Top PDF Class 3 Nso 3 Year e Book Level 2 14 2

Class 3 Nso 3 Year e Book Level 2 14 2

Class 3 Nso 3 Year e Book Level 2 14 2

All disputes subject to Delhi jurisdiction only. Disclaimer : The information in this book is to give you the path to success but it does not guarantee 100% success as the strategy is completely dependent on its execution. And it is based on last years papers of NSO exam. Published by : MTG Learning Media (P) Ltd.

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Class 10 Imo 3 Year e Book Level 2 13

Class 10 Imo 3 Year e Book Level 2 13

if the password for Batch i was – 'rate go long top we let have', which batch will have the password–'go rate top long have let we'? (a) II (B) III (c) IV (D) V 9. N ranks fifth in a class. S is eighth from the last. If T is sixth after N and just in the middle of N and S, then how many students are there in the class?

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Class 5 Imo 3 Year e Book Level 2 13

Class 5 Imo 3 Year e Book Level 2 13

10. Standing on a platform, Amit told Sonia that Delhi was more than 10 km but less than 15 km from there. Sonia knew that it was more than 12 km but less than 14 km. if both of them were correct, which of the following could be the distance of Delhi from there?

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Class 4 Imo 3 Year e Book Level 2 13

Class 4 Imo 3 Year e Book Level 2 13

2 times around a rectangular field that measured 25 m by 12 m. What is the total distance he jogged? A. 323 m B. 333 m C. 433 m D. 443 m 27. garima went to movie with her two friends. She gave ` 1000 to counter for movie tickets, 1 bucket of popcorn and 3 pepsi cans, what information is needed to find the amount she will get back?

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Class 3 Nso 4 Year e Book Level 2 16

Class 3 Nso 4 Year e Book Level 2 16

7 18 th NSO | Class-3 | Level 2 | ACHIEVERS SECTION 29. The table given below shows the amount of water used by four different families in January, February, March and April. All four families watched a 'Water Conservation (Save Water) Programme' in March. Which family is likely to have understood the objective of conservation of water?

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Class 10 Nso 3 Year e Book Level 2 14

Class 10 Nso 3 Year e Book Level 2 14

(A) Hydrangea (B) Petunia (C) Geranium (D) All of these 29. Study the given table carefully. Substances Blue litmus solution Phenolphthalein Methyl orange China rose indicator 1. Wasp's sting Red Colourless Red Red 2. Lime water No change Pink Yellow Green 3. Spinach No change Pink Yellow Green 4. Window cleaner Red Colourless Red Red 5. Curd Red Colourless Red Red Which of them shows the incorrect change in the colour of indicators?

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Class 9 Imo 3 Year e Book Level 2 13

Class 9 Imo 3 Year e Book Level 2 13

(a) 4500 (B) 4600 (c) 4680 (D) 4710 50. Kamla has a triangular field with sides 240 m, 200 m, 360 m, where she grew wheat. In another triangular field with sides 240 m, 320 m, 400 m adjacent to the previous field, she wanted to grow potatoes and onions. She divided the field in two parts by joining the mid-point of the longest side to the opposite vertex and grew potatoes in one part and onions in the other part. How much area (in hectares) has been used for wheat, potatoes and onions?(1 hectare = 10,000 m 2 ).

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(E,E) N [3 (Bi­phenyl 2 ylimino)butan 2 yl­­idene] 2 phenyl­aniline

(E,E) N [3 (Bi­phenyl 2 ylimino)butan 2 yl­­idene] 2 phenyl­aniline

N1 0.0449 (7) 0.0577 (7) 0.0620 (8) 0.0032 (5) 0.0036 (5) −0.0031 (6) C1 0.0450 (7) 0.0529 (8) 0.0590 (8) −0.0012 (6) 0.0060 (6) −0.0063 (6) C2 0.0647 (10) 0.0702 (10) 0.0682 (10) 0.0027 (8) 0.0049 (8) 0.0078 (8) C3 0.0831 (13) 0.0817 (12) 0.0680 (11) −0.0117 (10) 0.0237 (9) 0.0057 (9) C4 0.0608 (10) 0.0759 (11) 0.0854 (12) −0.0047 (9) 0.0285 (9) −0.0047 (9) C5 0.0489 (9) 0.0618 (9) 0.0783 (11) 0.0025 (7) 0.0126 (7) −0.0076 (7) C6 0.0464 (8) 0.0481 (8) 0.0594 (8) −0.0015 (6) 0.0056 (6) −0.0090 (6) C7 0.0503 (8) 0.0545 (8) 0.0570 (8) 0.0132 (6) 0.0045 (6) −0.0080 (6) C8 0.0706 (10) 0.0619 (10) 0.0605 (10) 0.0030 (8) 0.0155 (7) −0.0056 (7) C9 0.1029 (15) 0.0716 (11) 0.0695 (11) 0.0155 (10) 0.0331 (10) 0.0031 (9) C10 0.128 (2) 0.0970 (16) 0.0586 (11) 0.0514 (15) 0.0237 (12) 0.0052 (10) C11 0.1005 (16) 0.1150 (18) 0.0631 (12) 0.0464 (15) −0.0156 (11) −0.0194 (12) C12 0.0634 (10) 0.0816 (12) 0.0721 (11) 0.0155 (9) −0.0080 (8) −0.0144 (9) C13 0.0435 (8) 0.0497 (8) 0.0573 (8) 0.0037 (6) 0.0018 (6) 0.0011 (6) C14 0.0592 (10) 0.0759 (12) 0.1026 (14) −0.0153 (9) 0.0236 (9) −0.0272 (10)
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Crystal structures of methyl (E) 3 (2 chloro­phen­yl) 2 ({2 [(E) 2 nitro­vin­yl]phen­­oxy}meth­yl)acrylate and methyl (E) 2 ({4 chloro 2 [(E) 2 nitro­vin­yl]phen­­oxy}meth­yl) 3 (2 chloro­phen­yl)acrylate

Crystal structures of methyl (E) 3 (2 chloro­phen­yl) 2 ({2 [(E) 2 nitro­vin­yl]phen­­oxy}meth­yl)acrylate and methyl (E) 2 ({4 chloro 2 [(E) 2 nitro­vin­yl]phen­­oxy}meth­yl) 3 (2 chloro­phen­yl)acrylate

The significant difference in the bond lengths O5—C11 and O5—C12, which are 1.324 (2) and 1.444 (2) A ˚ , respectively, for compound (I), and 1.328 (4) and 1.440 (4) A ˚ , respectively, for compound (II), can be attributed to a partial contribution from the O —C O + —C resonance structures of the O5— C11( O4)—C10 group (Merlino et al., 1971). This feature, commonly observed for the carboxylic ester group of substituents in various compounds gives average values of 1.340 and 1.447 A ˚ , respectively (Varghese et al., 1986).

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Year: 2015 Volume: 3 Number: 2

Year: 2015 Volume: 3 Number: 2

The Earth Science Literacy Initiative (ESLI) defined nine “Big Ideas” of Earth science that all citizens should know (2009). Following this publication, the Michigan Teacher Excellence Program (MiTEP) identified several commonly held misconceptions for each of these “Big Ideas” (Engelmann and Huntoon 2011). Based upon these “Big Ideas” and misconceptions, the pilot MLG module we present results of here considers Big Idea #2: “Earth is 4.6 billion years old” and the misconceptions that “geologic time can be described using hundreds of years” and that “rock layers are always flat” as the bases for creating a module addressing geologic time. A crucial objective of this module is to include the standard curriculum themes of relative age, the geologic column, and numerical age. Within this curriculum, the main focus is on relative age, which includes the subjects of stratigraphic principles, gaps in the rock record and fossils and correlation.
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Year: 2015 Volume: 3 Number: 2

Year: 2015 Volume: 3 Number: 2

After collecting the data from the 480 preservice STM teachers through the 29-item positively worded five-point Likert computer self-efficacy scale, both the Bartlett’s Test of Sphericity and the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO) measure of sampling adequacy were performed to examine whether the data set was appropriate for a factor analysis. The KMO is a test that compares the weight of observed correlation coefficients with the weight of partial correlation coefficients (Kalayci, 2005) and in cases where KMO is smaller than 0.50 (Tavşancil, 2002) or smaller than 0.60 (Büyüköztürk, 2002) factor analysis can no longer be resumed. The Bartlett's test of sphericity tests the hypothesis that the correlation matrix is an identity matrix and the value of Bartlett’s sphericity test gains and its significance indicate whether or not variables are inter-correlated and in cases where Bartlett’s sphericity test is above 0.05, factor analysis cannot be conducted (Şencan, 2005). In this study, t he KMO measure of sampling adequacy was high (0.799) and significant (p = 0.000). Bartlett’s Test of Sphericity was also notably high and significant (chi-square = 7210.135 with 406 degree of freedom at p = 0.000). The mean scores were above the mid-point of 3.0 for all 29 items and these ranged from 3.41 to 4.29. The standard deviations ranged from .75 to 1.31 and the skewness and kurtosis indices were within the recommended values of |3| and |10| respectively (Kline, 1998). Then an exploratory factor analysis (principal components, direct oblimin rotation with Kaiser Normalization) was applied to analyze the items and to clarify the structure of the computer self-efficacy scale. The oblique rotation was used because it allows the factors to correlate with each other. This was needed since all subscales were expected to be inter-related and together form the overall computer self-efficacy level. The analysis identified three factors with eigenvalues > 1 and these were further confirmed by the Cattel scree plot (Figure 1).
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2 [(E) 2 Hy­dr­oxy 3 meth­oxy­benzyl­­idene] N methyl­hydrazinecarbo­thio­amide

2 [(E) 2 Hy­dr­oxy 3 meth­oxy­benzyl­­idene] N methyl­hydrazinecarbo­thio­amide

Data collection: APEX2 (Bruker, 2006); cell refinement: SAINT (Bruker, 2006); data reduction: SAINT; program(s) used to solve structure: SHELXS97 (Sheldrick, 2008); program(s) used to refine structure: SHELXL97 (Sheldrick, 2008); molecular graphics: ORTEP-3 (Farrugia, 2012); software used to prepare material for publication: WinGX (Farrugia, 2012).

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Methyl (E) 2 acetyl 3 amino 2 pentenoate

Methyl (E) 2 acetyl 3 amino 2 pentenoate

O1 0.0569 (13) 0.118 (2) 0.0511 (15) −0.0050 (12) 0.0160 (13) −0.0220 (15) O2 0.0460 (12) 0.105 (2) 0.0586 (16) −0.0033 (12) 0.0041 (13) −0.0246 (14) O3 0.0556 (13) 0.126 (2) 0.0547 (15) 0.0022 (15) 0.0120 (11) 0.0308 (15) N1 0.0440 (15) 0.114 (2) 0.0456 (19) −0.0007 (16) −0.0024 (13) 0.0214 (18) C1 0.0500 (18) 0.052 (2) 0.0325 (17) −0.0022 (15) 0.0016 (15) −0.0011 (17) C2 0.0437 (16) 0.050 (2) 0.0279 (16) 0.0013 (14) 0.0019 (14) 0.0012 (17) C3 0.0469 (17) 0.058 (2) 0.0413 (19) 0.0021 (18) −0.0046 (18) −0.0036 (16) C4 0.045 (2) 0.136 (4) 0.101 (3) −0.007 (2) −0.0074 (19) −0.027 (3) C5 0.0592 (19) 0.058 (2) 0.039 (2) 0.0067 (17) 0.0050 (16) −0.0019 (18) C6 0.078 (2) 0.077 (2) 0.0412 (18) 0.0095 (19) −0.0014 (18) 0.013 (2) C7 0.0565 (17) 0.0484 (17) 0.045 (2) −0.0012 (15) 0.0023 (16) 0.0079 (19) C8 0.091 (2) 0.070 (2) 0.040 (2) −0.001 (2) 0.0037 (17) 0.0063 (18)
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1-2-3-magic book cheat sheet

1-2-3-magic book cheat sheet

emotional. The consequence for getting a “3” could also be a time out alternative such as emotional. The consequence for getting a “3” could also be a time out alternative such as the loss of a privilege, a fine from allowance or token economy, small or large chore, the loss of a privilege, a fine from allowance or token economy, small or large chore, earlier bed time, no desert, cannot see a friend, etc. You can choose for the

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Year: 2014 Volume: 2 Number: 3

Year: 2014 Volume: 2 Number: 3

The qualitative data has shown that subjects 1 and 3 had fewer problems than participants 2 and 4. This is probably because the former were higher performers in their respective sections. Participants 2 and 4 had problems with conceptions and solving complex problems. The interviews have shown that participants from both the treatment and control groups used similar reasoning. They have also shown that differences emerged due to varying abilities not due to treatment versus control teaching strategies. This is not surprising because we believe that both the guided inquiry and EGPS are active approaches to solving problems. This likely enables them have similar influence on students’ performance. Furthermore, the data showed that students in the treatment section were more organized than the control group. This is expected because an explicit approach to problem solving encourages this organization. VanLehn et al. (2004) reached the same conclusion when they observed that their treatment group students were more organized than the control group. They acknowledged that students will solve problems depending on the focus of instructional technique.
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Year: 2015 Volume: 3 Number: 2

Year: 2015 Volume: 3 Number: 2

Discussions that have been ongoing for years on the effects of media devices on learning (Clark, 1983; Kozma, 1991; Lim, 2011) have now gained a new dimension with the educational use of IWBs. The British Educational Communications and Technology Agency (BECTA) (as cited in Hall & Higgins, 2005, p. 104) provides a clear outline of what an IWB is: “An interactive whiteboard is a large, touch-sensitive board which is connected to a digital projector and a computer. The projector displays the image from the computer screen on the board. The computer can then be controlled by touching the board, either directly or with a special pen”. In new generation IWBs, however, the surface of the board is scanned via electronic eyes and every touch of the hand on the board is precisely detected. Thus, the board functions virtually like a tablet PC or a touchpad computer. The interactive nature of the screen of the board provides the student and the teacher an opportunity to interfere with the tasks carried out on the board and thus gives a chance to make changes during the class and provides the feature of saving these changes (Erduran & Tataroğlu, 2009).
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Year: 2014 Volume: 2 Number: 3

Year: 2014 Volume: 2 Number: 3

Many mathematics education researchers have different perspectives on how the achievement gap should be framed and discussed (Gutierrez, 2008; Gutierrez & Dixon-Roman, 2011; Lubienski, 2008; Martin, 2009b; Stinson, 2010). Lubienski calls for mathematics education researchers to focus on analyses of the achievement gap (instead of the actual gap itself) and move toward analyses that are more skilled and nuanced. While Gutierrez (2008) also advocates for continued analysis of the achievement gap, she also calls for the mathematics education research community to “focus on advancement, excellence and gains in marginalized communities” (p. 362). Stinson (2010) argues that the overreliance on the achievement gap analyses in mathematics education research continues to reify White male students as the norm and math as a White male domain. Martin (2009b) provides a counterargument to the focus on the achievement gap, which creates a racial hierarchy of mathematics ability, one that frames Black students as inferior, mathematically illiterate, and less- than-ideal math learners. When White students do not perform at the level of Asian students, there is no discussion of an achievement gap. Instead, their poor performance is often explained as a problem with teacher knowledge and curriculum issues (Martin, 2009b).
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Year: 2014 Volume: 2 Number: 3

Year: 2014 Volume: 2 Number: 3

In Germany, the national biology education standards (KMK 2004) specify that learners are expected to be able to form hypotheses, plan experiments and analyze data. These competences are theoretically grounded in the SDDS-Model (Scientific Discovery as Dual Search) by David Klahr (2000). Biology teachers need to be able to support students in acquiring these competences, for example by following the recommendation that instruction mirror the phases that can be observed when scientists engage in scientific inquiry. Anderson states: “It is implied that inquiry learning should reflect the nature of scientific inquiry” (2002, p. 2). This recommendation can also be found in an important document issued at the beginning of a large national project for increasing the quality of science and mathematics education in Germany (Bund-Länder Kommission 1997).
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Year: 2014 Volume: 2 Number: 3

Year: 2014 Volume: 2 Number: 3

What the literature lacks is data about how the awe experience leads to learning re this study is important in order to examine such a connection between experience in nature, emotion and resulting learning. In addition to being asked about whether learning took place in the follow-up interview 43 participants were asked to describe evidence of learning. This question garnered information about how the awe experience led to learning and of note, the participants equated this with action or behaviors as a result of the learning. All but two participants were able to give evidence of their learning (those two, however, gave evidence for a change in conservation behavior rather than increased learning---which could be considered learning.). The evidence consisted of motivation to learn and to research topics online as well as to “spend more time out-of-doors learning,” in addition to a desire to “teach others” what they had learned. Themes pertaining to research question three were extracted from the interviews are as follows; 37% researched media, 33% studied and/or monitored nature, 21% chose to teach others, 14% pursued a career in the field and 12% worked for or volunteered in a nature group. Results are summarized in Tables 4 and 5. Some overlap occurred.
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Year: 2015 Volume: 3 Number: 2

Year: 2015 Volume: 3 Number: 2

This study was done in a period when there are attempts to develop a framework for the sustainable development and sustainable education in order to emphasize the universal significance of biodiversity, sustainable development, and sustainable education. The research reported here is a case study carried out in the spring semester of 2012-2013 academic year. The participants of the study were student teachers enrolled in a general biology course in a preservice science teacher education program at a major research university in central Turkey. The study was designed as a qualitative study and the data of the study were collected through semi- structured interviews and observation forms. The aim of the study was to develop teaching materials about the sustainable education and the sustainability of biodiversity. In parallel to this aim, an experiment of frog breeding was designed and the experiment was carried out by the participants under the supervision of the author. More specifically, the participants were involved in feeding the frogs and cleaning the aquarium. They recorded their observations together with the author. The whole process was shared in the biology course. In short, the participants observed how larvas come out from frog spawn that were put in the aquarium and how larvas became adult frogs. Adult frogs were transferred to the nearest creek after the completion of the observations. At the end of the process the attitudes of the participants towards living beings changed positively as their reports indicated.
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