Top PDF House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 07819, 8 March 2018: Constituency casework: schools in Scotland

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper:  Number 07819, 8 March 2018: Constituency casework: schools in Scotland

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 07819, 8 March 2018: Constituency casework: schools in Scotland

The Scottish Government guide to Choosing a School states that: If you have a child who is due to start primary school or who will be transferring to secondary school soon, your council will probably suggest that you should use the local school designated by them. Of course most people are happy to do so, but the council must also tell you of your right to choose a different school. It can give you a contact address where you can get information to help in making up your mind. If you write to a council and request a place in a particular school, this is known as a placing request. The council has a duty to grant such a request wherever possible. However, the size of the school, the current roll and number of children who already live in the catchment area and other factors will affect the council's ability to grant a placing request. 9
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 07819: 27 June 2019: Constituency casework: schools in Scotland

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 07819: 27 June 2019: Constituency casework: schools in Scotland

The Scottish Government guide to Choosing a School states that: If you have a child who is due to start primary school or who will be transferring to secondary school soon, your council will probably suggest that you should use the local school designated by them. Of course most people are happy to do so, but the council must also tell you of your right to choose a different school. It can give you a contact address where you can get information to help in making up your mind. If you write to a council and request a place in a particular school, this is known as a placing request. The council has a duty to grant such a request wherever possible. However, the size of the school, the current roll and number of children who already live in the catchment area and other factors will affect the council's ability to grant a placing request. 7
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House of Commons library: Briefing paper: Number 07819, 2 December 2016: Constituency casework: schools in Scotland

House of Commons library: Briefing paper: Number 07819, 2 December 2016: Constituency casework: schools in Scotland

The Scottish Government guide to Choosing a School states that: If you have a child who is due to start primary school or who will be transferring to secondary school soon, your council will probably suggest that you should use the local school designated by them. Of course most people are happy to do so, but the council must also tell you of your right to choose a different school. It can give you a contact address where you can get information to help in making up your mind. If you write to a council and request a place in a particular school, this is known as a placing request. The council has a duty to grant such a request wherever possible. However, the size of the school, the current roll and number of children who already live in the catchment area and other factors will affect the council's ability to grant a placing request. 7
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 05396, 25 October 2018: Constituency casework: schools in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 05396, 25 October 2018: Constituency casework: schools in England

Introductory information about exclusion and the appeal process is provided on the gov.uk School discipline and exclusions website. Under the Education Act 2011 new arrangements for school exclusion came into force in September 2012. These apply to any pupil excluded on or after 1 September 2012 from a maintained school, academy/free school, alternative provision academy/free school or pupil referral unit in England. Independent appeal panels were replaced by independent review panels, which do not have the power to order reinstatement of a pupil. The independent review panels are able to impose financial penalties on schools that exclude pupils unreasonably.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 07904, 21 February 2017: Constituency casework: schools in Wales

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 07904, 21 February 2017: Constituency casework: schools in Wales

• Whether there is demand for the expansion in school places, with regard to the schools language, religious character, or gender intake • Whether proposals will improve access for disabled pupils in accordance with requirements under the Equality Act 2010 5 Other factors, such as the impact on the funding of education, the impact on the attainment of children from economically deprived backgrounds, equality issues, and whether the school or schools involved are subject to any trust or charitable interests which might be affected by the proposal, should also be taken into account. 6
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07972, 30 May 2018: Independent schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07972, 30 May 2018: Independent schools (England)

6 However, the DfE has stated that clarification is being sought on “the age at which a young person may have the right to make their own decisions,” and that a blanket right for parents to withdraw their child from sex education is no longer consistent with English caselaw (or with the ECHR and UNCRC). The outcome will be set out in regulations which will be subject to consultation and debate. See Department for Education, Policy Statement: Relationships Education, Relationships and Sex Education, and Personal, Social, Health, and Economic Education, March 2017

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07070, 15 May 2018: Grammar schools in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07070, 15 May 2018: Grammar schools in England

achieved solely by increasing the PAN in line with the School Admissions Code. 14 In the case of community, foundation and voluntary schools, local authorities can also propose that a school’s premises be enlarged by following a streamlined statutory process set out in regulations. 15 Academies wishing to enlarge their premises need to seek approval from the Secretary of State, through the Education Funding Agency (EFA). They are not required to submit a formal business case to the EFA unless the expansion is very large scale or increases pupil numbers to 2,000 or more. Further information is contained in advice published by the Department for Education in March 2016, Making significant changes to an open academy. 16
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 8 June 2018: School Sport in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 8 June 2018: School Sport in England

Single and small academy trusts and sixth form colleges were able to bid for funding through the Condition Improvement Fund, with guidance published by the Education and Skills Funding Agency stating that the HPCF “is intended to improve children’s and young people’s physical and mental health by enhancing access to facilities for physical activity, healthy eating, mental health and wellbeing and medical conditions, such as kitchens, dining facilities, changing rooms, playgrounds and sports facilities.” 33 In March 2018 the Education and Skills Funding Agency published the list of schools who had successfully bid for funding from the Condition Improvement Fund. £38 million will be provided for specific projects supported by the HPCF in 2018-19. 34 Local authorities, large multi-academy trusts and other bodies are not eligible to bid for the Condition Improvement Fund and instead receive School Condition Allocations (SCA). They will receive a direct allocation from the HPCF in addition to their normal SCA for 2018-19. 35 School
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07250, 8 March 2017: University Technical Colleges

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07250, 8 March 2017: University Technical Colleges

In December 2015, the Government confirmed in a response to a Parliamentary Question that student applications for UTCs were being encouraged: Nick Boles: Like all academies, each university technical college (UTC) is responsible for publicising their school and encouraging applications. Officials from the Department for Education and the Baker Dearing Educational Trust provide UTCs with advice to support pupil recruitment, drawing on the best practice from UTCs and other new schools. Statutory guidance to schools on careers guidance is clear that they should allow UTCs to engage with their pupils on their premises. This guidance can be found at GOV.UK:https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/careers- guidance-provision-for-young-people-in-schools. This careers guidance should ensure pupils have information about their full range of education and training options. 22
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 10 October 2018: Physical education and sport in schools

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 10 October 2018: Physical education and sport in schools

As well as helping provide sports facilities, staff and volunteers at the school will receive information on how best to use the new facilities and equipment to help children get active. Whilst we want to help as many schools as possible, priority is given to those primary schools which currently have little or no outside space which can be used for P.E. or sports sessions. 43 The fund closed to applications on 24 March 2014 and there are no current plans for further funding rounds. 44 A written ministerial statement of 5 March 2015 outlined progress with the projects:
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07388, 19 December 2018: Language teaching in schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07388, 19 December 2018: Language teaching in schools (England)

During a March 2018 debate in Parliament, the Schools Minister, Nick Gibb, set out that the Government did not plan to introduce any new subjects at GCSE level during the current Parliament, although it was open to a BSL GCSE in the longer term. The bar on new qualifications was intended to allow schools a period of stability, following wide- ranging reforms to GCSEs that have taken place in recent years. 46 However, the Government has recently reversed this position. The Schools Minister stated that the Government was prepared to make an exception to the broader prohibition, and consider proposals for a GCSE in BSL more quickly than previously indicated, opening the door for a GCSE to be introduced ahead of 2022. 47
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6972, 13 March 2017: Faith Schools in England: FAQs

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6972, 13 March 2017: Faith Schools in England: FAQs

In a Westminster Hall debate on school transport in June 2015, the Schools Minister Nick Gibb expanded on the Government position: We believe that [local authorities] are best placed to determine how resources should be used in the areas that they serve and to balance the demands of a broad range of discretionary travel against their budget priorities. If we were to remove this discretion from local authorities’ responsibilities, it would hugely increase the number of eligible children at a substantial cost to the taxpayer. Therefore, it is much more practical and helpful to allow local authorities to continue to make these important decisions locally, but they still need to make the right decisions locally. 12
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07059, 30 March 2017: FAQs: Academies and free schools

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07059, 30 March 2017: FAQs: Academies and free schools

The governing body should be able to demonstrate how best value has been achieved and keep the cost of supplying the uniform under review. When considering how the school uniform should be sourced, governing bodies should give highest priority to the consideration of cost and value for money for parents. The school uniform should be easily available for parents to purchase and schools should seek to select items that can be purchased cheaply, for example in a supermarket or other good value shop. Schools should keep compulsory branded items to a minimum and avoid specifying expensive items of uniform e.g. expensive outdoor coats. 31
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6103, 2 March 2017: Sex and Relationships Education in Schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6103, 2 March 2017: Sex and Relationships Education in Schools (England)

8.3 Of the remaining responses there were 516 on whether the changes to the SMSC [spiritual, moral, social and cultural] standard are required to ensure the active promotion of fundamental British values and respect for other people. A significant number of respondents indicated that they disagreed with the proposed changes, but analysis of the related comments revealed that this was because of misunderstanding the effect or raising issues that were not part of the consultation. For example, some responses questioned the definition of the fundamental British values and requested that this be opened up for further debate; others maintained that the changes extend the equality agenda and will result in the marginalisation of Christianity; and others considered that the changes are not necessary, that the standards were only amended in January 2013, and that many schools are already doing this.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7070, 9 March 2017: Recent policy developments: Grammar schools in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7070, 9 March 2017: Recent policy developments: Grammar schools in England

achieved solely by increasing the PAN in line with the School Admissions Code. 14 In the case of community, foundation and voluntary schools, local authorities can also propose that a school’s premises be enlarged by following a streamlined statutory process set out in regulations. 15 Academies wishing to enlarge their premises need to seek approval from the Secretary of State, through the Education Funding Agency (EFA). They are not required to submit a formal business case to the EFA unless the expansion is very large scale or increases pupil numbers to 2,000 or more. Further information is contained in advice published by the Department for Education in March 2016, Making significant changes to an open academy. 16
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07236, 8 October 2018: Careers guidance in schools, colleges and universities

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07236, 8 October 2018: Careers guidance in schools, colleges and universities

But, though we published an inspiration vision statement in September 2013 and strengthened the statutory guidance to support schools and colleges in making this vision a reality, it is clear that many schools and colleges need additional support if we are to ensure every young person—regardless of background or location—receives the life-changing advice and inspiration that they need to fulfil their potential and succeed in life. That is a view supported by a number of respected contributors in this area, including OFSTED, the National Careers Council, the Sutton Trust, the Gatsby Foundation and the Education Committee, as well as many employers, sector experts, and schools and colleges themselves. […]
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8023, 5 June 2018: Safeguarding in English schools

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8023, 5 June 2018: Safeguarding in English schools

• More general information on how the TRA regulates teacher misconduct: Teacher misconduct: regulating the teaching profession. It is a legal requirement for employers to make a referral to DBS where they think the individual has engaged in conduct that harmed or is likely to harm a child, or where they think the person otherwise poses a risk to children. DBS will consider whether to bar the person. 62 Schools must also have procedures to make a referral to DBS if a person in regulated activity has been dismissed or removed due to safeguarding concerns or if they would have been had they not resigned. Failure to make a referral to DBS when the criteria is met is a criminal offence. 63 In substantiated cases, the designated officer should also review the circumstances with the case manager to determine if improvements to the school’s procedures could be made in order to prevent a similar event occurring again and to see if any lessons can be learned. 64
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8023, 5 October 2018: Safeguarding in English schools

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8023, 5 October 2018: Safeguarding in English schools

While local authorities play the lead role, Government guidance stresses that effective safeguarding requires collaboration between local agencies, and that everyone who comes into contact with children has a role to play in “identifying concerns, sharing information and taking prompt action.” 4 In line with this, a range of local agencies, including the police and health services, have a duty under section 11 of the Children Act 2004, to ensure that they consider the need to safeguard and promote the welfare of children when carrying out their functions. 5 This briefing sets out the role of schools within this wider safeguarding system, which is described in more detail the statutory guidance, Working together to safeguard children. It provides information on the safeguarding responsibilities of governing bodies, head teachers and individual staff; the inspection of safeguarding arrangements in schools;
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 8 January 2018: Technical education reforms

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7951, 8 January 2018: Technical education reforms

• substantial academic or applied and technical qualifications; • non-qualification activity, such as work experience; and • the study of English and maths where they do not hold a GCSE 9- 4 (reformed grading) or A*-C (legacy grading) in these subjects. 2 Under the 16-19 funding formula introduced in 2013-14, a single basic funding rate per full-time student, currently £4,000 for 16 and 17 year olds, is intended to fund a study programme of around 600 guided learning hours, regardless of where and what the student studies. 3 The formula also provides a number of funding uplifts, including for large programmes and disadvantaged learners, and an area costs adjustment.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06972, 6 June 2018: Faith Schools in England: FAQs

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06972, 6 June 2018: Faith Schools in England: FAQs

In a Westminster Hall debate on school transport in June 2015, the Schools Minister Nick Gibb expanded on the Government position: We believe that [local authorities] are best placed to determine how resources should be used in the areas that they serve and to balance the demands of a broad range of discretionary travel against their budget priorities. If we were to remove this discretion from local authorities’ responsibilities, it would hugely increase the number of eligible children at a substantial cost to the taxpayer. Therefore, it is much more practical and helpful to allow local authorities to continue to make these important decisions locally, but they still need to make the right decisions locally. 14
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