Top PDF House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7222, 12 February 2019: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7222, 12 February 2019: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7222, 12 February 2019: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

The Department has missed its recruitment targets for the last 4 years and there are signs that teacher shortages are growing. By taking a national view of the number of teachers required, the Department risks paying too little attention to clearly meaningful local patterns of supply and demand. The Department does not yet have the information it needs to understand how different routes into teaching impact on schools’ ability to recruit and retain newly qualified teachers, and cannot yet demonstrate how new arrangements are improving the quality of teaching in classrooms. The Department has plans to analyse existing data further. However, until the Department meets its targets and addresses the remaining information gaps, we cannot conclude that the arrangements for training new teachers are value for money. The Department will also need to show that the arrangements are more cost-effective than alternative expenditure, for instance on improving retention. 185
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 19 January 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 19 January 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

In November 2016, the NCTL launched a second pilot scheme to recruit returning teachers. Under the pilot, a package of support, including a bursary of £600 and a 2-4 week training course, was provided to returning teachers in maths, physics, and languages. Schools Direct lead schools, multi-academy trusts, and higher education institutions, among others, in the north-west and south-east were invited to become lead schools for the pilot. Lead schools were to be provided with grant funding and were responsible for coordinating the programme of support. They will receive a further payment upon employment of the returning teacher. The application round for the second cohort of the pilot closed on 20 February 2017.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 4 June 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 4 June 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

In February 2017, the Education Committee published the report of its inquiry into teacher supply: Recruitment and retention of teachers. The report concluded that “schools face increasing challenges of teacher shortages, particularly within certain subjects and regions” and that rising pupil numbers and changes to accountability, such as the focus on English Baccalaureate subjects, “will exacerbate existing problems.” It stated that the Government is aware of the issues but “needs to identify a strategic, long-term plan to effectively address them.” The “failure of the National Teaching Service”, had, it added, left “a gap in the Government’s plans to tackle regional shortages.” 128
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 17 October 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 17 October 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

The Department has missed its recruitment targets for the last 4 years and there are signs that teacher shortages are growing. By taking a national view of the number of teachers required, the Department risks paying too little attention to clearly meaningful local patterns of supply and demand. The Department does not yet have the information it needs to understand how different routes into teaching impact on schools’ ability to recruit and retain newly qualified teachers, and cannot yet demonstrate how new arrangements are improving the quality of teaching in classrooms. The Department has plans to analyse existing data further. However, until the Department meets its targets and addresses the remaining information gaps, we cannot conclude that the arrangements for training new teachers are value for money. The Department will also need to show that the arrangements are more cost-effective than alternative expenditure, for instance on improving retention. 149
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 13 June 2017: Initial teacher training in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 13 June 2017: Initial teacher training in England

More recently, in its April 2017 report, Whither Teacher Education and Training?, the Higher Education Policy Institute questioned the use of bursaries as an effective way of boosting recruitment and noted a suspicion that some trainees may be attracted by the bursary but do not intend to teach or stay in the profession for more than a couple of years. The report recommended the replacement of bursaries with a system of ‘forgivable fees’. Such a policy would, it said, “reward teaching and retention in the profession, not training” and would mean that teachers could be free of tuition fee debt by the age of 30. 35
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 17 October 2018: Initial teacher training in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 17 October 2018: Initial teacher training in England

More recently, in its April 2017 report, Whither Teacher Education and Training?, the Higher Education Policy Institute questioned the use of bursaries as an effective way of boosting recruitment and noted a suspicion that some trainees may be attracted by the bursary but do not intend to teach or stay in the profession for more than a couple of years. The report recommended the replacement of bursaries with a system of ‘forgivable fees’. Such a policy would, it said, “reward teaching and retention in the profession, not training” and would mean that teachers could be free of tuition fee debt by the age of 30. 50
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 06103, 11 February 2019: Relationships and Sex Education in Schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 06103, 11 February 2019: Relationships and Sex Education in Schools (England)

The report’s recommendation that PSHE be made part of the curriculum was part of the Children, Schools and Families Bill, Session 2009-10. The Library research paper 09/95 on the Bill sets out the proposals of the then Labour Government. The PSHE provisions and sex education generally were discussed during the Public Bill Committee – pp 13 and 14 of the Library research paper 10/12 give an account of the debates. However, many of the key provisions of the Bill were removed during the consideration of Lords Amendments on 8 April 2010 immediately before the dissolution of Parliament for the general election. The provisions removed included the introduction of compulsory PSHE, and the provision that all children receive at least one year of sex and relationship education. Incidentally, the provisions in the Bill that did survive are now contained in the Children, Schools and Families Act 2010 .
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 6 June 2018: Initial teacher training in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 6 June 2018: Initial teacher training in England

More recently, in its April 2017 report, Whither Teacher Education and Training?, the Higher Education Policy Institute questioned the use of bursaries as an effective way of boosting recruitment and noted a suspicion that some trainees may be attracted by the bursary but do not intend to teach or stay in the profession for more than a couple of years. The report recommended the replacement of bursaries with a system of ‘forgivable fees’. Such a policy would, it said, “reward teaching and retention in the profession, not training” and would mean that teachers could be free of tuition fee debt by the age of 30. 47
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 10 January 2018: Initial teacher training in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 10 January 2018: Initial teacher training in England

More recently, in its April 2017 report, Whither Teacher Education and Training?, the Higher Education Policy Institute questioned the use of bursaries as an effective way of boosting recruitment and noted a suspicion that some trainees may be attracted by the bursary but do not intend to teach or stay in the profession for more than a couple of years. The report recommended the replacement of bursaries with a system of ‘forgivable fees’. Such a policy would, it said, “reward teaching and retention in the profession, not training” and would mean that teachers could be free of tuition fee debt by the age of 30. 43
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7857, 7 February 2019: Higher education student numbers

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7857, 7 February 2019: Higher education student numbers

UCAS uses a number of different classifications of disadvantage among 18 year olds for its entry rates. These include where people live (POLAR4 classification of levels of young HE participation) and proxy measures for family income -whether the student was eligible for free school meals (FSM) or their family received a means-tested benefit while they were at school. According to UCAS:

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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 08444, 20 February 2019: Off-rolling in English schools

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 08444, 20 February 2019: Off-rolling in English schools

four local authorities reported significant increases in the number of children being educated at home and, in particular, concerns that this was not always in the children’s interests. There were disturbing references to children being removed from schools to be educated at home with the encouragement of the school as an alternative to exclusion. One local authority described it thus: “schools off rolling learners to [elective home education] when the families have no means to educate in order to protect their results records and school performance.” One local authority with nearly 2,000 children registered to be home educated said, “the majority have had some form of local authority intervention with a large proportion known to social services.” 6
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 5440: 12 June 2019: Higher Education Finance Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 5440: 12 June 2019: Higher Education Finance Statistics

There was much variation across individual institutions and even with an aggregate surplus of 2.7% there were still 47 of 165 institutions in deficit in 2017/18. This was higher than at any time in the past decade. The distribution is illustrated opposite. One clear pattern is the large drop off between those in surplus by a few percentage points and those in deficit by more than 1%. While most institutions were in the -1% to +8% range a small number had much larger surpluses/deficits.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08543: 28 June 2019: Children's social care services in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08543: 28 June 2019: Children's social care services in England

The work shows, therefore, that spend on children has in fact been overall broadly resilient over the last 20 years, even taking into account the effects of the 2008 recession. Within that overall figure, however, are some worrying trends. Mainstream and acute services such as age 4-16 education and provision for children in care have been protected at the expense of targeted preventative services, removing vital safety nets for some very vulnerable children. The 60% cut in Sure Start and youth services will see an increasing number of vulnerable children fall through the gaps. England now spends nearly half of its entire children’s services budget on 73,000 children in the care system – leaving the other half for the remaining 11.7 million kids.
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House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 07388, 18 September 2019: Language teaching in schools (England)

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 07388, 18 September 2019: Language teaching in schools (England)

The decision not to enter a pupil for the EBacc combination of subjects will need to be considered on a case by case basis by each school, and schools will need to take into account a range of factors particular to each pupil. These will include, for example, complex SEN; having spent significant amounts of time out of education; recently arriving in the country; and only being able to take a limited number of key stage 4 qualifications as significant additional time is needed in the curriculum for English and mathematics. We believe that no single factor should automatically exclude a pupil from entering the EBacc. 34
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 07148, 5 April 2019: The School Day and Year (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 07148, 5 April 2019: The School Day and Year (England)

The Deregulation Act 2015 provides for the responsibility for determining term dates to pass to school governing bodies at community, voluntary controlled, community special and maintained nursery schools in England. However, this provision is not yet in force. The head teacher of a maintained school will recommend the length of a school day, including session times and breaks. The governing body must agree the recommendation. Academies, including free schools, set their own term dates and school day.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 8386, 17 April 2019: Cost of university courses in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 8386, 17 April 2019: Cost of university courses in England

Experience Survey, stated that from 2012 to 2017 there was a constant decline in the number of students stating that they felt their higher education represented good value for money. In 2018 however the number of students who said that their course was good value for money increased by 3% to 38%. – but there was still a significant proportion of students (32%) who said that their course was poor, or very poor value for money. The survey further showed that students perceptions of value for money varied across institutions and across subjects – with students at Russell Group universities and on medical degrees showing the highest levels of satisfaction.
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 08414, 1 August 2019 : School uniform costs in England

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 08414, 1 August 2019 : School uniform costs in England

2.5 The government wants to ensure that families get the best value for school uniforms. A 2015 Department for Education survey found that nearly one-fifth of parents and carers reported that they had suffered financial hardship as a result of purchasing their child’s school uniform. The survey found that parents and carers are significantly less likely to report that they have experienced hardship if schools allow them to purchase uniforms from a variety of suppliers. The government wants to ensure that effective competition is used to drive better value for money and will therefore put existing best practice guidance for school uniform supply in England on a statutory footing. This will ensure that schools deliver the best value for parents by avoiding exclusivity arrangements unless regular competitions for suppliers are run. (pg 11)
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 07091, 5 August 2019 : School inspections in England : Ofsted

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 07091, 5 August 2019 : School inspections in England : Ofsted

From January 2016 to July 2018, we identified 420 suspected unregistered schools in England, and so far, we have inspected 274. We have issued 63 warning notices. During this time, 56 settings have closed or ceased operating illegally and the 7 remaining cases are still under active investigation. We find out about unregistered schools from a wide range of sources, including from our own workforce. Sometimes parents tell us, or the local authority raises concerns, or the police or the DfE […]

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8151, 19 February 2018: Higher education tuition fees in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8151, 19 February 2018: Higher education tuition fees in England

Teaching and Higher Education Act 1998 . These fees were paid upfront by students and fee waivers were available for low income students. In 2006 fees rose to £3,000 per year when the Higher Education Act 2004 abolished upfront tuition fee payments and introduced a new system of deferred variable fees and tuition fee loans. Higher education institutions (HEIs) were able to choose their level of tuition fees up to the maximum of £3,000 per year. In the first year of higher fees nearly all HEIs in England chose to charge the maximum in fees. The 2004 Act established the Office for Fair Access (OFFA) to maintain equal access to higher education for disadvantaged students. Only HEIs with an access agreement in place which had been agreed by OFFA were allowed to charge the highest level of tuition fees.
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 0616, 31 July 2019 : Oxford 'elitism'

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 0616, 31 July 2019 : Oxford 'elitism'

This information is provided to Members of Parliament in support of their parliamentary duties. It is a general briefing only and should not be relied on as a substitute for specific advice. The House of Commons or the author(s) shall not be liable for any errors or omissions, or for any loss or damage of any kind arising from its use, and may remove, vary or amend any information at any time without prior notice.

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