Top PDF Climate Change Curriculum Development

Climate Change Curriculum Development

Climate Change Curriculum Development

Taking early action on a 2014 decree by the Vietnam Ministry of Education in capacity building on climate change in the education sector, Da Lat University introduced a mandatory course, ‘Introduction to Climate Change’, to more than 8,000 students in 2015 with great success.

8 Read more

A Systems Approach to Modelling the Effects of Climate Change on Agroforestry: A Case Study in Western Tanzania

A Systems Approach to Modelling the Effects of Climate Change on Agroforestry: A Case Study in Western Tanzania

Climate change is anticipated to have significant effects on agricultural production in sub-Saharan Africa as the mean temperature could increase by 2 ºC to 4ºC by the end of the century. Smallholder farmers in western Tanzania are vulnerable to climate change impact as agricultural production is dependent on precipitation for irrigation. It is prudent to evaluate different modes of agricultural adaptations, such as agroforestry, that these farmers can easily adopt to improve their resiliency to the effects of climate change. System dynamics modelling is a cost-effective tool to simulate the long-term behaviour of agroforestry systems for a range of future climate conditions. Water, Nutrient, and Light Capture in Agroforestry Systems (WaNuLCAS) is a system dynamics model developed by the World Agroforestry Centre that was selected to investigate long-term bio- physical interactions of maize and Acacia trees. This model was calibrated to data from field research on rotational woodlots conducted in Tabora, Tanzania from 1996 to 2002 by the World Agroforestry Centre. Several experimental simulations were selected to demonstrate the potential of the system dynamics simulations for development project planning and management.
Show more

169 Read more

CLIMATE CHANGE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT –  AS EXPERIENCE IN THE STUDY COURSES

CLIMATE CHANGE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT – AS EXPERIENCE IN THE STUDY COURSES

For teaching Sustainable development and climate change it is of vital importance to apply different methods in order the students would not only acquire theoretical knowledge, but also strengthen their confidence about environmentally friendly lifestyle and eco-efficiency principles in business, as well as encourage active involvement in sustainable development processes. This paper provides not only theoretical insight on the problem, but also gives an example of Latvian case in the field of waste management. The authors of the article sharing her teaching and researcher experience and present conclusions and practical samples for perfecting one’s knowledge and hope that this experience will be of use for they colleagues and will be grateful for any discussion, criticism and contributions to the topic under discussion.
Show more

8 Read more

Climate Change and Its Impact on Sustainable Development in Bangladesh

Climate Change and Its Impact on Sustainable Development in Bangladesh

(2007), an increase in the average global temperature will lead to changes in precipitation and atmospheric moisture due to the changes in atmospheric circulation and increases in evaporation and water vapor. Expected population growth and migration mean that urban expansion will be the most universal development challenge. Rapid urbanization and climate change have given it a new sense of urgency. When urban expansion can take the form of urban sprawl then it is costly, wasteful, and ecologically destructive [2]. By 2050, the urban population of the developing world will be 5.3 billion; Asia will host 63% of the world’s urban population, or 3.3 billion people and The United Nation predicts that here will be millions of environmental migrants by 2020, and climate change is one of the major drivers. Climate change is taking measure not only on the ecology of nations around the world but also their political, economic and social stability with the poorest nations and the poorest of the rich nations being the worst sufferers [8]. A one meter rise in sea level could for instance flood 17% of Bangladesh's land area and that could threaten large parts of coastal cities such as Lagos, Cape Town, small island Maldives. A World Bank study has estimated that a one-meter sea-level rise would affect 84 developing countries alone. Recent studies have found that up to 12% of the world GDP is already at risk from existing climate patterns. For example the value of GDP exposed to tropical cyclones alone more than tripled from US$526 billion in the 1970s to US$1.6 trillion in the first decade of the 2000s [9]. Ultimately if climate change is not being solved, then poverty eradication, food security and other major related problem cannot be solved either [10]. Secretary-General of UN, Ban Ki-moon affirmed that climate change was an "unholy brew" that could create perilous security vacuums, and that we must address a clear danger that not only exacerbated the threats but was itself a threat to international peace and security [9].
Show more

6 Read more

Future makers or future takers? A scenario analysis of climate change and the Great Barrier Reef

Future makers or future takers? A scenario analysis of climate change and the Great Barrier Reef

The extent to which nations and regions can actively shape the future or must passively respond to global forces is a topic of relevance to current discourses on climate change. In Australia, climate change has been identified as the greatest threat to the ecological resilience of the Great Barrier Reef, but is exacerbated by regional and local pressures. We undertook a scenario analysis to explore how two key uncertainties may influence these threats and their impact on the Great Barrier Reef and adjacent catchments in 2100: whether (1) global development and (2) Australian development is defined and pursued primarily in terms of economic growth or broader concepts of human well-being and environmental sustainability, and in turn, how climate change is managed and mitigated. We compared the implications of four scenarios for marine and terrestrial ecosystem services and human well-being. The results suggest that while regional actions can partially offset global inaction on climate change until about mid-century, there are probable threshold levels for marine ecosystems, beyond which the Great Barrier Reef will become a fundamentally different system by 2100 if climate change is not curtailed. Management that can respond to pressures at both global and regional scales will be needed to maintain the full range of ecosystem services. Modest improvements in human well-being appear possible even while ecosystem services decline, but only where regional management is strong. The future of the region depends largely on whether national and regional decision-makers choose to be active future ‘makers’ or passive future ‘takers’ in responding to global drivers of change. We conclude by discussing potential avenues for using these scenarios further with the Great Barrier Reef region’s stakeholders. ß 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Show more

18 Read more

HUMAN DIMENSION OF DEVELOPMENT AND CLIMATE CHANGE: NEEDS NEW MODEL OF DEVELOPMENT

HUMAN DIMENSION OF DEVELOPMENT AND CLIMATE CHANGE: NEEDS NEW MODEL OF DEVELOPMENT

It is emphatically recommended that the people whose names are not in the category of PAP because of the fact that they are living just one meter from the demarcated line or living at even less than one meter line, must be included in the category of PAP and all benefits must be given to them which are being given to displaced and should be included in the category of displaced or PAP. It is not the only case where such types of deprivations are being faced by the natives but the situation is almost alike in all development projects in India as well as in the world. Right from the inception of project, from planning phase to execution and afterward, native have never consulted and listened to their problems neither by executing agencies nor by the state/central government. They should be included in the process of rehabilitation so that they can feel that they are also citizen of India, because in the developmental process they have been excluded. On the basis of recommendations of many studies conducted worldwide in different socio-geographical and culture setting, including WCD studies, the concerns of the native must be listened and taken care of and to resolve/mitigate the situation, post-traumatic centre must be opened where people facing the trauma can be treated. At policy level, their concerns must be listened and resolved by visiting the local sites where such types of developmental activities have been either proposed or executed.
Show more

25 Read more

Effects of Climate Change on Social Infrastructure in a Developing Nation : The Nigeria Perspective Edo Oga Ojoko 1* , Halimat Omuya Abubakar 2, Adams Ndalai Baba3 , Oga Ojoko 4

Effects of Climate Change on Social Infrastructure in a Developing Nation : The Nigeria Perspective Edo Oga Ojoko 1* , Halimat Omuya Abubakar 2, Adams Ndalai Baba3 , Oga Ojoko 4

Therefore, Goal 9 aims to ensure the development of quality, reliable and sustainable social infrastructure for growth and development. This will foster trans- border trade and catalyze human and capital development globally. Furthermore, Goal 9 is intended to promote sustainable industrialization, increase access to finance, R&D innovations, efficient resource utilization, and environmentally sustainable practices for growth and development by the year 2030. According to the World Bank, LDCs like Nigeria can achieve this by investing in four key areas like agriculture and land use, oil and gas, power, and transport sectors. This will ensure the sustainable action towards low carbon development (LCD), reduced GHG emissions and climate change mitigation as presented in Figure 3. [12].
Show more

8 Read more

Agricultural Adaptation Options against Adverse Effect of Climate Change in Shyamnagar Upazila in the Satkhira District, Bangladesh

Agricultural Adaptation Options against Adverse Effect of Climate Change in Shyamnagar Upazila in the Satkhira District, Bangladesh

Different adaptation measures have been undertaken in the coastal areas of Bangladesh for decades in response to or in anticipation of the detrimental impacts of climate variability or climate change on agriculture. Cultivation of different stress tolerant, hybrid and short duration crop varieties, improvement in agricultural management (crop rotation, sorjan method, crop diversification, mini pond) infrastructural development, disaster preparedness and rehabilitation, and awareness building have been mentioned as potential adaptation options in coastal Bangladesh. Some of these options have already been practiced at local level in a small scale which can be expanded with proper knowledge dissemination, community participation and coordination between different governmental and non-governmental organizations. A number of policy, framework and legislation have also been developed regarding agricultural adaptations in the coastal region of Bangladesh. But very few systematic studies have been performed on the evidence of adaptation practices in this country and their performance in successfully adapting to climate change [12]. So the objectives of the research work were (i) to study the characteristics of climatic hazards in the study area and (ii) to study the perceived adaptability of different agricultural adaptation options against adverse effect of climate change in Shyamnagar Upazila.
Show more

12 Read more

Climate Change and Global Warming: A Threat to Sustainable Development

Climate Change and Global Warming: A Threat to Sustainable Development

Therefore, today we dumped another 70 million tons of global warming pollution into the thin shell of atmosphere surrounding our planet, as if it were an open sewer. And tomorrow we will dump a slightly larger amount, with the cumulative concentration now trapping more heat from the sun. As a result, the earth has a fever. and the fever is rising. The experts have told us it is not a passing affliction that will heal by itself. We are asked for a second opinion, and a third and a fourth opinion. And the consistent conclusion, restated with increasing alarm, is that something basic is wrong. All across the world, in every kind of environment and region known to man, increasingly dangerous weather patterns and devastating storms are abruptly putting an end to the long running debate over whether or not climate change is real. Nevertheless its effects are giving rise to a frighteningly new global phenomenon: the man-made natural disaster. 2
Show more

6 Read more

Climate Change and Development: Trade Opportunities of Climate Smart Goods and Technologies in Asia

Climate Change and Development: Trade Opportunities of Climate Smart Goods and Technologies in Asia

on environment. Environmental services are provided by eco systems or human activities to address environmental problems and help to minimize the environmental damages and protect the bio-sphere of the earth. EGS can be also classified as environmental goods comprising of pollution management products, cleaner technologies and products, resource management products and environmentally preferable products. EGS also has environmental services comprising of sewage services, refuse services, sanitation and similar services and others. The EGS were first discussed as part of the liberalizing agenda 3 in the DOHA round of the multilateral trading round in 2001. The countries had wanted the tariff and non-tariff barriers to go down for trade of such EGS as this may lead to adoption of cleaner and cost effective technologies by firms and country at large and possibly mitigate climate change and improve energy efficiency. The CSGT (a subset of EGS) were discussed at the multilateral forums as countries wanted a smaller list to liberalize and where in negotiations could be easier done than concentrating on the entire list of environmental goods 4 .
Show more

19 Read more

A scenario analysis of climate change and ecosystem services for the Great Barrier Reef.

A scenario analysis of climate change and ecosystem services for the Great Barrier Reef.

Futurist Doug Cocks invoked a fundamental choice for Australia: Would it be a future ‘ maker ’ or a future ‘ taker ’ ? (Cocks, 1999). Cocks developed five big-picture scenarios for the country, three of which he considered positive pathways that could all realistically achieve the goal of high quality of life for most present and future Australians, without abandon­ ing the current democratic, capitalist society with a mixed economy. One way to do this is ‘ going for growth ’ , whereby very high per capita income will create the money needed to protect the environment and to eliminate poverty. An alter­ native pathway is ‘ conservative development ’ , which embraces interventionist industry policies derived from ‘ new growth ’ thinking and faith in the capacity of government to contribute strongly to solving the problems of low economic growth, unacceptable levels of life opportunities, and poor environ­ mental quality through a tax-and-spend strategy. ‘ Post­ materialism ’ , by contrast, involves a change in the deep struc­ ture of society, via the distribution and use of decision-making power in organizations, institutions, and social groupings. New regional governments would increasingly edge out state governments, and worker ownership and industrial democracy would ensure corporate social responsibility. However, two less desirable pathways could also unfold: ‘ struggling to cope ’ describes what happens when a complex, path-dependent society such as Australia encounters multiple crises in a short duration of time. In ‘ muddling down ’ , quality of life declines slowly at the hands of reactive governments which act only in response to extreme political pressure, or gridlocked govern­ ments which are hostages to major interest groups.
Show more

22 Read more

Second Quarter Results 2014 Investor presentation

Second Quarter Results 2014 Investor presentation

Important factors that may cause such a difference for Nordea include, but are not limited to: (i) the macroeconomic development, (ii) change in the competitive climate, (iii) change in the regulatory environment and other government actions and (iv) change in interest rate and foreign exchange rate levels.

23 Read more

UNCDF: Supporting Local Finance Solutions for Climate Change

UNCDF: Supporting Local Finance Solutions for Climate Change

UNCDF is the UN’s capital investment agency for the world’s 48 Least Developed Countries (LDCs). With its capital mandate and instruments, UNCDF offers “last mile” finance models that unlock public and private resources, especially at the domestic level, to reduce poverty and support local economic devel- opment. This last mile is where available resources for development are scarcest; where market failures are most pronounced; and where benefits from national growth tend to leave people excluded. Through these financing models, public resources lay the groundwork for private investment. UNCDF financing models are applied in thematic areas where addressing barriers to finance at the local level can have a transformational effect for poor and excluded people and communities. UNCDF’s financing models work through two channels: savings-led financial inclusion that expands the oppor- tunities for individuals, households, and small busi- nesses to participate in the local economy, providing them with the tools they need to climb out of poverty and manage their financial lives; and by showing how localized investments—through fiscal decentralization, innovative municipal finance, and structured project finance—can drive public and private funding that underpins local economic expansion and sustainable development.
Show more

11 Read more

CLIMATE CHANGE – “A POTENTIAL THREAT TO HUMAN HEALTH”

CLIMATE CHANGE – “A POTENTIAL THREAT TO HUMAN HEALTH”

Climate changes have a strong impact on human health changes in climate affect the average weather conditions. There are three projected physical consequences of climate change, temperature rise, see level rise and extremes in the hydrological cycle. The present article reviews the health consequences of human – induced climate change on sustainable development, particularly the potential impact of such change on food supply, natural disasters, infectious diseases and ecosystems. A variety of direct, indirect and systemically mediated health effects have been identified.
Show more

6 Read more

The Road to Copenhagen 2009   The European Union and Climate Change Action  EU Centre, Singapore Background Brief No  1, 10 November 2009

The Road to Copenhagen 2009 - The European Union and Climate Change Action. EU Centre, Singapore Background Brief No. 1, 10 November 2009

within the Union. According to the package, the EU is now committed to cutting overall greenhouse gas emissions to at least 20% below 1990 levels by 2020, a commitment that will rise to 30% if other industrialised countries agree to do the same. To achieve this level of reduction, other targets have been set: to boost energy efficiency by 20% by 2020, to increase the share of renewable energy in energy consumption to an average of 20% by 2020 across the EU, and to derive 10% of transport fuels from sustainably- produced biofuels by 2020. “The package also seeks to promote the development and safe use of carbon capture and storage, a suite of technologies that allows the carbon dioxide emitted by industrial processes to be captured and stored, for example, underground (and ocean sinks perhaps) where it cannot contribute to global warming.” 16 The package also further strengthens the ETS to cover all major industrial emitters and introduces more auctioning. In sectors not covered by the ETS – such as buildings, transport, agriculture and waste – emissions are to be reduced by 10% below 2005 levels by 2020. Other measures boost carbon capture and storage technologies, and cut CO 2 from cars by introducing tighter fuel quality standards.
Show more

20 Read more

The Promise of an Energy Tracker Curriculum for Promoting Home-School Connections and Youth Agency in Climate Action

The Promise of an Energy Tracker Curriculum for Promoting Home-School Connections and Youth Agency in Climate Action

The results of this study align with previous work that highlights the resonance between energy action and economic benefit. This relationship between behavior and economic incentive is not new—Winett, Kagel, Battalio & Winkler’s 1978 study examined a group of homeowners who reduced their electrical consumption by 7.6%-12% when provided with a financial incentive (Winett, Kagel, Battalio, and Winkler, 1978). It is unsurprising that individuals are more willing to act on climate change if they see monetary benefits rather than seeing mitigation practices as losing something (i.e. heating, driving, etc.). A question then arises as to whether behavior changes will persist if or when the incentive is removed. The students in this study claimed they would continue their new practices, but long-term changes in behaviors are notoriously difficult to achieve (Abrahamese et. al, 2005). More work would be needed to understand what supports, if any, are needed to sustain the practices students began in this curriculum.
Show more

15 Read more

Climate change and economic growth: issues challenges and mitigation

Climate change and economic growth: issues challenges and mitigation

An important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere and the second most important in terms of anthropogenic emissions is methane. In comparison to CO2, relatively little work has been done on CH4. Stern and Kaufmann (1996) used available data to reconstruct the first time series of historic emissions from 1860-1993. They found that anthropogenic emissions had increased from 80 million tonnes of carbon in 1860 to 380 million in 1990. The relative importance of the various emissions sources changed over time, though rice farming and livestock husbandry remained the two most important sources. Stern (2007) described the climate change as “the biggest externality the world has ever seen” because the negative impacts from any person’s or firm’s greenhouse gas emissions are spread across the globe and over a long period of time. The release of green house gas is the outcome of economic production of goods and services. According to Barrett (1990) pollution externalities create coordination problems between countries, because from the perspective of a nation states, there are strong incentives for free-riding on other nations’ mitigation efforts. There are also important questions about how the global mitigation effort should be distributed between nations in terms of burden sharing” or “effort sharing” and how reductions in emissions can be reconciled with economic development especially in the poorer nations.
Show more

9 Read more

Queensland Teachers’ Understandings of Education for Climate Change

Queensland Teachers’ Understandings of Education for Climate Change

Teachers approach curriculum with complex experiences, ideas, beliefs, and values that shape the way they interpret and respond to curriculum documents. In the context of national and state curriculum frameworks and policies supporting education for sustainability (EfS), it is important to examine the role and influence of teachers’ beliefs about climate change and pedagogy on climate change education practices within their school classrooms. This paper examines teachers’ personal and professional beliefs about climate change and climate change education. Survey data from over 300 Queensland primary and secondary teachers were first analysed to identify teachers’ understandings and beliefs relating to the realities, causes, and consequences of climate change. Next, the data were analysed to illuminate how teachers conceptualise climate change education in terms of content and processes. This research is part of a larger PhD research project investigating teacher beliefs and climate change education.
Show more

7 Read more

Annual Report 2007

Annual Report 2007

such as the National Anti-Poverty Strategy, the National Climate Change Strategy, the National Spatial Strategy and the National Biodiversity Plan. As part of its new work programme for the period 2006 to 2008, Comhar SDC will prepare recommendations on the review and update of the NSDS. This is timely for a number of reasons; if a five-year review cycle is adhered to, an updated NSDS could be expected in 2007. The EU is committed to review its own sustainable development strategy (EU SDS) by mid 2006 and will take account of the need to strengthen links and promote greater coherence with national strategies. It is also timely because the next National Development Plan (2007-) will establish medium term priorities for infrastructure and other investment; it is crucial that this portfolio be consistent with a the tenets of sustainable development.
Show more

40 Read more

Climate change: effects on agricultural growth and rural  transformation in Nigeria

Climate change: effects on agricultural growth and rural transformation in Nigeria

Hence, the word ‘rural’ means agriculture and other occupations such as trades and crafts carried on in the rural areas. In addition, Yusuf and Ukoje, (2010) observed that rural areas are the non-urbanised places where the dominant livelihood activities are agriculture. In their conception, agriculture is not considered synonymous with rural areas but rather a reflection of the fact that agriculture is most peculiar to rural life in Nigeria. Subscribing to the foregoing, Steve and Proctor (2001) stated that there is no exact definition of the term ‘rural’, but that rural areas are ‘clearly reconisable’.They constitute the space where human settlement and infrastructure occupy only small patches of the landscape, most of which is dominated by fields and pastures,woods and forests, water, mountains and deserts .Likewise, International Fund For Agricultural Development (IFAD)(2001) added that rural people usually live in farmsteads or settlements of 5-10,000 persons, but also makes the point that ‘national distnctions between rural and urban are arbitrary and varied.Besides, Alinno et al.,(2012) opined that the term rural has been technically taken to signify any area of underdevelopment, poverty and thin population whereas Umebali and Akubuilo (2006) itemised the key features of a rural community to consist of:
Show more

8 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...