Top PDF House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 07020, 8 February 2019: Special Educational Needs: support in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 07020, 8 February 2019: Special Educational Needs: support in
England

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 07020, 8 February 2019: Special Educational Needs: support in England

give parents a real choice of school, either a mainstream or special school. We will remove the bias towards inclusion and propose to strengthen parental choice by improving the range and diversity of schools from which parents can choose, making sure they are aware of the options available to them and by changing statutory guidance for local authorities. Parents of children with statements of SEN will be able to express a preference for any state-funded school – including special schools, Academies and Free Schools – and have their preference met unless it would not meet the needs of the child, be incompatible with the efficient education of other children, or be an inefficient use of resources. We will also prevent
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07020, 20 April 2018: Special Educational Needs: support in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07020, 20 April 2018: Special Educational Needs: support in England

Separate consultations were conducted on high needs funding. The national funding formula for schools and high needs, published by the Department for Education in September 2017, described how the Government intended to proceed following those consultations. Local authorities would receive high needs funding through a national formula derived from, among other factors, a basic unit of per-pupil funding for pupils in specialist SEN provision, historic spend, and also proxy measures such as population, school attainment, and numbers of children in bad health. More detail is provided in chapter 4 of the Policy Document.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07020, 18 April 2017: Special Educational Needs: support in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07020, 18 April 2017: Special Educational Needs: support in England

We received over 1,000 responses and there was strong support for our proposals for a high needs national funding formula. Over two thirds agreed that the principles on which we are basing our reforms are right, and a majority supported each of the proposed factors we set out for the formula. A significant concern raised during the first stage of the consultation was about how high needs pressures might be managed if a ring-fence was applied to the schools block. […] The limited local flexibility we are

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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 8561: 17 May 2019: Post-16 Special Educational Needs and Disabilities in England: FAQs

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 8561: 17 May 2019: Post-16 Special Educational Needs and Disabilities in England: FAQs

Some young people will be moving into employment or going on to higher education. Others will primarily require ongoing health and/or care support and/or access to adult learning opportunities. They may be best supported by universal health services and adult social care and support, alongside learning opportunities in the adult skills sector. For those who have just completed an apprenticeship, traineeship or supported internship the best option may be for them to leave formal education or training and either begin some sort of paid employment resulting from their work placement, or to access further support and training available to help them secure a job through Jobcentre Plus.
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House of Commons Library : briefing paper : number 07972, 28 June 2019 : Independent schools (England)

House of Commons Library : briefing paper : number 07972, 28 June 2019 : Independent schools (England)

Local authorities are required to ensure that children in their area with special educational needs (SEN) receive the support they need. The Children and Families Act 2014 provided for an overhaul of the system for identifying children and young people in England aged 0-25 with special educational needs (SEN), assessing their needs and making provision for them. The reforms to the system of support began to be implemented in September 2014, in a phased introduction planned to be completed in April 2018.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 8561: 17 May 2019: Post-16 Special Educational Needs and Disabilities in England: FAQs

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 8561: 17 May 2019: Post-16 Special Educational Needs and Disabilities in England: FAQs

The support provided by institutions commonly includes: signers, note- takers, specialist support workers for those with mental health problems or SpLD (e.g. dyslexia tutors who work on a one-to-one basis with students on writing skills), help with assessment such as exam access arrangements (e.g. supervised rest breaks, separate room, additional time allowance, sitting exams at home), lecture notes and handouts in alternative formats, use of computers and assistive software and advising on adjustments to teaching approaches.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 06103, 11 February 2019: Relationships and Sex Education in Schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 06103, 11 February 2019: Relationships and Sex Education in Schools (England)

8.1 The proposed changes made by these Regulations were subject to a six-week consultation from 23 June to 4 August. This resulted in 1462 responses. Of these 909 were in support of a campaign that claimed the effect of the changes would be, amongst other things, to: introduce new values; extend the equality agenda; discriminate against Christianity; and undermine religious freedoms. This is not correct. The fundamental British values are not new. They were defined in the government’s 2011 Prevent Strategy and have been part of the Independent School Standards since the beginning of 2013.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 08444, 20 February 2019: Off-rolling in English schools

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 08444, 20 February 2019: Off-rolling in English schools

Recent years, however, have seen concerns being raised that children are leaving school rolls in rising numbers, in particular as they approach GCSE level, because of pressures within the school system. It has been suggested that increased ‘off-rolling’ is taking place because of the impact of pupils who are likely to perform relatively poorly in their examinations on school performance measures, and because schools may be struggling to support children who need high levels of support, for example pupils with special educational needs. Off-rolling of this kind might involve children being excluded for reasons that are not legitimate, or parents being encouraged to home educate a child where they would not otherwise have chosen to do so.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6281, 3 April 2017: Support for postgraduate students in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6281, 3 April 2017: Support for postgraduate students in England

The number of bursaries available for postgraduate social work courses is capped and there is no guarantee that students who take up an offer of a place on a course will receive a bursary. Universities decide which students receive a bursary and send a list of names (a ‘capping list’) to the NHS Business Services Authority. Students will only be assessed for a bursary if they are on the list from their university and satisfy the other eligibility criteria. 28 Once a student is allocated a bursary place they

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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 7756: 12 June 2019: Carers

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 7756: 12 June 2019: Carers

The Scotland Act 2016 devolves responsibility for disability and carers’ benefits to the Scottish Parliament. The Scottish Government has introduced a Carer’s Allowance Supplement, backdated to April 2018. It is paid twice yearly and is calculated using the formula Jobseeker’s Allowance minus Carer’s Allowance, multiplied by 26 weeks. The increase is not clawed back elsewhere, and does not affect other benefits which remain reserved, including Income Support, tax credits and Universal Credit. The Scottish Government also plans to provide additional financial support for carers or more than one disabled child, from spring 2021.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08543: 28 June 2019: Children's social care services in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08543: 28 June 2019: Children's social care services in England

My hon. Friend the Member for Telford has an interest in early intervention. I assure her that, across Government, we are addressing the root causes of children’s needs early - be it by supporting children with alcohol-dependent parents or in families affected by domestic abuse, preventing young people from being drawn into serious violence, or investing in early years and children’s and young people’s mental health. Our “Working Together to Safeguard Children” statutory guidance is clear that local areas should have a comprehensive range of effective evidence-based services in place to address assessed needs early. The Government have also committed £920 million to the troubled families programme, which aims to achieve significant and sustained improvement for up to 400,000 families with multiple high-cost problems by 2020.
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 06103, 11 July 2019 : Relationships and Sex Education in Schools
(England)

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 06103, 11 July 2019 : Relationships and Sex Education in Schools (England)

relationship with others. We believe that parents should retain the right to withdraw children aged 15 or under because they know their children best, but equally we know that the vast majority of parents would like their children to have access to sex and relationship education. For children whose parents do not talk to them about these issues, this could be critical in keeping them safe, especially given that a third of girls say that they have experienced unwanted touching. We are keen for the Government to support our proposed new clause 20. 27

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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7857, 7 February 2019: Higher education student numbers

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7857, 7 February 2019: Higher education student numbers

UCAS breaks down some of its group entry rates by the ‘tariff’ level of different universities. There are three tariff groups; high, medium and low and these refer to average grades of students admitted. High tariff institutions where entrants have higher grades are generally considered more prestigious and harder to get into. This type of analysis therefore can shed light on a different aspect of widening participation. In 2018 only 2.7% of 18 year olds from England who were eligible for FSM at school got into one of these high tariff universities. The rate has increased over time from less than 1.5% in the period 2006 to 2010, but was still well below the 10.0% for the non-FSM group. The size of the relative gap has fallen over time; in 2006 the non-FSM group were almost six time as likely to go to a high tariff university and this fell to below four times as likely in 2015 onwards. However, the absolute gap has increased in recent years from six percentage points in 2012 to more than seven points in 2016, 2017 and 2018.
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 07091, 5 August 2019 : School inspections in England : Ofsted

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 07091, 5 August 2019 : School inspections in England : Ofsted

Ofsted is required to undertake routine inspections of qualifying schools at prescribed intervals. These are sometimes known as full section 5 inspections after the relevant section of the Education Act 2005, as amended. There are special arrangements for schools judged good or outstanding overall at their last full inspection – see S 2.2 below. From September 2019, section 5 inspections will report separate judgements on:

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House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 07388, 18 September 2019: Language teaching in schools (England)

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 07388, 18 September 2019: Language teaching in schools (England)

The majority of schools teach one or more of French, German and Spanish, but the Government does not promote the teaching of particular languages. In 2015, concerns were raised about the withdrawal of GCSE and A level qualifications in lesser-taught languages such as Arabic, Japanese and Polish. Following discussions between the Government and exam boards, qualifications in many of these languages were retained. Language learning in England is consistently poor when compared with foreign language learning in other countries, and there have been regular calls from industry and

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House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 8593, 21 August 2019: Support for students with mental health issues in higher education in England

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 8593, 21 August 2019: Support for students with mental health issues in higher education in England

A number of factors may be leading to the increase in the number of students reporting a mental health condition. One contributory factor is the rise in the number of young undergraduates - adults aged 16–24 today are more likely than previous generations of young adults to experience common mental health conditions. The 2017 IPPR report commented that “a large and growing proportion of people are choosing to enrol in undergraduate courses in the UK, with a majority falling within the age range in which there is an added risk of

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House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 07375, 18 September 2019: School buildings and capital funding (England)

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 07375, 18 September 2019: School buildings and capital funding (England)

On 28 February 2017, the DfE announced that £415 million of funding from the soft drinks industry levy would be allocated to schools in 2018-19 to “pay for facilities to support physical education, after-school activities and healthy eating.” It added that schools would be able to use the funding – referred to as the healthy pupils capital fund (HPCF) – to “improve facilities for children with physical conditions or support young people struggling with mental health issues.” 15

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 0616, 9 January 2019: Oxbridge 'elitism'

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 0616, 9 January 2019: Oxbridge 'elitism'

In the first half of the period there was a clear increase in the proportion of state school pupils entering Oxford. This increased from 43% in the early 1970s to 52% in 1981. The level at Cambridge was more erratic, varying between 45% and 50% for most of this period. The rate at both institutions fell noticeably in the mid-1980s. New definitions were brought in from 1986/87 and trends since then have been more stable. Cambridge overtook Oxford in 1988 and took a higher percentage of state school pupils in each subsequent year other than 2011. There was little change at either institution during the early/mid-1990s. Rates at both increased to more than 50% in the late 1990s and early part of this century. This increase has generally been sustained in recent years and both institutions saw record highs in 2017; 60.5% at Cambridge and 56.1% at Oxford. The absolute number of state school entrants peaked in 2002 at Oxford and 2008 at Cambridge. Increases in the number of ‘overseas and other’ entrants meant highs in maintained school percentages between 2010 and 2012 were not matched by highs in absolute numbers. To put these figures in context Independent school leavers made up 9.7% of young (<20) accepted home applicants to higher education via the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) in 2017. 23
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 07714, 1 April 2019: The Family Test

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 07714, 1 April 2019: The Family Test

Many of the responses to PQs describe briefly what the Family Test is and refer to guidance issued by DWP but provide little additional information. During the March 2019 debate on the Application of the Family Test, several Members expressed frustration at the Departmental responses to their Parliamentary Questions. Fiona Bruce said that the answers were inadequate and did not explain the actions taken by Departments to apply the Family Test. She also contested the argument, made in several Departmental responses, that the Family Test did not apply to the Department’s policy brief. 28
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 0616, 31 July 2019 : Oxford 'elitism'

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 0616, 31 July 2019 : Oxford 'elitism'

In the first half of the period there was a clear increase in the proportion of state school pupils entering Oxford. This increased from 43% in the early 1970s to 52% in 1981. The level at Cambridge was more erratic, varying between 45% and 50% for most of this period. The rate at both institutions fell noticeably in the mid-1980s. New definitions were brought in from 1986/87 and trends since then have been more stable. Cambridge overtook Oxford in 1988 and took a higher percentage of state school pupils in each subsequent year other than 2011. There was little change at either institution during the early/mid-1990s. Rates at both increased to more than 50% in the late 1990s and early part of this century. This increase has generally been sustained in recent years and both institutions saw record highs in 2018; 61.3% at Cambridge and 58.9% at Oxford. The absolute number of state school entrants peaked in 2002 at Oxford and 2008 at Cambridge. Increases in the number of ‘overseas and other’ entrants meant highs in maintained school percentages in 2017 and 2018 were not matched by highs in absolute numbers. To put these figures in context Independent school leavers made up 9.7% of young (<20) accepted home applicants to higher education via the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) in 2018. 23
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