Top PDF House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 4 December 2018: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 4 December 2018: Adult further education funding in England since
2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 4 December 2018: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

5.5 FE maintenance loans The March 2017 Budget additionally announced that from 2019-20 maintenance loans like those available for higher education students would be provided to students on technical education courses at levels 4 to 6 in National Colleges and Institutes of Technology. It added that these loans will “support adults to retrain at these institutions.” 43 However, in its response to a consultation on FE maintenance loans in September 2016, the DfE stated that it needed to “consider the value for money case and fiscal position before taking any decision on the case for FE maintenance loans.” 44
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 13 June 2018: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 13 June 2018: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

2015-16, with the addition of funding for 24+ Advanced Learner Loans and the Employer Ownership pilots from 2013-14 onwards. 14 Box 3: Advanced Learner Loans From 2013-14, grant funding for leaners aged 24 and over studying at levels 3 and 4 (e.g. A-levels) was removed and replaced with Advanced Learner Loans. Initially, loans also replaced grants for apprentices aged 24 and over studying at level 3 and above. However, loans for apprentices were dropped from February 2014 onwards, in part due to low take-up, and higher level apprenticeships were instead made eligible for grant funding from the ASB. 15 Following an announcement at the Spending Review 2015 Advanced Learner Loans were additionally made available for 19-23 year olds studying at levels 3 and 4, and to learners aged 19 and over studying at levels 5 and 6. 16 The availability of loans does not replace the entitlement to full grant funding for learners aged 19-23 undertaking their first level 3 qualification. 17
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 7708, 20 March 2019 : Adult further education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 7708, 20 March 2019 : Adult further education funding in England since 2010

After the UK leaves the EU it will no longer receive European structural funding (of which the social fund is a part). In order to replace this funding, the Government has pledged to set up a Shared Prosperity Fund to “reduce inequalities between communities and help deliver sustainable, inclusive growth.” 20 In the short term, the draft Withdrawal Agreement would mean that the UK would continue to participate in the ESF until programmes end in 2023. The Government has additionally guaranteed to fund all European Social Fund projects that would have been funded by the EU under the 2014-2020 programme period in the event of no deal being reached. 21
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 21 April 2017: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 21 April 2017: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

2015-16, with the addition of funding for 24+ Advanced Learner Loans and the Employer Ownership pilots from 2013-14 onwards. 14 Box 3: Advanced Learner Loans From 2013-14, grant funding for leaners aged 24 and over studying at levels 3 and 4 (e.g. A-levels) was removed and replaced with Advanced Learner Loans. Initially, loans also replaced grants for apprentices aged 24 and over studying at level 3 and above. However, loans for apprentices were dropped from February 2014 onwards, in part due to low take-up, and higher level apprenticeships were instead made eligible for grant funding from the ASB. 15 The Spending Review 2015 announced plans to expand eligibility for Advanced Learner Loans to 19-23 year olds studying at levels 3 and 4, and to learners aged 19 and over studying at levels 5 and 6. 16 The availability of loans does not replace the entitlement to full grant funding for learners aged 19-23 undertaking their first level 3 qualification. 17
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 13 June 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 13 June 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

After emphasising the importance of the reforms to technical education, including the additional funding to implement them, the Minster then addressed the funding of the sector in general. She stated: The additional funding [for technical education] will benefit FE colleges, which provide most of the technical programmes, but many sixth-form colleges and some school sixth forms will also benefit. At a time when public finances are under considerable pressure, that represents a significant commitment to the 16-to- 19 age group, in the context of the wider pressures on finances. I will not spill out political rhetoric, but a strong economy is important and we have had some difficult decisions to make. Our commitment to maintain the 16-to-19 base rate for all types of advisers at current levels until 2020 is important. We have done that, but the Government will keep funding under consideration.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 7 November 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 7 November 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

After emphasising the importance of the reforms to technical education, including the additional funding to implement them, the Minster then addressed the funding of the sector in general. She stated: The additional funding [for technical education] will benefit FE colleges, which provide most of the technical programmes, but many sixth-form colleges and some school sixth forms will also benefit. At a time when public finances are under considerable pressure, that represents a significant commitment to the 16-to- 19 age group, in the context of the wider pressures on finances. I will not spill out political rhetoric, but a strong economy is important and we have had some difficult decisions to make. Our commitment to maintain the 16-to-19 base rate for all types of advisers at current levels until 2020 is important. We have done that, but the Government will keep funding under consideration.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 7019, 19 February 2020: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 7019, 19 February 2020: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

funding “only repairs around a quarter of the cuts that 16-19 providers have experienced since 2010-11.” It also noted that, unlike for schools, the settlement for 16-19 is only for one year, which, it said, is likely to mean that the sector continues “to suffer from financial uncertainty.” 52 David Hughes, Chief Executive of the Association of Colleges, welcomed what he termed “the first meaningful investment in further education for 16 to 19 year olds for more than 10 years.” He added that it was “not enough to reverse the decades of cuts, nor to properly stabilise the sector for the future, but it is a good start.” 53 The AoC also published a summary of the key points regarding the funding. 54
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 7393, 4 January 2019 : Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 7393, 4 January 2019 : Higher education funding in England

funding and student support in England from 2012/13. The estimated RAB rate on new loans was put at ‘around 30%’, but subsequently increased to ‘around 35%’ 25 then to 35%-40% 26 , revised upwards again to ‘around 40%’ 27 and later to ‘around 45%’. 28 These increases were largely due to changes in economic forecasts, particularly on earnings. 29 These less optimistic forecast reduce the expected cash value of repayments and or delay when they will be made. Other factors behind the increase in the RAB rate include the higher than expected level of average tuition fee loans, a change to the timing of repayment threshold uprating, lower assumed repayments from the extra students who start higher education because the numbers cap is lifted 30 and improvements to the Governments loan repayment model which is used to forecast repayments and hence calculate the resource costs of
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7905, 25 April 2018: Adult ESOL in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7905, 25 April 2018: Adult ESOL in England

The Controlling Migration Fund includes a local services fund worth £100 million (£25 million in each of the four years from 2016-17 to 2019-20), which councils in England can bid for funding from. The prospectus explaining how local authorities can access the fund makes clear that proposals for funding should demonstrate how they will benefit the resident community in the first instance. It also notes, however, that “legitimate migrants may be the focus of some projects, for example English language support.” 35 In response to a parliamentary question, the Minister, Robert Goodwill, additionally stated that local authorities had been encouraged to consider whether the fund could be used to “help with any short-term pressures as a result of recent arrivals of unaccompanied asylum seeking children.” 36
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Adult further education funding in England since 2010

Adult further education funding in England since 2010

apprenticeship funding will, in part, be provided via the apprenticeship levy, a charge set at 0.5% of any UK employer’s pay bill in excess of £3 million. By 2019-20, the Government estimates that the levy will generate over £3 billion of revenue per year, with £2.5 billion to be used for apprenticeships in England. More information on how revenue raised from the levy will be spent is available on the House of Commons Library blog at: Reforms in apprenticeship funding: where do we stand now?

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 5108, 23 May 2018: Home education in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 5108, 23 May 2018: Home education in England

Lord Storey: To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the status of flexi-schooling in terms of the school roll and pupil funding allocation. Lord Agnew of Oulton: Children who are educated at home can also be registered at school and attend school for part of the week. Such an arrangement is known as ‘flexi-schooling’. Schools are under no obligation to agree to such an arrangement, but some are happy to do so. Schools must enter a pupil on the admission register from the beginning of the first day that the pupil will attend the school; this will include a pupil who is flexi- schooled. Where a school has agreed to a flexi-schooling arrangement, the time a child spends being educated at home should be recorded as absence.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07388, 19 December 2018: Language teaching in schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07388, 19 December 2018: Language teaching in schools (England)

The response set out the following reasons a child might not be entered for the EBacc: The decision not to enter a pupil for the EBacc combination of subjects will need to be considered on a case by case basis by each school, and schools will need to take into account a range of factors particular to each pupil. These will include, for example, complex SEN; having spent significant amounts of time out of education; recently arriving in the country; and only being able to take a limited number of key stage 4 qualifications as significant additional time is needed in the curriculum for English and mathematics. We believe that no single factor should automatically exclude a pupil from entering the EBacc. 33
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House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7393, 1 July 2019 : Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7393, 1 July 2019 : Higher education funding in England

Pre-2015 reforms The Government made estimates of the percentage RAB rate on new loans from 2012 when it published proposals for changes to funding. These are discussed in some detail in Changes to higher education funding and student support in England from 2012/13. The estimated RAB rate on new loans was put at ‘around 30%’, but subsequently increased to ‘around 35%’ 25 then to 35%-40% 26 , revised upwards again to ‘around 40%’ 27 and later to ‘around 45%’. 28 These increases were largely due to changes in economic forecasts, particularly on earnings. 29 These less optimistic forecast reduce the expected cash value of repayments and or delay when they will be made. Other factors behind the increase in the RAB rate include the higher than expected level of average tuition fee loans, a change to the timing of repayment
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7393, 14 June 2017: Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7393, 14 June 2017: Higher education funding in England

least April 2021. An equality analysis was produced alongside the consultation response. 13 This looked at the impact on different types of ‘protected characteristics’ such as age, sex, disability and ethnicity. The Spending Review and Autumn Statement 2015 made some headline announcements about funding paid through the funding council, the extension of maintenance loans to part-time students and new loans for Master’s degrees. It also announced that the discount rate applied to loans would be reduced to 0.7% and set the spending totals for the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills which will eventually feedthrough to annual funding allocations for higher education.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 4 June 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 4 June 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

3.7 Returners Engagement Programme Pilot In November 2016, the NCTL launched a second pilot scheme to recruit returning teachers. Under the pilot, a package of support, including a bursary of £600 and a 2-4 week training course, was provided to returning teachers in maths, physics, and languages. Schools Direct lead schools, multi-academy trusts, and higher education institutions, among others, in the north-west and south-east were invited to become lead schools for the pilot. Lead schools were to be provided with grant funding and were responsible for coordinating the programme of support. They will receive a further payment upon employment of the returning teacher. The application round for the second cohort of the pilot closed on 20 February 2017.
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House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 04195, 7 December 2018 : School meals and nutritional standards (England)

House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 04195, 7 December 2018 : School meals and nutritional standards (England)

Some guidance for local authorities on the ECS is also available. Digital Economy Bill amendment During the Commons Committee Stage of the Digital Economy Bill 2016-17 , an Opposition amendment, New Clause 19, was tabled to, Kevin Brennan stated, “explicitly provide for councils to share benefit data with schools, thus allowing eligible children to be automatically enrolled to receive free school meals rather than having to apply.” 44 The Minister, Matt Hancock, spoke in favour of permitting, rather than requiring, this data sharing, and stated that existing provisions in the Bill clarified that local authorities could do this and facilitated further
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8151, 19 February 2018: Higher education tuition fees in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8151, 19 February 2018: Higher education tuition fees in England

Neither of the first two falls changed the overall upward trends, they were dips linked to changes in fees. Applicant numbers recovered more quickly after the introduction of variable fees in 2006. These figures provide no evidence that variable fees caused a major ongoing decline or downward shift in overall numbers of applicants or entrants to higher education in England. Similarly there is no evidence that those from ‘lower’ socio-economic groups or (deprived) areas with historically low levels of participation have been adversely affected by tuition fees. The proportion of students from these groups has increased over this period. A report from the funding council concluded that there have been substantial and sustained increases in participation among
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06103, 1 August 2018: Relationships and Sex Education in Schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06103, 1 August 2018: Relationships and Sex Education in Schools (England)

8.3 Of the remaining responses there were 516 on whether the changes to the SMSC [spiritual, moral, social and cultural] standard are required to ensure the active promotion of fundamental British values and respect for other people. A significant number of respondents indicated that they disagreed with the proposed changes, but analysis of the related comments revealed that this was because of misunderstanding the effect or raising issues that were not part of the consultation. For example, some responses questioned the definition of the fundamental British values and requested that this be opened up for further debate; others maintained that the changes extend the equality agenda and will result in the marginalisation of Christianity; and others considered that the changes are not necessary, that the standards were only amended in January 2013, and that many schools are already doing this.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 8 June 2018: School Sport in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 8 June 2018: School Sport in England

Single and small academy trusts and sixth form colleges were able to bid for funding through the Condition Improvement Fund, with guidance published by the Education and Skills Funding Agency stating that the HPCF “is intended to improve children’s and young people’s physical and mental health by enhancing access to facilities for physical activity, healthy eating, mental health and wellbeing and medical conditions, such as kitchens, dining facilities, changing rooms, playgrounds and sports facilities.” 33 In March 2018 the Education and Skills Funding Agency published the list of schools who had successfully bid for funding from the Condition Improvement Fund. £38 million will be provided for specific projects supported by the HPCF in 2018-19. 34 Local authorities, large multi-academy trusts and other bodies are not eligible to bid for the Condition Improvement Fund and instead receive School Condition Allocations (SCA). They will receive a direct allocation from the HPCF in addition to their normal SCA for 2018-19. 35 School
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07070, 15 May 2018: Grammar schools in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07070, 15 May 2018: Grammar schools in England

achieved solely by increasing the PAN in line with the School Admissions Code. 14 In the case of community, foundation and voluntary schools, local authorities can also propose that a school’s premises be enlarged by following a streamlined statutory process set out in regulations. 15 Academies wishing to enlarge their premises need to seek approval from the Secretary of State, through the Education Funding Agency (EFA). They are not required to submit a formal business case to the EFA unless the expansion is very large scale or increases pupil numbers to 2,000 or more. Further information is contained in advice published by the Department for Education in March 2016, Making significant changes to an open academy. 16
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