The teachers complain too, but I think they agree that it’s the way he is made. Outside the family he is quite shy, and this keeps him a bit under control. But within the family,
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Mental health of children and young people in Great Britain, 2004

Mental health of children and young people in Great Britain, 2004

and non-professional services because they were worried about their child’s emotions, behaviour or concentration. Over three-quarters (81 per cent) of parents of children with a conduct disorder had sought some form of advice or help in the previous 12 months because of concerns about their child’s mental health or behaviour. The majority of these (76 per cent overall) had approached a professional source, most commonly a teacher (60 per cent). Substantial minorities had contacted, or been referred to, a specialist, 28 per cent had contacted a mental health specialist and 24 per cent a special educational service such as an educational psychologist. A third (32 per cent) had approached their GP or a practice nurse and a similar proportion (34 per cent) had talked to family members or friends. Children with unsocialised or socialised conduct disorders were more likely than those with oppositional defiant disorder to have sought help with their child’s health or behavioural problems, 90 per cent and 87 per cent compared with 74 per cent. This difference was evident for both professional and informal sources. It may reflect the younger age profile of children with oppositional defiant disorder but further analysis showed that the variation was present for both children aged 5–10 and these aged 11–16. (Table 6.11). Parents who had mentioned a problem with their child’s emotions, attention or behaviour during the course of the interview and who had not seen a specialist were asked whether there was anything that had stopped them seeking such help. Fewer than a half (45 per cent) of the parents of children with conduct disorders mentioned any of the barriers prompted by the interviewer. The most common obstacles mentioned were lack of awareness of the service available (14 per cent), difficulty in getting a referral (14 per cent) and a belief that a specialist would be of no help (10 per cent). Similar barriers were mentioned by parents of children with emotional disorders although, again, the numbers with problems were quite small. (Table not shown)
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Services for Children and Young People with Mental Health Needs. Lancashire s Local Offer. Lancashire s Health Services

Services for Children and Young People with Mental Health Needs. Lancashire s Local Offer. Lancashire s Health Services

1. Name of the service and what the service provides Lancashire Care NHS Foundation Trust - Child & Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) – Community Services Lancashire Care Foundation Trust Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) Tier 3 provide a service for children and young people aged 5-16 who have a range of emotional and behavioural difficulties. The service supports and promotes emotional health and wellbeing.

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