Top PDF House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 7951, 21 August 2019: T Levels: Reforms to Technical Education

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 7951, 21 August 2019: T Levels: Reforms to Technical Education

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 7951, 21 August 2019: T Levels: Reforms to Technical Education

In addition to this economic rationale, the report outlined a social need for change: that individuals should have access to a national system of technical qualifications that is easy to understand, has credibility with employers and remains stable over time. The current system, it argued, failed on all three counts, comprising “a confusing and ever-changing multitude of qualifications”, many of which “hold little value in the eyes of individuals and are not understood or sought by employers.” The report added that learners, teachers and the public have “long regarded technical education qualifications as inferior to academic qualifications”, and higher level technical qualifications “have too often become divorced from the actual occupations they should be preparing individuals for.” 14
Show more

29 Read more

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 7951, 23 April 2019 : T levels : reforms to technical education

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 7951, 23 April 2019 : T levels : reforms to technical education

Also in August 2018, the Department for Education published a research report concerning employer engagement and support for industry placements. The report stated that, overall, employers welcomed the idea of industry placements, and the length of placement was seen as providing enough time for the young person to begin to make a positive contribution to the business. The report stated that many employers indicated that they would be willing to offer industry placements if they received clarification on some key points – for example, the objectives of the placement. A small group of employers stated that they would be unwilling to offer placements, either because they could not see the benefits of T Levels over other qualifications (more typical for employers in industries with more established
Show more

28 Read more

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 7951, 21 December 2018 : T Levels : reforms to technical education

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 7951, 21 December 2018 : T Levels : reforms to technical education

In addition to this economic rationale, the report outlined a social need for change: that individuals should have access to a national system of technical qualifications that is easy to understand, has credibility with employers and remains stable over time. The current system, it argued, failed on all three counts, comprising “a confusing and ever-changing multitude of qualifications”, many of which “hold little value in the eyes of individuals and are not understood or sought by employers.” The report added that learners, teachers and the public have “long regarded technical education qualifications as inferior to academic qualifications”, and higher level technical qualifications “have too often become
Show more

25 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 21 June 2017: Reforms to Technical Education

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 21 June 2017: Reforms to Technical Education

We will establish new institutes of technology, backed by leading employers and linked to leading universities, in every major city in England. They will provide courses at degree level and above, specialising in technical disciplines, such as STEM, whilst also providing higher-level apprenticeships and bespoke courses for employers. They will enjoy the freedoms that make our universities great, including eligibility for public funding for productivity and skills research, and access to loans and grants for their students. They will be able to gain royal charter status and regius professorships in technical education. Above all, they will become anchor institutions for local, regional and national industry, providing sought-after skills to support the economy,
Show more

24 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 8 January 2018: Technical education reforms

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 8 January 2018: Technical education reforms

We will establish new institutes of technology, backed by leading employers and linked to leading universities, in every major city in England. They will provide courses at degree level and above, specialising in technical disciplines, such as STEM, whilst also providing higher-level apprenticeships and bespoke courses for employers. They will enjoy the freedoms that make our universities great, including eligibility for public funding for productivity and skills research, and access to loans and grants for their students. They will be able to gain royal charter status and regius professorships in technical education. Above all, they will become anchor institutions for local, regional and national industry, providing sought-after skills to support the economy, and developing their own local identity to make sure they can meet the skills needs of local employers. 74
Show more

30 Read more

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 8593, 21 August 2019: Support for students with mental health issues in higher education in England

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 8593, 21 August 2019: Support for students with mental health issues in higher education in England

3. Factors contributing to the rise in students with mental health conditions A number of factors may be leading to the increase in the number of students reporting a mental health condition. One contributory factor is the rise in the number of young undergraduates - adults aged 16–24 today are more likely than previous generations of young adults to experience common mental health conditions. The 2017 IPPR report commented that “a large and growing proportion of people are choosing to enrol in undergraduate courses in the UK, with a majority falling within the age range in which there is an added risk of
Show more

18 Read more

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 5871, 13 August 2019 : Youth Unemployment Statistics

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 5871, 13 August 2019 : Youth Unemployment Statistics

Figures are based on a survey so some of the reported changes may arise from survey error rather than ‘real’ changes in the levels. The unemployment rate (the proportion of the economically active population who are unemployed) for 16-24 year olds was 11.6% in April to June 2019. This is up from 10.8% in the previous quarter and up from 11.3% a year before.

6 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 07250: 23 December 2019: University Technical Colleges

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 07250: 23 December 2019: University Technical Colleges

to accept that UTCs had not worked as an experiment, despite some successes. He attributed the weaknesses of the policy to several factors: The first is the principle that admission should be at the age of 14. The originator of the UTC idea, Kenneth Baker, has argued that all students should be divided at 14 and given the option of either a technical, or artistic and creative, or academic education. He saw UTCs as the vanguard of this revolution. But other schools have seen them as destinations for underperforming children. Students whose poor academic prospects might hamper league table performance have been directed towards UTCs and higher- performing contemporaries have been warned off. On top of that, many parents and students themselves have felt that 14 is too young to opt for a narrowly specialist path. 97
Show more

38 Read more

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 07585, 8 August 2019 : The Troubled Families Programme (England)

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 07585, 8 August 2019 : The Troubled Families Programme (England)

Quantitative outcomes analysis to follow Over the course of this evaluation, all the outcomes data explored above will continue to be analysed. For other outcomes, like those related to domestic abuse, impact analysis has not been, and is unlikely to be possible. According to the evaluation’s survey data, there has been “no statistically significant change in overall levels of reported domestic abuse or violence.” 112 Quantitative data on health is not yet available but surveys have so far suggested that households had visited their GPs less and featured fewer people with a long-term illness. At the same time, self-reported health statuses and feelings of wellbeing had not changed significantly over time. 113
Show more

52 Read more

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 08414, 1 August 2019 : School uniform costs in England

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 08414, 1 August 2019 : School uniform costs in England

2.5 The government wants to ensure that families get the best value for school uniforms. A 2015 Department for Education survey found that nearly one-fifth of parents and carers reported that they had suffered financial hardship as a result of purchasing their child’s school uniform. The survey found that parents and carers are significantly less likely to report that they have experienced hardship if schools allow them to purchase uniforms from a variety of suppliers. The government wants to ensure that effective competition is used to drive better value for money and will therefore put existing best practice guidance for school uniform supply in England on a statutory footing. This will ensure that schools deliver the best value for parents by avoiding exclusivity arrangements unless regular competitions for suppliers are run. (pg 11)
Show more

7 Read more

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 07091, 5 August 2019 : School inspections in England : Ofsted

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 07091, 5 August 2019 : School inspections in England : Ofsted

September 2018 Accountability Commission report. 13 The Education Policy Institute (EPI) think tank praised many aspects of the new framework, including its focus on off-rolling and schools’ use of exclusion. EPI also commended “improvements to the framework which are welcome because they have the potential to promote judgements that are sharper with respect to the inclusion of vulnerable learners and fairer to schools with more of these pupils.” However, it criticised Ofsted’s decision to stop recommending that some schools review their use of the Pupil Premium, and for the framework’s approach to speaking and listening skills in the early years and in the teaching of early reading. 14
Show more

21 Read more

House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7393, 1 July 2019 : Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7393, 1 July 2019 : Higher education funding in England

Pre-2015 reforms The Government made estimates of the percentage RAB rate on new loans from 2012 when it published proposals for changes to funding. These are discussed in some detail in Changes to higher education funding and student support in England from 2012/13. The estimated RAB rate on new loans was put at ‘around 30%’, but subsequently increased to ‘around 35%’ 25 then to 35%-40% 26 , revised upwards again to ‘around 40%’ 27 and later to ‘around 45%’. 28 These increases were largely due to changes in economic forecasts, particularly on earnings. 29 These less optimistic forecast reduce the expected cash value of repayments and or delay when they will be made. Other factors behind the increase in the RAB rate include the higher than expected level of average tuition fee loans, a change to the timing of repayment
Show more

20 Read more

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 7393, 4 January 2019 : Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 7393, 4 January 2019 : Higher education funding in England

The subsidy element of loans is not included in the Government’s main measure of public spending on services and hence does not count towards the fiscal deficit. The total face value of loans do count towards the national debt. There is considerable uncertainty about the final size of the subsidy element of loans and the Government’s estimate of it increased sharply after the 2012 reforms were first announced. Subsequent changes to loan terms and accounting methods are expected to reduce the size of this subsidy to an even greater degree. These calculations affect the size of any saving in public expenditure and the extent of the shift in costs from the state to the individual beneficiary.
Show more

19 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 5440: 12 June 2019: Higher Education Finance Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 5440: 12 June 2019: Higher Education Finance Statistics

Expenditure here is used as a proxy for the (financial) size of the sector. Total spending is clearly constrained by income. The increase in total expenditure for the whole period was greater than the increase in full-time equivalent student numbers. In the mid- to late-1990s real spending increased at a slower rate, but this pattern was reversed over the following decade. The gap closed somewhat over the three years to 2011/12 as student numbers continued to grow, while spending was broadly flat. Since then expenditure has increased in real terms, but student numbers fell for three years and are still below 2010/11 levels. 17 18 The costs associated with students can vary greatly by level and subject. This note does not look at all these factors.
Show more

23 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7857, 7 February 2019: Higher education student numbers

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7857, 7 February 2019: Higher education student numbers

The size of the gap between FSM and non-FSM students has fallen in relative but not absolute terms over the past decade. The relative gap itself increased slightly in 2016 and 2017. It fell slightly in 2018, but is still higher than in 2015. The entry rate gap between students from the areas with the highest and lowest levels of historical participation (POLAR groups 5 and 1) has fallen in both relative and absolute terms over time. This was also the case for the most advantaged and

20 Read more

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 8732, 4 November 2019: Level 4 and 5 education

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 8732, 4 November 2019: Level 4 and 5 education

Terms of reference The terms of reference for the Review stated that it aimed to ensure joined up system that delivers the technical skills needed by the economy: This review will look further at how we can ensure our post-18 education system is joined up and supported by a funding system that works for students and taxpayers. For example, in recent years the system has encouraged growth in three-year degrees for 18 year- olds, but does not offer a comprehensive range of high quality alternative routes for the many young people who pursue a technical or vocational path at this age. The majority of universities charge the maximum possible fees for at least some of their courses and three- year courses remain the norm. Average levels of graduate debt have increased, but this has not always led to higher wage returns for all graduates. And the system does not comprehensively deliver the advanced technical skills that our economy needs. 64
Show more

21 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08072, 4 August 2017: School Governance

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08072, 4 August 2017: School Governance

Recruitment of school governors can be challenging. In 2016, Ofsted reported that “recruitment and retention of governors is a serious challenge.” 8 A 2014 report from the University of Bath found that there was a shortage of potential parent governors and willing volunteers from staff and the wider community. It also found that “recruiting governors is harder in special schools and primary schools, schools serving disadvantaged areas, schools in urban/city and town locations, schools with below average levels of pupil attainment, schools with a Requires Improvement/Satisfactory Ofsted grade and schools that are not academies.” 9
Show more

10 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06103, 1 August 2018: Relationships and Sex Education in Schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06103, 1 August 2018: Relationships and Sex Education in Schools (England)

8.3 Of the remaining responses there were 516 on whether the changes to the SMSC [spiritual, moral, social and cultural] standard are required to ensure the active promotion of fundamental British values and respect for other people. A significant number of respondents indicated that they disagreed with the proposed changes, but analysis of the related comments revealed that this was because of misunderstanding the effect or raising issues that were not part of the consultation. For example, some responses questioned the definition of the fundamental British values and requested that this be opened up for further debate; others maintained that the changes extend the equality agenda and will result in the marginalisation of Christianity; and others considered that the changes are not necessary, that the standards were only amended in January 2013, and that many schools are already doing this.
Show more

28 Read more

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 8538, 14 August 2019: The Review of University Admissions

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 8538, 14 August 2019: The Review of University Admissions

Research has shown that external factors such as ‘schooling effects’ and family background have a major influence on the performance of students in exams and on the educational aspirat[r]

26 Read more

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 1078, 11 September 2019: Education spending in the UK

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 1078, 11 September 2019: Education spending in the UK

This paper retains the distinction between the terms for two reasons. First the education and training series only goes back to the late 1980s, while the education series goes back much further, even with some breaks in the series the concept remains the same. Second the education and training series is more consistent over the period it is available for. The spending data are regularly revised. These revisions can change the total figure, or move items of expenditure from one sub-function to another. The detailed breakdown by sub-function is only revised back five years. This presents a problem with consistency when trying to compile long-term series based on sub-functions and the authors warn against simply splicing one set of data with another pre and post-revision. The education and training series in this paper is therefore consistent for its entire length, other than the break in 2011-12 detailed below. The education series is not and although revisions are generally quite small, readers should be careful when drawing conclusions from this data, especially those based on small differences.
Show more

24 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...

Related subjects