Top PDF House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 8577: 30 May 2019: The Post-18 Education Review (the Augar Review) recommendations

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 8577: 30 May 2019: The Post-18 Education Review (the Augar Review)
recommendations

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 8577: 30 May 2019: The Post-18 Education Review (the Augar Review) recommendations

government’s funding for disadvantaged students. 3.8 Ensuring those who benefit from higher education contribute fairly The report states that the income-contingent repayment system of student funding is misunderstood and should be better communicated - a new name is proposed the Student Contribution System. The Review panel said that more graduates should repay their loans in full over their lifetimes and recommended extending the repayment period for future students and effectively freezing the repayment threshold. These changes – with the reduction in fees – would apply only to students entering higher education from 2021-22 at the earliest: students starting before then would not be affected. The report also recommended reducing students’ in-study interest charges and capping graduates’ lifetime repayments.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 7484: 20 May 2019: Income inequality in the UK

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 7484: 20 May 2019: Income inequality in the UK

households. An IFS report explains: …the NLW is projected to have a very small impact on incomes right across the household income distribution, with incomes being affected by less than 1% at almost all percentile points. This is partly because household incomes are larger than individual earnings in most cases, partly because some of the gains from the NLW are captured by the exchequer in higher tax payments and lower benefit entitlements, and partly because gains from the NLW are much more widely spread across the income distribution than across the individual earnings distribution, with similar gains between the 20th and 60th percentiles. This reflects that those who benefit from the NLW have low hourly pay, but not necessarily low household incomes. For example, those paid less than the NLW who have a higher-earning partner may benefit from the NLW but have a household income sufficient to be in the top half of the income distribution. 30
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House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7393, 1 July 2019 : Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7393, 1 July 2019 : Higher education funding in England

Pre-2015 reforms The Government made estimates of the percentage RAB rate on new loans from 2012 when it published proposals for changes to funding. These are discussed in some detail in Changes to higher education funding and student support in England from 2012/13. The estimated RAB rate on new loans was put at ‘around 30%’, but subsequently increased to ‘around 35%’ 25 then to 35%-40% 26 , revised upwards again to ‘around 40%’ 27 and later to ‘around 45%’. 28 These increases were largely due to changes in economic forecasts, particularly on earnings. 29 These less optimistic forecast reduce the expected cash value of repayments and or delay when they will be made. Other factors behind the increase in the RAB rate include the higher than expected level of average tuition fee loans, a change to the timing of repayment
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 7393, 4 January 2019 : Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 7393, 4 January 2019 : Higher education funding in England

funding and student support in England from 2012/13. The estimated RAB rate on new loans was put at ‘around 30%’, but subsequently increased to ‘around 35%’ 25 then to 35%-40% 26 , revised upwards again to ‘around 40%’ 27 and later to ‘around 45%’. 28 These increases were largely due to changes in economic forecasts, particularly on earnings. 29 These less optimistic forecast reduce the expected cash value of repayments and or delay when they will be made. Other factors behind the increase in the RAB rate include the higher than expected level of average tuition fee loans, a change to the timing of repayment threshold uprating, lower assumed repayments from the extra students who start higher education because the numbers cap is lifted 30 and improvements to the Governments loan repayment model which is used to forecast repayments and hence calculate the resource costs of
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 0616, 31 July 2019 : Oxford 'elitism'

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 0616, 31 July 2019 : Oxford 'elitism'

Analysis of this data and A-level results 27 found that variation in results could only ‘explain’ part of the divergent entry rates across schools. Some schools with very similar results had very different entry rates. The top 30 performing state grammar schools had similar A- level scores to the top 30 independent schools and, based on results alone, expected Oxbridge hit rates would be higher in independent schools by less than half of one percentage point. The actual rate for these independent schools was 13.2% in 2006, well above the 7.5% for the top 30 grammars. Different indicators of A level performance might produce somewhat different outcomes, but the report noted a slightly larger gap when hit rates were compared to average A level points per exam entry. 28
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 0616, 9 January 2019: Oxbridge 'elitism'

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 0616, 9 January 2019: Oxbridge 'elitism'

Analysis of this data and A-level results 27 found that variation in results could only ‘explain’ part of the divergent entry rates across schools. Some schools with very similar results had very different entry rates. The top 30 performing state grammar schools had similar A- level scores to the top 30 independent schools and, based on results alone, expected Oxbridge hit rates would be higher in independent schools by less than half of one percentage point. The actual rate for these independent schools was 13.2% in 2006, well above the 7.5% for the top 30 grammars. Different indicators of A level performance might produce somewhat different outcomes, but the report noted a slightly larger gap when hit rates were compared to average A level points per exam entry. 28
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 8389, 5 April 2019: Returns to a degree

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 8389, 5 April 2019: Returns to a degree

ten years after one year after graduation £0 £10,000 £20,000 £30,000 £40,000 £50,000 Medicine & dentistry Veterinary sciences Engineering Economics Nursing Physics and astronomy Pharmacology, toxicology and pharmacy Architecture, building and planning Math. sciences Computing Subjects allied to medicine Chemistry Business and management Combined and general studies Politics Health and social care Geographical and environmental studies Languages, linguistics and classics Education and teaching Physical, material and forensic sciences Philosophy and religious studies Biosciences Technology History and archaeology Humanities and liberal arts Law Agriculture, food and related studies Psychology Sociology, social policy and anthropology English studies Communications and media Sport and exercise sciences Creative arts & design
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House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number Number 7096, 5 September 2019: Poverty in the UK: statistics

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number Number 7096, 5 September 2019: Poverty in the UK: statistics

17% 30% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% Keep house warm Keep up to date with bills Money to decorate home Replace broken electrical goods Home contents insurance Replace worn out furniture Money to spend on self each week Make savings of 10 pounds a month or more One week's holiday away from home not with relatives Have a warm winter coat Celebrations on special occasions Eat fresh fruit and/or vegetables every day Go to a playgroup at least once a week Go on school trip at least once a term Have friends round for tea or a snack once a fortnight Leisure equipment, e.g. sports equipment or a bicycle Hobby or leisure activity Attend organised activity once a week Outdoor space / facilities to play safely Bedrooms for every child aged 10+ of different gender One week's holiday away from home with family
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 06103, 11 July 2019 : Relationships and Sex Education in Schools
(England)

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 06103, 11 July 2019 : Relationships and Sex Education in Schools (England)

Teaching in this area needs to be sensitive so as not to stigmatise children on the basis of their home circumstances. […] Sexual identity and sexual orientation 1.30 It is up to schools to make sure that the needs of all pupils are met in their programmes. Young people, whatever their developing sexuality, need to feel that sex and relationship education is relevant to them and sensitive to their needs. The Secretary of State for Education and Employment is clear that teachers should be able to deal honestly and sensitively with sexual orientation, answer appropriate questions and offer support. There should be no direct promotion of sexual orientation.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 06103, 11 February 2019: Relationships and Sex Education in Schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 06103, 11 February 2019: Relationships and Sex Education in Schools (England)

Teaching in this area needs to be sensitive so as not to stigmatise children on the basis of their home circumstances. […] Sexual identity and sexual orientation 1.30 It is up to schools to make sure that the needs of all pupils are met in their programmes. Young people, whatever their developing sexuality, need to feel that sex and relationship education is relevant to them and sensitive to their needs. The Secretary of State for Education and Employment is clear that teachers should be able to deal honestly and sensitively with sexual orientation, answer appropriate questions and offer support. There should be no direct promotion of sexual orientation.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 1079, 6 February 2019: Student Loan Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 1079, 6 February 2019: Student Loan Statistics

during the year. Interest rates were only lower in 1993/94 and 2002/03. 29 30 31 The all-items RPI was -0.4% in the year to March 2009. The (then) current regulations stated that if an interest rate is to apply to these loans then this will be the rate for the year from 1 September 2009. 32 In the past the then Government stated that it had ‘no plans to abandon the consistent use of RPI in calculating interest on student loans’. 33 It subsequently decided that no interest rate (0%) was to apply to income contingent student loans in 2009/10. The small numbers of remaining mortgage-style loans were solely linked to RPI and hence their interest rate was -0.4%. 34 Having no interest on student loans does not affect monthly repayments of those with outstanding income contingent loans. Repayments are based on income, not the interest rate. The cut to 0% would slightly reduce the loan period/total repayments for those who completely paid off their loans in year, but this applies to any cut in interest payments. The impact on other borrowers will depend on how interest rates on student loans and hence RPI vary in future years. If inflation jumps up to above the long-term trend then any advantage they might have gained would be lost. 35 This effect could be reduced by the continued operation of the low interest cap.
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 5871, 13 August 2019 : Youth Unemployment Statistics

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 5871, 13 August 2019 : Youth Unemployment Statistics

307,000 men aged 16-24 were unemployed in April to June 2019, 30,000 more than a year ago. The unemployment rate for men of this age was 13.8%, up from 12.2% a year before. 195,000 women aged 16-24 were unemployed, down 18,000 from a year before. The unemployment rate for women aged 16-24 was 9.3%, compared to 10.3% a year before.

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House of Commons Library briefing paper : The forthcoming review of post-18 education and funding

House of Commons Library briefing paper : The forthcoming review of post-18 education and funding

PHOTO REDACTED DUE TO THIRD PARTY RIGHT OR OTHER LEGAL ISSUES... Change … Public costs?[r]

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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

The fourth area that my hon. Friend raised was planning policy. He described the imbalance between the number of sites in some areas compared with others, particularly in his county. The Government’s planning policy for Traveller sites confirms that our aims include that local planning authorities should make their own assessment of need for the purposes of planning and, working together with neighbouring authorities, identify land for sites. Local planning authorities should consider the production of joint development plans that set targets on a cross-authority basis to provide more flexibility in identifying sites. The policy is clear that local planning authorities should ensure that sites in rural areas respect the scale of, and do not dominate, the nearest settled community. In exceptional cases when a local planning authority is burdened by a large-scale unauthorised site that has significantly increased its need, and where the area is subject to strict and special planning constraints, there is no assumption that the authority has to plan to meet its Traveller site needs in full. 83 More recently, in answer to a PQ in April 2019, the junior housing minister, Heather Wheeler, reiterated that “all local planning authorities should identify the need for traveller sites and ensure that appropriate provision is made for the travelling community. 84
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

The fourth area that my hon. Friend raised was planning policy. He described the imbalance between the number of sites in some areas compared with others, particularly in his county. The Government’s planning policy for Traveller sites confirms that our aims include that local planning authorities should make their own assessment of need for the purposes of planning and, working together with neighbouring authorities, identify land for sites. Local planning authorities should consider the production of joint development plans that set targets on a cross-authority basis to provide more flexibility in identifying sites. The policy is clear that local planning authorities should ensure that sites in rural areas respect the scale of, and do not dominate, the nearest settled community. In exceptional cases when a local planning authority is burdened by a large-scale unauthorised site that has significantly increased its need, and where the area is subject to strict and special planning constraints, there is no assumption that the authority has to plan to meet its Traveller site needs in full. 83 More recently, in answer to a PQ in April 2019, the junior housing minister, Heather Wheeler, reiterated that “all local planning authorities should identify the need for traveller sites and ensure that appropriate provision is made for the travelling community. 84
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07972, 30 May 2018: Independent schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07972, 30 May 2018: Independent schools (England)

Department for Education advice on the Registration of independent schools provides more information. In particular, on the registration process, it states: The Secretary of State must decide whether the independent school standards are likely to be met before a school can be registered. Once an application for registration has been received, the Secretary of State must notify Ofsted of it and Ofsted must then inspect the institution and make a report to the Secretary of State on the extent to which the school is likely to meet the independent school standards upon registration. […] The Secretary of State will consider the report from Ofsted and any other evidence relating to the independent school standards which is available in coming to a decision. If the Secretary of State decides that the standards are likely to be met once the institution becomes registered as an independent school then it must be registered as such. 2
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House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 1078, 11 September 2019: Education spending in the UK

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 1078, 11 September 2019: Education spending in the UK

This paper retains the distinction between the terms for two reasons. First the education and training series only goes back to the late 1980s, while the education series goes back much further, even with some breaks in the series the concept remains the same. Second the education and training series is more consistent over the period it is available for. The spending data are regularly revised. These revisions can change the total figure, or move items of expenditure from one sub-function to another. The detailed breakdown by sub-function is only revised back five years. This presents a problem with consistency when trying to compile long-term series based on sub-functions and the authors warn against simply splicing one set of data with another pre and post-revision. The education and training series in this paper is therefore consistent for its entire length, other than the break in 2011-12 detailed below. The education series is not and although revisions are generally quite small, readers should be careful when drawing conclusions from this data, especially those based on small differences.
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 5108, 12 April 2019 : Home education in England

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 5108, 12 April 2019 : Home education in England

Education Act 1996 they do have a duty to make arrangements to identify children in their area who are not receiving a suitable education. 21 The DfE’s guidance for local authorities explains that, while the law does not assume that a child is not being suitably educated if they are not attending school full-time, it does require local authorities to enquire what education is being provided. 22 There are no detailed requirements as to how a system of oversight should work, and it is for each local authority to decide its approach. However, the guidance emphasises that a proportional approach needs to be taken and local authorities should not exert more oversight than is actually needed when parents are providing a suitable education. It recommends that an authority should ordinarily make contact with home educating parents on at least an annual basis so that it can reasonably inform itself of the suitability of the education provided. 23
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House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 07388, 18 September 2019: Language teaching in schools (England)

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 07388, 18 September 2019: Language teaching in schools (England)

Quality of language teaching As noted in section 2.1, the 2011 Ofsted report identified good teaching in two thirds of the lessons observed in primary school, with primary teachers’ subject knowledge and their teaching methods described as predominantly good. Some weaknesses lay in the assessment, and the monitoring and evaluation of provision, often because school leaders did not feel competent enough to judge language provision. The 2011 report stated that in many of the secondary schools visited, opportunities for students to listen to and communicate in the target language were often limited by many teachers’ unpreparedness to use it, and that teaching in Key Stage 4 was focused on achieving good examination results, but this did not always prepare students sufficiently for study at a more advanced level, post-16. However, teaching and learning were good in most of the post-16 providers visited, and the relatively small numbers of students on modern language courses achieved well. 11
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 07059: 18 June 2019: FAQs: Academies and free schools

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 07059: 18 June 2019: FAQs: Academies and free schools

The governing body should be able to demonstrate how best value has been achieved and keep the cost of supplying the uniform under review. When considering how the school uniform should be sourced, governing bodies should give highest priority to the consideration of cost and value for money for parents. The school uniform should be easily available for parents to purchase and schools should seek to select items that can be purchased cheaply, for example in a supermarket or other good value shop. Schools should keep compulsory branded items to a minimum and avoid specifying expensive items of uniform e.g. expensive outdoor coats. 36
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