Top PDF House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 07819, 8 March 2018: Constituency casework: schools in Scotland

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper:  Number 07819, 8 March 2018: Constituency casework: schools in Scotland

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 07819, 8 March 2018: Constituency casework: schools in Scotland

Members often receive enquiries from constituents about school-related matters. Many of these can be answered from readily available information on the internet or in standard publications. Where complex issues are raised it may be more appropriate to refer the constituent to specialist bodies and organisations or to a solicitor if legal advice is sought. This note gives a very brief overview of the structure of the state-maintained school system, including an outline of the different categories of schools, as often an answer to a school-related constituency question may depend upon the type of school in question. The note provides brief background and key sources on a selection of issues that are typically raised with Members by constituents. Members who have questions on topics not covered here may contact the Social Policy Section for information.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 07819: 27 June 2019: Constituency casework: schools in Scotland

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 07819: 27 June 2019: Constituency casework: schools in Scotland

Members often receive enquiries from constituents about school-related matters. Many of these can be answered from readily available information on the internet or in standard publications. Where complex issues are raised it may be more appropriate to refer the constituent to specialist bodies and organisations or to a solicitor if legal advice is sought. This note gives a very brief overview of the structure of the state-maintained school system, including an outline of the different categories of schools, as often an answer to a school-related constituency question may depend upon the type of school in question. The note provides brief background and key sources on a selection of issues that are typically raised with Members by constituents. Members who have questions on topics not covered here may contact the Social Policy Section for information.
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House of Commons library: Briefing paper: Number 07819, 2 December 2016: Constituency casework: schools in Scotland

House of Commons library: Briefing paper: Number 07819, 2 December 2016: Constituency casework: schools in Scotland

Members often receive enquiries from constituents about school-related matters. Many of these can be answered from readily available information on the internet or in standard publications. Where complex issues are raised it may be more appropriate to refer the constituent to specialist bodies and organisations or to a solicitor if legal advice is sought. This note gives a very brief overview of the structure of the state-maintained school system, including an outline of the different categories of schools, as often an answer to a school-related constituency question may depend upon the type of school in question. The note provides brief background and key sources on a selection of issues that are typically raised with Members by constituents. Members who have questions on topics not covered here may contact the Social Policy Section for information.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 05396, 25 October 2018: Constituency casework: schools in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 05396, 25 October 2018: Constituency casework: schools in England

Decisions about maintained school closures are taken locally following a statutory process, which is set out in the statutory guidance, Chapter 3. There is a presumption against the closure of rural schools. However, as the DfE Guidance for decision-makers explains, this does not mean that a rural school will never close, but the case for closure should be strong and a proposal clearly in the best interests of educational provision in the area. The factors that must be considered are set out in the guidance (chapter 5).

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 04195, 8 November 2018: School meals and nutritional standards (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 04195, 8 November 2018: School meals and nutritional standards (England)

3.4 To enable a greater number of children to benefit from free school meals, we are proposing a net earnings threshold of £7,400 per annum for a household’s eligibility for free school meals. We estimate that, under this threshold, an extra 50,000 children would become eligible for free school meals, compared to today’s number of claimants. It is important to note that the net earnings threshold does not represent a household’s total income, as it does not include their income from benefits, which significantly increase a household’s overall income. A typical family earning around £7,400 per annum would, depending on their exact circumstances, have a total household income of between £18,000 and £24,000 once benefits are taken into account. 12
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8389, 19 September 2018: Returns to a degree

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8389, 19 September 2018: Returns to a degree

Margaret Hodge: We said in the White Paper, "The Future of Higher Education", that graduates enjoy different returns from different courses and according to the institution attended. Recent research found a 44 percentage point difference in average returns between graduates from institutions at the two extremes of the graduate pay scale. No specific estimates have been made of the distribution of lifetime earnings premia by type of course or institution attended, for either first-degree graduates or post-graduates. However, we will be publishing research evidence later this year on how lifetime earnings premia might differ according to institution attended.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP08198, 10 January 2018: Advertising to children

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP08198, 10 January 2018: Advertising to children

advertising, under the “UK Code of Non-Broadcast Advertising, Sales Promotion and Direct Marketing,” known as the “CAP Code”. The system is co-regulatory for broadcast advertising; there is a co- regulatory partnership between the ASA and Ofcom. The “UK Code of Broadcast Advertising” (BCAP Codes) is known as the BCAP Code. On 1 March 2011, the ASA’s remit was extended significantly to cover marketing communications on companies’ own websites and in other third party space under their control, such as social networking sites like Twitter and Facebook. The CAP Code applies in full to this new space. This regulatory system is funded entirely by the advertising industry by a levy on advertising spend. According to the ASA website, the levy is currently set at 0.1% on the cost of buying advertising space and 0.2% on some direct mail. This is collected at ‘arm’s length’ on behalf of CAP, BCAP and the ASA by two bodies: the Advertising Standards Board of Finance and the Broadcast Advertising Standards Board of Finance. The ASA is therefore able to act independently of both Government and industry.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6700, 17 April 2018: The Pupil Premium

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6700, 17 April 2018: The Pupil Premium

Not all disadvantaged pupils currently attract funding. Some schools do not focus funding on disadvantaged pupils appropriately or use the most cost-effective interventions, and, in any event, the evidence base is still underdeveloped. Furthermore, the core school funding that the Pupil Premium supplements is not distributed on the basis of need. Most importantly, there is a risk that accountability and intervention mechanisms allow schools to waste money on ineffective activities for many years without effective challenge. As the impact of the Pupil Premium becomes clearer, the Department will need to review if it is investing the right amount in it, including whether spending more in this way could allow it to close the gap more quickly, generating wider savings for the taxpayer. 38
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08083, 8 September 2017: Gypsies and Travellers

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08083, 8 September 2017: Gypsies and Travellers

On 8 July 2017, LCMco published a report commissioned by King’s College London (KCL), The underrepresentation of Gypsy, Roma and Traveller pupils in higher education. This research considered barriers to educational attainment and progress from the early years onwards. The report cites data on school-level attainment and progress suggesting much lower rates of attainment for Gypsy, Roma and Traveller pupils than the national average, but emphasises that the figures should be treated with caution “as the characteristics and circumstances of individuals who are willing and able to ascribe their Gypsy, Roma or Traveller identity may not be representative of this population as a whole”. 98
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 04195, 8 February 2018: School meals and nutritional standards (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 04195, 8 February 2018: School meals and nutritional standards (England)

4.4 Under our proposed threshold, a number of low-income households who are not currently entitled to free school meals will become newly entitled, and the vast majority (around 90%) of pupils currently eligible for free school meals will continue to be eligible. However, although we are increasing the number of eligible children, some households (particularly those working fewer hours but with higher incomes) will have earnings above the new threshold, and would therefore stand to lose eligibility. 12

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6103, 2 March 2017: Sex and Relationships Education in Schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6103, 2 March 2017: Sex and Relationships Education in Schools (England)

8.2 In relation to equality legislation, the proposals are that schools should encourage pupils to respect other people, even if they do not agree with them. This does not extend equality requirements or discriminate against Christianity or religious freedoms. The amended standard would not require a school to do anything that they are not currently required to do by the Equality Act 2010 (which applies to independent schools). 8.3 Of the remaining responses there were 516 on whether the changes to the SMSC [spiritual, moral, social and cultural] standard are required to ensure the active promotion of fundamental British values and respect for other people. A significant number of respondents indicated that they disagreed with the proposed changes, but analysis of the related comments revealed that this was because of misunderstanding the effect or raising issues that were not part of the consultation. For example, some responses questioned the definition of the fundamental British values and requested that this be opened up for further debate; others maintained that the changes extend the equality agenda and will result in the marginalisation of Christianity; and others considered that the changes are not necessary, that the standards were only amended in January 2013, and that many schools are already doing this.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07236, 9 January 2018: Careers guidance in schools, colleges and universities

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07236, 9 January 2018: Careers guidance in schools, colleges and universities

[E]very word of the clause is needed because the clause is going to be met with great hostility in every school in the country. They are going to be required, by September, to produce a policy for implementing a right for people to come and tell them about other competitive sources of learning and training. It will require all the resources of the department and the powers of the Secretary of State to ensure that this happens, so that in September and October of this year we should have providers going into all the schools. 12

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06103, 1 August 2018: Relationships and Sex Education in Schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06103, 1 August 2018: Relationships and Sex Education in Schools (England)

The report’s recommendation that PSHE be made part of the curriculum was part of the Children, Schools and Families Bill, Session 2009-10. The Library research paper 09/95 on the Bill sets out the proposals of the then Labour Government. The PSHE provisions and sex education generally were discussed during the Public Bill Committee – pp 13 and 14 of the Library research paper 10/12 give an account of the debates. However, many of the key provisions of the Bill were removed during the consideration of Lords Amendments on 8 April 2010 immediately before the dissolution of Parliament for the general election. The provisions removed included the introduction of compulsory PSHE, and the provision that all children receive at least one year of sex and relationship education. Incidentally, the provisions in the Bill that did survive are now contained in the Children, Schools and Families Act 2010 .
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number CBP 07345, 11 April 2018: Counter-extremism policy in English schools

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number CBP 07345, 11 April 2018: Counter-extremism policy in English schools

We, therefore, recommend that all organisations offering out-of-school-hours provision, as well as individuals offering private tution on a commercial basis, be required to register with[r]

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 5108, 23 May 2018: Home education in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 5108, 23 May 2018: Home education in England

Lord Agnew of Oulton: Children who are educated at home can also be registered at school and attend school for part of the week. Such an arrangement is known as ‘flexi-schooling’. Schools are under no obligation to agree to such an arrangement, but some are happy to do so. Schools must enter a pupil on the admission register from the beginning of the first day that the pupil will attend the school; this will include a pupil who is flexi- schooled. Where a school has agreed to a flexi-schooling arrangement, the time a child spends being educated at home should be recorded as absence.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7070, 9 March 2017: Recent policy developments: Grammar schools in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7070, 9 March 2017: Recent policy developments: Grammar schools in England

It is this Government’s policy that all good and outstanding schools should be able to expand to offer excellent places to local students. The Weald of Kent Grammar School is one of the top performing schools in the country, with 99% of its students achieving five A*-C grades in GCSE exams in 2014, and 98% of sixth form students achieving at least 3 A-Levels at grades A*-E. The Weald of Kent Grammar School submitted a proposal for expansion in 2013. At that stage the then Secretary of State could not approve the proposal as an expansion because the proposal at that time was for a mixed sex annexe when the existing school was single sex. The school submitted a revised proposal in September 2015 under which girls will be educated on both sites alongside a mixed sex sixth form. I am satisfied that this proposal represents a genuine expansion of the existing school, and that there will be integration between the two sites in terms of leadership, management, governance, admissions and curriculum. I am also satisfied that the excellent quality of learning currently delivered will be replicated across the newly expanded school. I welcome the fact that the newly expanded school will better meet the needs of parents in the local area, with 41% of existing pupils at the Weald of Kent Grammar School already travelling from the Sevenoaks area.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08117, 7 June 2018: Sexual harassment in education

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08117, 7 June 2018: Sexual harassment in education

Local authority maintained schools in England are obliged to teach sex and relationships education (SRE) from age 11 upwards, and must have regard to the Government’s SRE guidance. Academies and free schools, the majority in secondary education in England, do not have to follow the National Curriculum and so are not under this obligation. If they do decide to teach SRE, they also must have regard to the guidance. Parents are free to withdraw their children from SRE if they wish to do so. The only exceptions to this are the biological aspects of human growth and reproduction that are essential elements of National Curriculum Science.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7049, 27 February 2018: Postgraduate loans in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7049, 27 February 2018: Postgraduate loans in England

The public funding available to postgraduate students has traditionally been limited compared to that available for undergraduates. Concerns were raised that a lack of available funding could be contributing to a decline in the number of UK postgraduate students, particularly those on taught courses, and could limit social mobility. Such concerns led a number of reports to recommend the introduction of some form of postgraduate loans system.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7096, 31 August 2018: Poverty in the UK: statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7096, 31 August 2018: Poverty in the UK: statistics

judgement about what constitutes minimum needs. Successive governments have argued there is no single, objective way of determining what constitutes a minimum acceptable income for a particular person or family, although independent researchers have made a number of attempts. Section 2 of Library Research Paper 13/1, Welfare Benefits Uprating Bill, 2013 , gives an overview of the debate. One such attempt is a major annual research project funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, which estimates Minimum Income Standards (MIS) for different household types in the UK. This involves in- depth consultation with members of the public, combined with expert knowledge, to identify the level of income required to meet a minimum acceptable standard of living: “having what you need in order to have the opportunities and choices necessary to participate in society.” The first findings were published in 2008 and are updated each year. 36
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06798, 16 April 2018: The school curriculum in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06798, 16 April 2018: The school curriculum in England

Maintained schools are also currently required to offer other subjects, including religious education (RE) at all ages and sex and relationships education at secondary level. Academies and free schools don’t have to follow the national curriculum. They must, however, offer a broad and balanced curriculum that covers English, maths, sciences and RE. Primary academies must also take part in national curriculum assessments, commonly referred to as SATs.

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