Top PDF House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7436, 2 February 2017: Reform of support for healthcare students in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7436, 2 February 2017: Reform of support for healthcare students in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7436, 2 February 2017: Reform of support for healthcare students in England

Placing new nursing, midwifery and AHP students on the student support system will, in general, provide more living cost support for students during their studies, as the student support system is substantially more than the combination of means-tested and non-means-tested bursaries. However, these new arrangements would increase the time period of student loan repayments students have upon graduation. Concerns about the impact on participation could be mitigated by evidence that increases in fees in the wider higher education system did not have a detrimental impact on application numbers for university, including among lower income groups. In fact, statistics show that in the wider system students are now more likely to apply to university than they were in 2010. It is important to note that the policy would place nursing, midwifery and AHP students on the same student support system as the general student population. There is a built in protection for the lowest earners whereby loan repayments cease where earnings drop below £21,000.
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House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 8655, 12 September 2019: Funding for healthcare students in England

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 8655, 12 September 2019: Funding for healthcare students in England

2. Funding for nursing, midwifery and AHP degrees Since 1 August 2017 all new entrants to nursing, midwifery and other allied health professional (AHP) degrees have been funded by the standard student support package - students are eligible to apply for a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of fees and a maintenance loan to help with living costs. Students may also be eligible for other grants depending on their circumstances.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07020, 18 April 2017: Special Educational Needs: support in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07020, 18 April 2017: Special Educational Needs: support in England

This briefing provides an overview of the new system, the transitional arrangements, and how the new system differs from that which preceded it. It also includes a brief history of the movement towards reform that took place in the years preceding the 2014 Act. A consultation on the inspection by Ofsted and the Care Quality Commission of local arrangements to support children and young people with SEN, due to begin in May 2016, was carried out from October 2015 to January 2016. Ofsted and the CQC published a response in March 2016, which confirmed that inspections would begin formally in May.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07236, 24 February 2017: Careers guidance in schools, colleges and universities

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07236, 24 February 2017: Careers guidance in schools, colleges and universities

1.3 Jobcentre plus employment advisers: 14- 17 year olds In the Summer Budget 2015, the Government announced the creation of a new Jobcentre plus employment advisor role, working with schools and sixth-form colleges to help improve young people’s ability to find work. The new provision, aimed at 14-17 year olds, will start in Birmingham. It is intended to then expand to the wider Greater Birmingham and Solihull area, and subsequently more widely. 10 A measure to provide Jobcentre plus advisor support in schools across England to supplement careers advice, and provide routes into work experience and apprenticeships, had previously been announced alongside the Queen’s Speech in May 2015. 11 However, no legislative measure was included in the subsequently published Welfare Reform and Work Bill .
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6281, 3 April 2017: Support for postgraduate students in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6281, 3 April 2017: Support for postgraduate students in England

There are some exceptions to this rule for full-time students taking courses in medicine, dentistry, veterinary science, architecture, social work and undergraduate Initial Teacher Training (ITT). For further information see page 41 of Student Finance England’s eligibility guidance. 22 Students with an honours degree may also currently be able to access tuition fee loans for a part-time degree in engineering, technology or computer science. 23 In addition, in July 2016 it was confirmed that from 2017-18 the ELQ rules would be relaxed further to allow students starting part-time second degrees in the following STEM subjects to be eligible for tuition fee loans: subjects allied to medicine; biological sciences;
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06962, 31 March 2017: GCSE, AS and A level reform (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06962, 31 March 2017: GCSE, AS and A level reform (England)

In a Westminster Hall debate on AS levels and A levels in April 2013, the then Schools Minister, David Laws, explained why the Government were making the changes: ...We want to give students a better experience of post-16 study, ensuring they are studying for rigorous qualifications that will provide them with the right skills and knowledge to allow them to progress. Students currently start A-levels in September and then they immediately start preparing for examinations in January. They and their teachers have spent too much time thinking about exams and re-sitting them, encouraging in some cases a “learn and forget” approach. A student taking A-level maths would need to sit six exams: three papers for their AS-level, and three for their A2. The old rules allowed multiple re-sitting of those papers, so a student might sit some papers in January, and if they wanted to improve their grades they could re-sit them in June and again the following year, while sitting and then re-sitting their A2 papers. In 2010, 74% of maths A-level students re-sat at least one paper.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6962, 31 March 2017: GCSE, AS and A level reform (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6962, 31 March 2017: GCSE, AS and A level reform (England)

In a Westminster Hall debate on AS levels and A levels in April 2013, the then Schools Minister, David Laws, explained why the Government were making the changes: ...We want to give students a better experience of post-16 study, ensuring they are studying for rigorous qualifications that will provide them with the right skills and knowledge to allow them to progress. Students currently start A-levels in September and then they immediately start preparing for examinations in January. They and their teachers have spent too much time thinking about exams and re-sitting them, encouraging in some cases a “learn and forget” approach. A student taking A-level maths would need to sit six exams: three papers for their AS-level, and three for their A2. The old rules allowed multiple re-sitting of those papers, so a student might sit some papers in January, and if they wanted to improve their grades they could re-sit them in June and again the following year, while sitting and then re-sitting their A2 papers. In 2010, 74% of maths A-level students re-sat at least one paper.
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House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 07714, 1 February 2017 : The Family Test

House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 07714, 1 February 2017 : The Family Test

Answered by: Mr Duncan Smith | Department for Work and Pensions This test will be reviewed through the Social Justice Cabinet Committee, which I chair. We intend, and the Prime Minister intends, that it will have teeth. We want to see an improvement in family life and greater support for those who have to juggle care for their children, care for elderly relatives and work. Through that process we hope to improve their lives. 9

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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 07020, 8 February 2019: Special Educational Needs: support in
England

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 07020, 8 February 2019: Special Educational Needs: support in England

The Green Paper said that the Government would “remove the bias towards inclusion” and improve the range and diversity of schools so as to: give parents a real choice of school, either a mainstream or special school. We will remove the bias towards inclusion and propose to strengthen parental choice by improving the range and diversity of schools from which parents can choose, making sure they are aware of the options available to them and by changing statutory guidance for local authorities. Parents of children with statements of SEN will be able to express a preference for any state-funded school – including special schools, Academies and Free Schools – and have their preference met unless it would not meet the needs of the child, be incompatible with the efficient education of other children, or be an inefficient use of resources. We will also prevent
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House of Commons Library : Briefing Paper: Number 5108, 18 January 2017: Home education in England

House of Commons Library : Briefing Paper: Number 5108, 18 January 2017: Home education in England

As regards children with statements of SEN which name schools as the appropriate placement for a child but parents decide to educate such a child at home, it remains the local authority’s duty to ensure that the child’s needs are met through the provision made by the parents. The local authority can support parents financially in these circumstances under section 319 or section 19 of the Education Act 1996 (this would fall under either paragraph 18 or paragraph 20 of Schedule 2 to the School and Early Years Finance (England) Regulations 2012). In deciding how much support is needed, the local authority should be aware that, unlike schools, parents do not receive base funding from the public purse in support of SEN, and should not therefore be expected to pay £10,000 before they receive any support.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 1 March 2017: School Sport in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 1 March 2017: School Sport in England

The findings of this study have also highlighted challenges for the future of PE and sport in primary schools. To sustain the impact of the premium, schools have used it to invest in training for existing staff. However, a question remains over how to maintain this investment in CPD for new teachers entering the profession, once premium funding ends. Schools also raised issues related to sourcing good quality provision in their local area, and may need further support to robustly assess the quality of the provision available. The survey also found that monitoring and evaluation of the premium was not consistent and schools may require further advice and guidance to support them to first assess impacts and then put in place strategies for continuing quality improvement. 19
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7070, 21 June 2017: Grammar schools in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7070, 21 June 2017: Grammar schools in England

Responding to the debate Nick Gibb, Minister for School Reform, argued that it was important that funding continued to be channelled towards disadvantaged pupils and those with low prior attainment: Given that grammar schools select their intake on the basis of ability, they are by definition unlikely to have pupils who have attained poorly in the past, so they are unlikely to qualify for that element of the local funding formulas. The purpose of low prior attainment funding is to ensure that as many young people as possible leave school with the right knowledge and skills to be able to succeed in adult life and in modern Britain. For a strong economy and society, it is important that we continue to target funding towards pupils who are not on track to do that.
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House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7905, 22 January 2017: Adult ESOL in England

House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7905, 22 January 2017: Adult ESOL in England

…the additional funding for English language training will mean all adults arriving through the scheme anywhere in the UK will receive an extra 12 hours a week of tuition, for up to 6 months. This is in addition to the language support already provided by local authorities, which is accessed by refugees within a month of their arrival and will assist families to integrate into their new communities more quickly and make it easier for them to seek and obtain work. 30

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6103, 2 March 2017: Sex and Relationships Education in Schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6103, 2 March 2017: Sex and Relationships Education in Schools (England)

relationship with others. We believe that parents should retain the right to withdraw children aged 15 or under because they know their children best, but equally we know that the vast majority of parents would like their children to have access to sex and relationship education. For children whose parents do not talk to them about these issues, this could be critical in keeping them safe, especially given that a third of girls say that they have experienced unwanted touching. We are keen for the Government to support our proposed new clause 20. 16

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House of Commons Library: briefing paper : Number 06113, 11 February 2019: Apprenticeship Statistics: England

House of Commons Library: briefing paper : Number 06113, 11 February 2019: Apprenticeship Statistics: England

The Apprenticeship Grant for Employers of 16 to 24 year olds (AGE 16- 24) was introduced in February 2012, and provided £1,500 to small businesses hiring young apprentices. In 2013/14 advanced learner loans were introduced, and individuals aged 24 and over were required to take these loans to pay half of the cost of advanced level apprenticeships. This was the first time that apprentices were expected to contribute to the costs of their learning, and led to an 88% fall in the number of people aged 25+ starting an advanced or higher apprenticeship. In February 2014 the Skills Funding
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7049, 27 February 2018: Postgraduate loans in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7049, 27 February 2018: Postgraduate loans in England

1.154 Autumn Statement 2014 therefore introduces a new offer of income contingent loans for those under 30 years old wishing to undertake a postgraduate taught masters in any subject. These loans, of up to £10,000, are planned to be available from 2016-17 and will be repaid concurrently with undergraduate loans. The loans are designed so that, on average, individuals will repay in full, in recognition of the high private return to individuals, but they will beat commercial rates. The government will consult on the detail and will confirm the delivery plan. This is expected to benefit around 40,000 students, and enable around 10,000 more individuals to take advantage of the opportunity to undertake postgraduate study each year.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP 03052, 29 June 2017: Apprenticeships Policy in England: 2017

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP 03052, 29 June 2017: Apprenticeships Policy in England: 2017

Disclaimer This information is provided to Members of Parliament in support of their parliamentary duties. It is a general briefing only and should not be relied on as a substitute for specific advice. The House of Commons or the author(s) shall not be liable for any errors or omissions, or for any loss or damage of any kind arising from its use, and may remove, vary or amend any information at any time without prior notice.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6972, 13 March 2017: Faith Schools in England: FAQs

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6972, 13 March 2017: Faith Schools in England: FAQs

40. However, the Secretary of State continues to attach importance to the opportunity that many parents have to choose a school or college in accordance with their religious or philosophical beliefs, and believes that wherever possible, local authorities should ensure that transport arrangements support the religious or philosophical preference parents express. In many cases these schools may be more distant and therefore the provision of transport and/or training, and the avoidance of unreasonable expenditure on travel are encouraged. However, the department appreciates that this may be incompatible, for
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 13 June 2017: Initial teacher training in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 13 June 2017: Initial teacher training in England

In its February 2016 report, Training new teachers, the National Audit Office stated that the DfE had evidence of a link between bursaries and the number of ITT applications, but that this did not extend to the impact of bursaries on the number of trainees who go on to qualify and teach. 32 In its subsequent report, the Public Accounts Committee stated that it had not been persuaded that bursaries were delivering value for money and recommended that the Government should “evaluate properly, as a matter of urgency…, whether bursaries…lead to more, better quality teachers in classrooms, including whether the money could be more effectively spent in other ways, such as on retention measures.” 33 As noted in section 2.6 above, this call for more evidence on the effectiveness of bursaries was echoed by the Institute for Fiscal Studies in its 2016 report on the costs and benefits of ITT routes. 34
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7393, 14 June 2017: Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7393, 14 June 2017: Higher education funding in England

Subsidy elements of loans The earlier table gave BIS estimates of the face value of fee loans to English students and EU students studying at English institutions. Only part of the face value of fee and maintenance loans paid out in any one year counts as public expenditure. This is what the Government expects the subsidy element to be and is viewed as the permanent costs of the loan to the taxpayer. This system is known as resource accounting and budgeting (RAB) or accruals accounting and has been in place in the public sector for more than a decade. The subsidy element is calculated as the face value of loans made in any one year less the discounted or present value of future repayments. This can be thought of as the amount of money lent to students that the Government does not expect to get back. It is frequently expressed as a proportion of the value of loans, the so-called RAB charge.
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