Top PDF College Health and Mental Health Outcomes on Student Success

College Health and Mental Health Outcomes on Student Success

College Health and Mental Health Outcomes on Student Success

University Students and Families There currently still exists a stigma that those who suffer mental health challenges or seek out psychotherapeutic treatment are socially undesirable or unacceptable. Those who reach out for help are more likely to be viewed as emotional unstable or dangerous compared to those that never received treatment. In order to avoid being labeled as “crazy,” people are willing to deny themselves the necessary treatment (Vogel, Wade, & Hackler, 2007). However, there are positive changes that are taking please, at least when it comes to the college student population and their help-seeking behaviors. Currently, the trend is that students are seeking out mental health services at a continuously increasing rate. The stigma surrounding counseling has continued to diminish over time resulting in more learners obtaining the treatment that they need (Gallagher, 2013). The results provided from this study should encourage those behaviors and trends while supporting the growing belief in the efficacy o f psychotherapy for college students. Although there is still a stigma associated with participating in medication, the findings o f this study might encourage students to become more willing to consider medication treatment along with traditional therapy. Even while in college, parents commonly have a significant role in the development o f their children.
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The Impact Of Orientation Programming On Student Success Outcomes At A Rural Community College

The Impact Of Orientation Programming On Student Success Outcomes At A Rural Community College

acceptance, and appreciation of diversity (Cook, Cully, & Huftalin 2003). Some institutions do not take student retention seriously as they should as evidenced by an insufficient number of programs to increase it (Tinto, 1999). With an average attrition rate of 41% from first to second year and a 34% persistence-to-graduation rate, it is necessary for all postsecondary institutions to focus more on student success and effective predictors of student retention (American College Testing, 2010). Zwerling (1980) states “to reduce significantly the staggering attrition at the average community college, it appears necessary to shift our focus from what is wrong with the student to what is wrong with the institution” (p. 56). He suggests that institutional programs and services can have a profound impact on student persistence and retention. Such programs may include academic achievement recognition, academic advising, guidance counseling, and sponsoring orientation for new students. Kay McClenney identified the first term of enrollment as the critical window of time for community colleges to reduce student attrition (National On-Campus Report, 2005). Marina & McGuire (2008) suggest the moment that an individual begins to develop a relationship with a college or university is important for first year student success.
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Mental Health Literacy among College Students: Conceptualizations of Mental and Emotional Health

Mental Health Literacy among College Students: Conceptualizations of Mental and Emotional Health

Throughout the focus groups, participants made a variety of attributions to mental and emotional health, indicating a lack of understanding. Some students directly noted that mental health is not really understood because there is no concrete, singular definition for it. For example, one student noted, “…it is hard to define because mental health and emotional health isn’t always understood”. Another student stated, “…I think we all have different definitions”, indicating that definitions of mental and emotional health vary because each individual thinks about them in differing ways. Although it was evident throughout the focus groups that students had a difficult time defining mental and emotional health, when they did define it, it was often understood in relation to being balanced, academic life, and other general aspects such as affordability, a focus on psychopathology, reactivity, and levels of support.
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Understanding information resources for college student mental health: A knowledge graph approach

Understanding information resources for college student mental health: A knowledge graph approach

Specifically, Fig. 1 shows that University A provides 8 hyperlinks on its homepage, including Services, News and Posts, Crisis Text Line Website, Your online resources for college mental health, Therapy Assistance Online, About Counseling, About Test- ing, How do I make an Initial Appointment? and Live Chart. There are 6 items on its navigation menu: About Us, Services, Resource and Self-Help, Innovations in Col- lege Counseling, Calendar, and Contact. The site map also shows that there are many more pages under “Services” and “Resources and Self-Help.” The university also made efforts to present the innovations in the counseling services.
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College Coaches’ Experiences, Knowledge and Attitudes to Support Student-Athlete Mental Health

College Coaches’ Experiences, Knowledge and Attitudes to Support Student-Athlete Mental Health

identify and respond to student mental health concerns, including (1) providing students access to licensed mental health providers; (2) establishing procedures and action plans for identifying and referring student-athletes to qualified practioners; (3) pre-participation mental health screening; and (4) health-promoting environments that support mental well-being and resilience through education for student-athletes, coaches and staff (NCAA, 2016). Along with establishing a new framework for understanding and expectations for supporting student-athlete mental health, the SSI’s best practices guide effectively reshaped the job description of the college coach. Coaches were expected to uphold a new set of principles and guidelines related to student-athlete wellness to which they were not previously beholden. Now, according to the NCAA, it seems coaches should know the signs and symptoms of mental health issues, know how to foster healthy and open relationships with their athletes, have sensitive conversations with an at-risk student-athlete, talk about mental illness with their student athletes, and create a
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How Community College Instructors in Louisiana Recognize Student Mental Health Needs

How Community College Instructors in Louisiana Recognize Student Mental Health Needs

instructors at the study site. The researcher delimited the criteria for choosing participants to be a community college instructor at the study site with at least one year of teaching experience. The one-on-one semi structured interviews took place with participants who may or may not recognize mental health issue warning signs. The researcher did not include counselors who are more familiar with mental health issues or other staff such as librarians, janitorial staff, or student workers, who may see other signs often missed in the classroom environment. Also, the study only focused on two community colleges in Louisiana, which means it may not be
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Minority Student Perceptions of Mental Health

Minority Student Perceptions of Mental Health

Religion. Religion plays a large role among many minority cultures and can be related to use of mental health services (Goldston et al., 2008). Over half of African Americans identify with the Christian faith and attend church weekly (Avent, et al., 2015). They receive their support and friendship from the church and often use it as a form of release for any anxiety, depression, or mental health issues they may experience (Avent et al., 2015). The likelihood that African Americans will use religious services as their coping mechanism for mental health issues is extremely high. Avent and colleagues (2015) found that religious leaders meet with congregation members daily to discuss mental health issues. The leaders often help them through their problems in a religious aspect, but they are not against making referrals to outside sources when appropriate. The barriers that religious leaders experience are the same as noted above when trying to refer to outside sources (Avent et al., 2015; Goldston et al., 2008). For African American college students, religion is often a staple that they need in order to relieve stress and have social support. Both men and women report high reliance on the need for religious support (Cokley et al., 2013). In fact, only 4% of the participants used mental health resources that were not religiously based. However, these alternative strategies may be less effective than professional health services.
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Enhancing Support for Student Mental Health and Wellbeing through Service Renewal at a Canadian College

Enhancing Support for Student Mental Health and Wellbeing through Service Renewal at a Canadian College

Figure 4. Model of People-Centred Leadership through Praxis (PCLP). Adapted from Furman’s (2012) social justice model (p. 205) and integrating concepts presented by Fraser (2009, 2013), Fraser and Honneth (2003), and Kouzes and Posner (2017). The PCLP Model adapts Furman’s (2012) nested model approach to achieve social justice through praxis which have direct influence over the problem at hand: individual (personal), team (interpersonal), department (collective), and institution (systemic). As the dimensions expand from the individual, they broaden to represent both the unique approaches to praxis required at each level, but also the interdependence between them (Furman, 2012). In leading change to resolve the PoP, I must then build capacity within and across each of these dimensions. While PoP primarily impacts my department, these issues extend beyond our team and can have a profound influence over the ways in which others at the College approach their work and on institutional performance outcomes (e.g., student progression and graduation rates). These intersections require that change approaches at insular dimensions also consider the impact on an instritutional level. This will ensure that solutions explored throughout the chapter are aligned with, and can be easily integrated into, the College.
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A SURVEY REPORT ON MENTAL HEALTH. College Students Speak: A Survey Report on Mental Health

A SURVEY REPORT ON MENTAL HEALTH. College Students Speak: A Survey Report on Mental Health

How to communicate with students. Faculty and staff should be trained on how to express care and concern and be sympathetic, empathetic and understanding when talking about mental health issues. Faculty and staff should hear them out and be respectful, non-judgmental and sensitive to their issues. They should also address mental health in the classroom and let students know they are available to talk. Mental health conditions are real. Faculty and staff should know that mental health issues are as real and as serious as other physical health issues. They are not used as an excuse for being lazy, irresponsi- ble or a bad student. It is not a scam or a choice.
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Mental health supported accommodation services: a systematic review of mental health and psychosocial outcomes

Mental health supported accommodation services: a systematic review of mental health and psychosocial outcomes

Research on outcomes in supported accommodation for deinstitutionalised populations provided good evidence for improvement or non-deterioration in psychiatric symptoms, social functioning and rates of rehospitalisa- tion. There was limited evidence for improvement in QoL and employment. Notably, a number of studies highlighted a consistent association between more re- strictive settings and poorer outcomes, across psychi- atric, social and QoL outcomes, for this group. Although, these findings are somewhat inconsistent, the threshold of ‘success’ for this population is radically dif- ferent than for other groups. Due to the severity of clin- ical presentations and duration of institutionalised care, most researchers and clinicians consider the absence of deterioration as indicative of successful transition to community care. Indeed, one of the greatest challenges of the deinstitutionalisation process was to address the chronic psychiatric, social and behavioural difficulties of patients, while simultaneously maintaining their tenure in the community [1]. Supported accommodation ser- vices appear to have contributed to the achievement of these goals; the reported findings, while not consistently demonstrating improvements across domains do, for the most part, highlight stability.
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Mental Health Issues in College Athletes

Mental Health Issues in College Athletes

In this study, a majority (53.4%) of participants came from Division I Institutions. It was determined that the sports medicine department at the college typically employed six full-time athletic trainers and one full-time physician. Across the sample size there were approximately 100 student-athletes per athletic trainer and about 376 student- athletes per physician. Less than half of the participants in this study had a written plan for identifying student-athletes with mental health concerns. Thirty one and a half percent of institutions did not screen for any of the six mental health concerns and only 19.5% screened for all six. An important finding was that in Division II and III athletics there were fewer concerns being screened for than at the Division I level. As with many health issues, it is important to identify mental health issues early to help limit the detrimental effects that they have on the student-athlete’s athletic performance. From this study, it is the author’s recommendation that each institution should have a written plan to identify athletes with mental health concerns.
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The Crisis in College and University Mental Health

The Crisis in College and University Mental Health

These concerns have placed new pressures on college mental health services to keep campuses safe but sometimes without appropriate strategic planning. While there may be circumstances in which sharing clinical information or mandated medical leaves might be appropriate, these pressures have increased the challenge and conflict experienced by campus clinicians to keep patient care the primary goal of the clinical interaction. Lowering the threshold for communication is likely to erode the often fragile trust between a troubled student and the campus mental health systems and/or university administrators. 14 Role of psychiatry
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Facilitating Success in College for Undergraduate Students with ASD, LD, and Mental Health Diagnoses

Facilitating Success in College for Undergraduate Students with ASD, LD, and Mental Health Diagnoses

Outcomes of a 4-year Program with Higher Education and Employment Goals for Individuals Diagnosed with Mental Illness. Work: A Journal of Prevention, Assessment and Rehabilitation[r]

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College. Academic Stress and Mental Health

College. Academic Stress and Mental Health

• Over-controlling parents undermine the competence and confidence of college students and can negatively affect the parent-student relationship. Students who reported having over-controlling parents reported significantly higher levels of depression and less satisfaction with life. Furthermore, the negative effects of helicopter parenting on college students’ well-being were largely explained by the perceived violation of students’ basic psychological needs for autonomy and competence.

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College. Academic Stress and Mental Health

College. Academic Stress and Mental Health

• Over-controlling parents undermine the competence and confidence of college students and can negatively affect the parent-student relationship. Students who reported having over-controlling parents reported significantly higher levels of depression and less satisfaction with life. Furthermore, the negative effects of helicopter parenting on college students’ well-being were largely explained by the perceived violation of students’ basic psychological needs for autonomy and competence.

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Digital natives: The nature of technology on college student mental health

Digital natives: The nature of technology on college student mental health

outdoors is simply the feel-good overflow from physical activity and presence of other people often present in these situations. To parse out the effects of nature alone, the authors conducted five separate experiments, involving 537 college students in real and imagined contexts. In one experiment, participants were led on a 15-minute walk through indoor hallways or along a tree-lined river path. In another, the undergraduates viewed photographic scenes of buildings or landscapes. A third experiment required students to imagine themselves in a variety of situations both active and sedentary, inside and out, and with and without others. Two last experiments measured participants' moods and energy levels throughout the day using diary entries. Over either four days or two weeks, students recorded their exercise, social interactions, time spent outside, and exposure to natural environments, including plants and windows. Across all methodologies,
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College Student Mental Health and Use of Counseling Center Services

College Student Mental Health and Use of Counseling Center Services

other top reasons were “I can deal with my problems myself” (n = 99; 77.3%), “My problems are not serious enough” (n = 94; 73.4%), and “I believe my problems will get better in time without counseling” (n = 86; 67.2%). Several comments echoed these reasons. One student wrote, “I have experienced these things before, and I have gotten through them myself before.” Another student said, “I already receive substantial support for any of my concerns through our Christian community.” Very few students believed

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Life Adversity, Social Support, Resilience, and College Student Mental Health

Life Adversity, Social Support, Resilience, and College Student Mental Health

CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION College student mental health has become an increasing concern for higher education institutions over the past decade. The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) college student information page touts statistics that 75% of pervasive mental health conditions originate by the age of 24, 25% of college students are diagnosed or treated for mental health disorders, over 40% of students experienced more than average amounts of stress over the previous 12 months, over 80% felt overwhelmed by what they needed to accomplish, 31% of students reported feeling so depressed it was difficult to function within the past 12 months, and over 50% experienced overwhelming anxiety resulting in academic difficulties (NAMI, 2014). Rates for students seriously considering suicide within the previous 12 months were reported at 7% (NAMI, 2014). Further, it is estimated that only about 17% of adults in the United States are considered to be in a state of optimal mental health (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2011). College is thought an opportune time to provide services and interventions to students to help improve their mental health (Douce & Keeling, 2014).
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MENTAL HEALTH. Managing Student-Athletes Mental Health Issues

MENTAL HEALTH. Managing Student-Athletes Mental Health Issues

Research suggests that suicide is the second leading cause of death among col- lege students. Approximately three suicides occur daily among college students, and seven to 10 percent of college students either attempt or contemplate suicide in a given year. The increased possibility of sui- cide attempts and suicides makes depres- sion the most critical disorder discussed in this handbook. Although early identification and treatment are important for all mental disorders, they are more important for mood disorders because of the potential for self-harm. Coaches sometime want to assume that student-athletes are healthy simply because they are athletes. Coaches must remember that they are not just stu- dent-athletes. They are human beings with the same potential frailties as non-athletes. They are young people attempting to deal with all of the complexities of life, the demands of college life and the pressures that sometimes accompany athletic performance.
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Student Athletes And Mental Health: An Exploration Of Potential Hurdles To Student Success

Student Athletes And Mental Health: An Exploration Of Potential Hurdles To Student Success

The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) defined meditation as a mind and body practice that is used for increasing calmness and physical relaxation, improving psychological balance, coping with illness, and enhancing overall health and well-being. (NCCIH 2017) A meta-analysis on meditative therapies used for reducing anxiety found that meditation had some efficacy in improving the symptoms of anxiety. (Chen et. al., 2012) When students were enrolled in a 15 week meditation course that was based on Buddhist and mindfulness traditions, participants became more mindful, compassionate, and had a heightened sense of psychological well-being. (Crowley, C., & Munk, D. 2017) In that same study researchers found that practicing meditation could improve overall college student well-being through the exploration of emotional states and a process of self-actualization. (Crowley, C., & Munk, D. 2017)
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