Top PDF House of Commons: Home Affairs Committee: The work of the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse: Eleventh Report of Session 2016–17

House of Commons: Home Affairs Committee: The work of the 
Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse: Eleventh Report of Session 2016–17

House of Commons: Home Affairs Committee: The work of the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse: Eleventh Report of Session 2016–17

25. Hugh Davies QC also refers to “unattributed briefings, reportedly from those within IICSA, tending to undermine the credibility of what was disclosed”, and he refers to a Daily Telegraph article which quotes “an IICSA source”.25 It has also been reported in the media that other former counsel resigned, at least in part, because they were dissatisfied with the Inquiry’s handling of this incident.26 A recent press report suggests that IICSA’s response to the incident had “alarmed other female staff” and had prompted the resignation of Aileen McColgan, counsel to the investigations into the Anglican and Catholic churches.27 26. It is not for us to pass any comment on the allegations made in the media about the former Counsel to the Inquiry, which he has categorically denied. We are not in a position, and it is certainly not our responsibility, to assess either the facts of the case or the details of the processes that the Inquiry pursued. However, on the basis of the evidence we have seen, we do not believe that IICSA has taken seriously enough its responsibility to pursue allegations of bullying or disclosures of sexual assault within the Inquiry. Nor do we believe it has done enough to demonstrate publicly that it has a robust approach to such matters. IICSA’s public response has been inadequate, and the words attributed to an unidentified “IICSA source” in the press in response to the alleged assault are completely inappropriate, appearing to dismiss the serious nature of the matter and the credibility of the alleged victim. One of the Inquiry’s key purposes is to assess other organisations’ procedures for dealing with disclosures of sexual assault or abuses of power, and institutional reluctance to confront difficult issues that might jeopardise their reputation. We therefore believe that it is extremely important that the Inquiry can show that it treats these issues with appropriate rigour when they affect IICSA itself.
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House of Commons: Women and Equalities Committee:Sexual harassment and sexual violence in schools: Third Report of Session 2016–17 : 13 September 2016

House of Commons: Women and Equalities Committee:Sexual harassment and sexual violence in schools: Third Report of Session 2016–17 : 13 September 2016

64. In addition to these domestic and international obligations, there are also existing Government strategies within which action to prevent and reduce sexual harassment and sexual violence in schools could be taken. Prevention is one of the primary objectives of the Home Office’s Ending Violence Against Women and Girls (EVAWG) strategy.70 65. There is a linked strategy71 to tackle child sexual exploitation at the launch of which, then Prime Minister David Cameron said “We are talking about sexual abuse being a national threat recognised by the police.”72 The Department for International Development has a full programme of work, including research, evaluation and funding on preventing sexual and other violence overseas.
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House of Commons: Women and Equalities Committee: Sexual harassment and sexual violence in schools: Government response to the Committee’s Third Report of Session 2016 –17: 23 November 2016

House of Commons: Women and Equalities Committee: Sexual harassment and sexual violence in schools: Government response to the Committee’s Third Report of Session 2016 –17: 23 November 2016

5) The Government welcomes the WEC’s work and recommendations on this very important issue, and we are grateful to all those who provided evidence. The scale and impact of sexual harassment and sexual violence in schools set out by the inquiry shines a light on a worrying picture: sexual harassment and abuse of girls being accepted as part of daily life; primary school-aged children learning about sex and relationships through exposure to hard-core pornography and a prevailing culture in schools which seemingly condones sexual harassment as being “just banter”. It is clear that action is needed to make sure that all schools are equipped to respond appropriately and tackle these issues. There is cross-Government support for prioritising work to make significant progress in this area, including through the strategy addressing violence against women and girls.
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Growing up with the internet: 2nd Report of Session 2016–17

Growing up with the internet: 2nd Report of Session 2016–17

On 8 november 2016 Members of the Committee visited Richard Atkins Primary School in Brixton to observe a special assembly presented by Google. Lord Best, Lord Gilbert of Panteg, the Earl of Caithness and the Bishop of Chelmsford were in attendance. This was part of the ‘Internet Legends Tour’, an initiative which Google had developed in partnership with Parent Zone to promote online safety in schools. The information was targeted at children between 9 and 10, and was centred around four messages encouraging children: not to share personal information or images which might be embarrassing; to protect passwords; to think critically to avoid ‘phishing’ type scams; and, to respect one another online. The assembly was presented by a professional actor and with a well-made set. In a post-assembly meeting, Google told Members of the Committee that the assembly was presented in 40 schools a year. Google was intending to develop resources so that schools could present a modified version of the assembly by themselves. It had already developed lesson plans and presentation slides.
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Recruitment and retention of teachers : Fifth Report of Session 2016–17

Recruitment and retention of teachers : Fifth Report of Session 2016–17

4. During our inquiry, the National Audit Office (NAO) carried out a thorough review of teacher supply in England, Training New Teachers. It concluded that “the government needs to do more to demonstrate how new arrangements for training new teachers are improving the quality of teaching in classrooms”.6 The Public Accounts Committee subsequently carried out an inquiry and made a number of recommendations in respect of the Government’s long-term plan for teacher supply and the evidence base behind interventions.7 Both of these reports have greatly aided the progress of our own inquiry. 5. We recognise how committed teachers in England are to their profession and how dedicated they are to improving education. But we also appreciate that in recent years schools have had a lot of policy changes to manage and this has impacted on recruitment and retention. We make a number of recommendations in this report, which we hope will help to raise the status of the teaching profession to potential recruits and wider society.
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The Inquiry into Child Abuse in Ireland

The Inquiry into Child Abuse in Ireland

As stated earlier, the Commission was initially given a two year timeframe in which to complete its work. This was expected to cost in the region of €1.9 million to €2.5 million. It is now estimated that the Inquiry cost in the region of €126 million to €136 million. Some of the factors which impacted on the timescale and costs were noted earlier in this paper. (See Figure 2 in the Annexe to this paper which details the gross projected cost of the Tribunal excluding third party and discovery costs at the end of 2008 14 ).

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The House of Commons Modernisation Committee: who needs it?

The House of Commons Modernisation Committee: who needs it?

The 2002 attempt to reform the select committee system has been examined elsewhere (Kelso 2003), but the most salient point to note is that the Modernisation Committee was reluctant to recognise the need for alterations to the operation of the select committees. Formed in 1978, the select committee system was a significant step forward for parliamentary scrutiny and House of Commons effectiveness, but had nevertheless been a focus for reformers who argued that the system needs additional, perhaps even constant, revision. The Modernisation Committee only engaged with the issue after considerable attention had been brought to bear on the matter by other actors. The Liaison Committee was perhaps most vocal in its concerns, publishing a number of reports that highlighted the deficiencies of the select committee system in terms of scrutiny (HC 300, 1999–2000; HC 748, 1999–2000; HC 321 2000–01). The serious problems facing the select committees were further underlined following the rejection by backbenchers in July 2001 of the government’s attempts to remove two select committee chairs, Donald Anderson and Gwyneth Dunwoody (Kelso 2003, 58–62). It is fortuitous that criticism of the existing system came to a head just as Robin Cook was appointed Leader of the House. His arrival in the chair of the Modernisation Committee enabled a window of opportunity to open in favour of reform (Norton 2000; Kelso 2003), and the committee’s eventual proposals to reform the select committee system (HC 224, 2001–02) attempted to tackle some of the issues that were at the heart of the imbalance in executive– legislative relations, particularly those recommendations geared towards removing whip influence from select committee nominations, which had long been criticised for delimiting the scrutiny abilities of the select committees (Kelso 2003, 62–63). Given the track record of the Modernisation Committee to that point, it is likely that, without Cook in the chair, its response would have been quite different. It is not the case that other actors, such as the Liaison Committee, pre-empted the Modernisation Committee on this matter: the latter did not wish to be involved in questions of scrutiny at all, a stance reinforced under the leadership of Margaret Beckett. Without Cook leading the committee, the most radical of its recommendations would in all likelihood never have been made.
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House fo Commons Library: Briefing paper : Number 07854, 23 January 2017 : Homelessness Reduction Bill 2016-17: Report on Committee Stage

House fo Commons Library: Briefing paper : Number 07854, 23 January 2017 : Homelessness Reduction Bill 2016-17: Report on Committee Stage

On the issue of savings, of course we all hope for savings, not only cash savings but savings in human misery, bureaucracy and unnecessary action. I am, however, less sanguine than the Minister about the fact that that will all be resolved in one to two years. In part I say that because much of what the Bill will do is to encourage what we have often heard called a culture, a culture of local authorities doing more by way of prevention. Yet in a lot of the busiest authorities, prevention work is done—in 80% of cases in Camden, for example—so quite a lot is going on, and I am not persuaded that we will see an immediate culture change, or that that culture change will produce savings.
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Entitlement to free early years education
and childcare : Fourth Report of Session 2016–17 : report, together with formal minutes relating to the report : ordered by the House of Commons to be printed 8 June 2016

Entitlement to free early years education and childcare : Fourth Report of Session 2016–17 : report, together with formal minutes relating to the report : ordered by the House of Commons to be printed 8 June 2016

Neil Leitch: There is a mix, in that there are two parts. All the evidence shows that children benefit from some form of care and education. The EPPE research was categorical on that, so I do not think there is any question about that. The other part of the question is about children who are deprived or disadvantaged. Is the system sufficient to cope with them, for instance, with the 1:4 ratios? No, it is entirely not. Most providers will tell you where they are operating with two-year-olds who are entitled to the 15 hours, but it comes with—these are my words—an element of baggage. That baggage is that additional resources are required, almost one-to-one care with some children. I can tell you from personal experience, because I have seen it and I receive emails almost on a daily basis, and I am quite happy to submit them to the Committee.
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The Government’s Response to the House of Commons Home Affairs Select Committee Report:Young Black People and the Criminal Justice System

The Government’s Response to the House of Commons Home Affairs Select Committee Report:Young Black People and the Criminal Justice System

We agree. Information on charging is already available. To establish whether there is disproportionality in charging young black people, the CPS undertook an equality and diversity impact assessment of CPS statutory charging decisions in England and Wales, covering cases from September 2004 to March 2005. The report showed no significant differences across ethnic groups. A second report has been published and is available on the CPS website (see recommendation 51). This is based on a full year’s data from April 2005 to March 2006. This report has a wider remit and includes the gender, ethnicity and age of the suspect. The quality of the data on disposals as part of the Section 95 statistics needs significant improvement. The current work underway to develop and implement the new MDS will seek to rectify this, and the collection of charging data.
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2016 Federal Budget. Submission. on the. to the. House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance. by the

2016 Federal Budget. Submission. on the. to the. House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance. by the

The Canadian life and health insurance industry plays a key role in Canada's economy. It protects over 75% of Canadians through a wide variety of life and health insurance and annuity products. The industry paid over $83 billion in benefits in 2014 or more than $1.6 billion a week, with over 90% paid to living policyholders. Almost 155,000 Canadians earn some or all of their income directly from the industry (as employees or independent agents). The industry is a major investor in Canada with more than $721 billion in assets, nearly 90% of which comprise long-term investments, an important source of long-term capital for the federal and provincial governments and businesses. Canadian life insurers contributed over $1 billion in corporate, capital, sales and other taxes to the federal government for the 2014 calendar year. Canada's life insurers have a longstanding record of operating in international markets, with almost $62 billion (or 41%) of their worldwide premiums coming from outside Canada. In this submission, we recommend the following five initiatives that align with the Government's key priorities for the 2016 budget:
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Inquiry into Business-University Collaboration by the House of Commons Select Committee on Business, Innovation & Skills

Inquiry into Business-University Collaboration by the House of Commons Select Committee on Business, Innovation & Skills

• IDEALondon, is a collaborative project based in London's Tech City and launched by the Prime Minister in 2013. It is a unique partnership between UCL, Cisco and DC Thompson to support the growth of rapidly expanding digital, tech and media start- ups in and around east London. The partnership provides bespoke support, tailored to individual start-ups, with mentoring and a strategic acceleration programme. It will initially house around fifteen companies and around one hundred entrepreneurs and staff. It provides a new model of working between universities, large and medium size organisations for the benefit of small business development.
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Labor and Workplace Standards Committee. House of Representatives State of Washington. Final Report for 2016 (Regular and Special Session)

Labor and Workplace Standards Committee. House of Representatives State of Washington. Final Report for 2016 (Regular and Special Session)

The appropriate use of noncompetition agreements continued to be of interest to the Committee. HB 2406 and HB 2931 took different approaches to the issue. HB 2406 would have made noncompetition agreements void for specific occupations, including cosmetologists, drywall applicators, musicians, and fast food workers. Under HB 2931, agreements with temporary or seasonal employees, with independent contractors, and for employees terminated without just cause or laid off would have been void. In addition, courts would no longer be allowed to reform agreements. The bill also would have created a rebuttable presumption that an agreement for more than one year or for employees who are not executives is unreasonable and void.
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Submission to the Home Affairs Committee

Submission to the Home Affairs Committee

9. The Crown Prosecution Service has developed a Violence Against Women and Girls (VAWG) strategy to not only improve prosecutions of these crimes but also to show recognition of the United Nations, Council of Europe and End Violence Against Women Campaign initiatives. The Crown Prosecution Service makes reference to prostitution as being included in VAWG strategy and also has a policy and guidance report titled ‘Legal Guidance on Prosecuting Cases of Prostitution and Exploitation of Prostitution’. Within this report there are considerations laid out, such as ‘to encourage prostitutes to find routes out of prostitution and to deter those who create the demand for it’ 1 . This suggests
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Child sexual abuse and family outcomes

Child sexual abuse and family outcomes

Third, we found that, across the board, the ‘relational setting’ of the sexual victimization rather  than its vio- lence, serious or repeated nature was related to negative outcomes. Thus, it was whether sexual violence was per- petrated by a person to whom the victim is close, or in a relationship of dependence (such as a father or stepfa- ther), or whether that victimization occurred when the victim was still young and much more dependent on adult (parental) help and support, that impacted on out- comes, more than the specific nature of the abuse. Why that is the case is a matter for further investigation. A possible explanation could be that boys and girls who are victimized by their nuclear family members may want to escape from the family home, either to avoid the perpe- trator or to try and leave behind a dysfunctional family that may have led to the abuse in the first place. In try- ing to do so, they may make the transition to starting a family for themselves or marrying in a sense ‘too’ young, which in turn increases the risk for divorce later on. Sup- port for this may be found in the fact that the relationship to the perpetrator was not related to marriage in general, but was related to early marriage. Another explanation may be the breaking of trust that abuse by a nuclear fam- ily member, which is often a father, may incur—especially for young victims—attachment problems. This may lead to victims distrusting men or their partners, leading to dysfunctional relationships. In addition, when a father is the abuser, victims lose a person they would possibly otherwise go to for help; it may thus be that victims of intra-familial abuse received less support and care after the abuse. In that case, it may actually be the lack of sup- port that drives the association, rather than the abuse per se. It is also possible that a third variable explains both the abuse and the adverse family outcomes, such as fam- ily or neighborhood characteristics. Support for this may be found in the finding that especially abuse within the family, which could be a marker for family disadvantage, is associated with adverse outcomes. Research with tai- lored comparison groups is needed here.
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Child witnesses in sexual abuse trials

Child witnesses in sexual abuse trials

Appendix B 84 Transcripts of Videotaped Trial Description of Charge and Opening Statements 85 89 Child Witness Testimony - Court-given Child Witness Testimony - by Videodeposition 101 Ch[r]

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What is international child sexual abuse?

What is international child sexual abuse?

Æ ever- ever -more diverse e.g. child sex tourists going to more diverse e.g. child sex tourists going to countries in South East Asia, such as Thailand, and countries in South East Asia, such as Thailand, and abusing and photographing children there.

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Consequences and Treatment of Child Sexual Abuse

Consequences and Treatment of Child Sexual Abuse

responsible for the offender’s well-being, for the abuse, or for the consequences of reporting the abuse, as a result of offenders placing guilt on them. “Victims may also feel guilty for not having stopped the abuse as well as for any positive aspects of the abuse, such as physical pleasure, the special attention given by the offender, or an opportunity to have control over family members because of ‘the secret’” (“Treatment of Child Sexual Abuse”). In working with victims experiencing such guilt, therapists must aid the child in accepting emotionally and understanding intellectually that the child bears no responsibility for the abuse. Both feelings of guilt and the intrusive and invasive nature of the sexual abuse negatively affect victim’s sense of self and self-esteem. The effect is psychological (victims may view themselves as different from their peers) and physical (victims have an altered impression of their bodies). (“Treatment of Child Sexual Abuse”). To mitigate these effects, therapists must help victims to regain a positive self-esteem. It is helpful for therapists to address the issue of self-blame, as well as to have interventions that assist survivors in viewing themselves as more than just victims of sexual abuse. A final emotional consequence is anxiety and fear, where victims acquire phobic reactions to the abuse, the offender, and to other facets of the abuse. Victims may experience anxiety if they encounter experiences that elicit recollections of the abuse. Prior to treating fears and anxiety within victims, therapists must ensure that the victims are no longer experiencing sexual abuse. Therapists can then engage “the victim in a series of
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Online child sexual abuse imagery

Online child sexual abuse imagery

which were found to have child sexual abuse material. This is the fastest scanning tool yet developed and promises to hasten detection. Similarly, the IWF internal software development team are currently building to further automate the search for child sexual abuse material on the ‘dark net’. The ‘Dark Web’ crawler was created by Richard Franks of Simon University and has been working with the IWF Technical team to adjust the crawler to compliment the work the IWF already do online. Once the crawler is up and running, it will crawl hidden services for known child sexual abuse and alert analysts to new content.
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2016‐17 Budget Indigenous Affairs

2016‐17 Budget Indigenous Affairs

Contents    Introduction ...  4  Working with Indigenous people  ...  6  The National Congress of Australia’s First Nations People  ...  6  Constitutional recognition ...  6  Senate Inqu[r]

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