Top PDF House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 7 November 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 7 November 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 7 November 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

The additional funding [for technical education] will benefit FE colleges, which provide most of the technical programmes, but many sixth-form colleges and some school sixth forms will also benefit. At a time when public finances are under considerable pressure, that represents a significant commitment to the 16-to- 19 age group, in the context of the wider pressures on finances. I will not spill out political rhetoric, but a strong economy is important and we have had some difficult decisions to make. Our commitment to maintain the 16-to-19 base rate for all types of advisers at current levels until 2020 is important. We have done that, but the Government will keep funding under consideration. As I said at the beginning of my remarks, my job will be to be a champion for the sector. Pre-16 school education is crucial in the success of students post-16, which is why pre-16 schooling must be a funding priority, but it does not end there. 71
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 13 June 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 13 June 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

The additional funding [for technical education] will benefit FE colleges, which provide most of the technical programmes, but many sixth-form colleges and some school sixth forms will also benefit. At a time when public finances are under considerable pressure, that represents a significant commitment to the 16-to- 19 age group, in the context of the wider pressures on finances. I will not spill out political rhetoric, but a strong economy is important and we have had some difficult decisions to make. Our commitment to maintain the 16-to-19 base rate for all types of advisers at current levels until 2020 is important. We have done that, but the Government will keep funding under consideration. As I said at the beginning of my remarks, my job will be to be a champion for the sector. Pre-16 school education is crucial in the success of students post-16, which is why pre-16 schooling must be a funding priority, but it does not end there. 67
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07070, 15 May 2018: Grammar schools in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07070, 15 May 2018: Grammar schools in England

transition funding so that schools do not suffer abrupt changes to their funding straight away. We fund all 16-to-19 providers for study programmes of 600 hours per year for full-time students. That is sufficient for a study programme of three A-levels plus one AS-level, and up to 150 hours of enrichment activities, over a two- year study programme. There should be no need to cut those extra-curricular activities, which are such an important part of a rounded school education. In addition, as has been mentioned, we have, in 2013-14, increased the rate for larger programmes of study. For students who are studying four A-levels, the school will receive an extra £400 per pupil, and for those who are studying five A-levels, the school will receive an extra £800. 89
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8151, 19 February 2018: Higher education tuition fees in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8151, 19 February 2018: Higher education tuition fees in England

There are three main elements of public spending on higher education – direct funding through the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) which covers both teaching and research, student maintenance grants and student loans. Higher fees from 2012 meant much less spending went on direct support and much more on publicly supported student loans. This mirrors the change in institution income shown earlier. Maintenance grants were abolished for new students from 2016 and, again, replaced with publicly supported loans. This section looks in brief at the shifting balance of public funding in recent years. More background and earlier figures can be found in the briefing papers HE in England from 2012: Funding and finance and Higher education funding in England.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7393, 14 June 2017: Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7393, 14 June 2017: Higher education funding in England

The 2012 changes in university funding directly affect teaching rather than research. Plans were set out for each year to 2014-15 soon after the 2010 CSR was published. The earlier table shows that recurrent funding for research broadly maintained its cash value up to 2014-15. The 2013 Spending Round kept the total resource (recurrent) science budget for 2015-16, which includes funding for Research Councils and other areas, at the same cash level as earlier years. Total capital funding for science was increased, partially reversing earlier cuts. 15
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7857, 7 February 2018: Higher education student numbers

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7857, 7 February 2018: Higher education student numbers

UCAS breaks down some of its group entry rates by the ‘tariff’ level of different universities. There are three tariff groups; high, medium and low and these refer to average grades of students admitted. High tariff institutions where entrants have higher grades are generally considered more prestigious and harder to get into. This type of analysis therefore can shed light on a different aspect of widening participation. In 2016 only 2.5% of 18 year olds from England who were eligible for FSM at school got into one of these high tariff universities. The rate has increased over time from less than 1.5% in the period 2006 to 2010, but was still well below the 9.5% for the non-FSM group. The size of the relative gap has fallen over time; in 2006 the non-FSM group were almost six time as likely to go to a high tariff university and this fell to below four times as likely in 2016. However, the absolute gap has increased in recent years from six percentage points in 2012 to seven points in 2016.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06154, 5 April 2017: 16-19 Bursaries for further education in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06154, 5 April 2017: 16-19 Bursaries for further education in England

Twelve thousand students, those in care, care leavers and those receiving income support, including the severely disabled, should in future all receive an annual bursary of £1,200 if they stay on in education—more every year than they ever received under EMA. I also propose that those most in need who are currently in receipt of EMA be protected. All young people who began courses in 2009-10 and who were told that they should receive EMA will still receive their weekly payments. Young people who started courses in the 2010-11 academic year and received the maximum weekly payment of £30 should now receive weekly payments of at least £20 until the end of the next academic year.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 17 October 2018: Initial teacher training in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 17 October 2018: Initial teacher training in England

undergraduate and postgraduate trainees on non-salaried routes can apply for funding under the standard undergraduate student support system. In addition, a range of bursaries and scholarships are available to some trainees, depending on the subject they are training in and, for postgraduates, the class of their first degree. For 2018-19 the Government is also piloting early-career retention payments for maths teachers. Under the scheme, eligible individuals will receive early-career payments of £5,000 each (£7,500 in some areas) in their third and fifth year of teaching in addition to a £20,000 bursary during their training.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 6 June 2018: Initial teacher training in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 6 June 2018: Initial teacher training in England

undergraduate and postgraduate trainees on non-salaried routes can apply for funding under the standard undergraduate student support system. In addition, a range of bursaries and scholarships are available to some trainees, depending on the subject they are training in and, for postgraduates, the class of their first degree. For 2018-19 the Government is also piloting early-career retention payments for maths teachers. Under the scheme, eligible individuals will receive early-career payments of £5,000 each (£7,500 in some areas) in their third and fifth year of teaching in addition to a £20,000 bursary during their training.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 19 January 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 19 January 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

In November 2016, the NCTL launched a second pilot scheme to recruit returning teachers. Under the pilot, a package of support, including a bursary of £600 and a 2-4 week training course, was provided to returning teachers in maths, physics, and languages. Schools Direct lead schools, multi-academy trusts, and higher education institutions, among others, in the north-west and south-east were invited to become lead schools for the pilot. Lead schools were to be provided with grant funding and were responsible for coordinating the programme of support. They will receive a further payment upon employment of the returning teacher. The application round for the second cohort of the pilot closed on 20 February 2017.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07091, 5 November 2018: School inspections in England: Ofsted

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07091, 5 November 2018: School inspections in England: Ofsted

As a result of the Education and Adoption Act 2016, regardless of the terms in an academy’s funding agreement, the RSC (on behalf of the Secretary of State) can terminate the funding agreement of an academy that has been judged inadequate. This is a power rather than a duty, meaning the RSC may decide to implement other measures to improve the school rather than terminate to bring about a change of trust, for example, where a change of academy trust would prevent the consolidation of improvements in a school […] When an academy’s funding agreement has been terminated because the academy has been judged inadequate, the RSC will usually identify a new academy trust to take on responsibility for the academy, and will enter into a new funding agreement in respect of that academy (this is sometimes referred to as ‘rebrokerage’ of the academy). If the academy that was judged inadequate was previously a ‘standalone’ academy, this will generally mean it will join a multi- academy trust (MAT). The academy will remain open, and the RSC and the new academy trust will work to ensure minimal disruption to pupils’ education during the transition. In some exceptional cases, where the academy is not considered viable in the long term, the RSC can move to terminate the funding agreement in order to close it. 8
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House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7393, 1 July 2019 : Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7393, 1 July 2019 : Higher education funding in England

After consultation the Government decided to freeze the repayment threshold for all post-2012 borrowers. The discount rate used for the public accounting of loans was reduced from 2.2% to 0.7%. These changes were expected to result in savings to current spending when grants are ended, and a substantial cut in the subsidy element of loans. On 1 October 2017 the Prime Minister announced a number of changes to these policies: The fee cap would be frozen in 2018-19, the repayment threshold would rise to £25,000 and a there would be a review of the student finance system. The Department for
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 21 April 2017: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 21 April 2017: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

The budget for Advanced Learner Loans is planned to increase from a 2015-16 baseline of £0.20 billion to £0.48 billion in 2019-20. The 2015-16 baseline is based on an estimate of the likely value of loans paid put in the year, which is £298 million less than the initial budget allocation set out in the skills funding letter. Whether the forecast increase in loan budgets result in an increase in loan funding provided to students depends in part, of course, on the future demand for loans (see box three above).

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House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 7393, 4 January 2019 : Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 7393, 4 January 2019 : Higher education funding in England

The Secretary of State writes to the funding councils around the turn of each year to set out funding, priorities, student numbers and related matters for the following financial year. Occasionally these letters cover more than one year and sometimes revised versions are published. The most recent funding letters for the Office for Students and Research England were published in February and March 2018 respectively. Funding for teaching 2018-19, research was for 2018-19 and indicative totals for 2019-20. Earlier funding letters from the mid-1990s onwards can be found at: http://www.hefce.ac.uk/funding/annallocns/Archive/ The following table summarises this
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7357, 21 May 2018: Further Education: Post-16 Area Reviews

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7357, 21 May 2018: Further Education: Post-16 Area Reviews

In July 2015, the National Audit Office (NAO) published a report on the oversight of financial sustainability in the FE sector. The report found that the “financial health of the…sector has been declining since 2010-11” and that “the number of colleges under strain is set to rise rapidly”. It further stated that “reductions and changing priorities in public funding”, along with a declining 16-18 population and increased competition from schools and colleges, had “combined to create a challenging educational and financial climate for many colleges”. The report recommended that decisions about whether to merge or close a college need to be “supported by good information on educational and skills needs in the area, and the capacity available to meet them”. 8
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 13 June 2018: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 13 June 2018: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

The budget for Advanced Learner Loans is planned to increase from a 2015-16 baseline of £0.20 billion to £0.48 billion in 2019-20. The 2015-16 baseline is based on an estimate of the likely value of loans paid put in the year, which is £298 million less than the initial budget allocation set out in the skills funding letter. Whether the forecast increase in loan budgets result in an increase in loan funding provided to students depends in part, of course, on the future demand for loans (see box three above).

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 4 December 2018: Adult further education funding in England since
2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 4 December 2018: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

Teaching and learning funding The funding letter set out a 2015-16 baseline for the AEB of £1.49 billion and stated that this will be maintained in cash terms in 2016-17. The indicative AEB for 2017-18, 2018-19 and 2019-20 will be held constant at £1.5 billion. Funding for apprenticeships is initially planned to increase from a 2015-16 baseline of £0.74 billion to £0.93 billion in 2016-17, before increasing further to £1.42 billion by 2019-20. It should be noted that from 2017-18 onwards apprenticeship funding has, in part, been provided via the apprenticeship levy, a charge set at 0.5% of any UK employer’s pay bill in excess of
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 7708, 20 March 2019 : Adult further education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 7708, 20 March 2019 : Adult further education funding in England since 2010

Teaching and learning funding The funding letter set out a 2015-16 baseline for the AEB of £1.49 billion and stated that this will be maintained in cash terms in 2016-17. The indicative AEB for 2017-18, 2018-19 and 2019-20 will be held constant at £1.5 billion. Funding for apprenticeships is initially planned to increase from a 2015-16 baseline of £0.74 billion to £0.93 billion in 2016-17, before increasing further to £1.42 billion by 2019-20. It should be noted that from 2017-18 onwards apprenticeship funding has, in part, been provided via the apprenticeship levy, a charge set at 0.5% of any UK employer’s pay bill in excess of
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House of Commons Library : Briefing Paper: Number 5108, 18 January 2017: Home education in England

House of Commons Library : Briefing Paper: Number 5108, 18 January 2017: Home education in England

Under the reformed system for special educational needs, where parents and the local authority agree that home education is the right provision for a child with an EHC plan, the plan should make clear that the child will be educated at home. If it does, then the local authority must arrange the special educational provision set out in the plan. Where a child’s EHC plan names a school and the parents decide to educate them at home, the local authority does not have to make the special educational needs provision set out in the plan provided that it is satisfied that the arrangements made by the parents are suitable. The authority must review the plan annually “to assure itself that the provision set out in it continues to be appropriate and that the child’s SEN continue to be met.” 33
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 5108, 12 April 2019 : Home education in England

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 5108, 12 April 2019 : Home education in England

Local authorities should, the guidance states, approach cases where the suitability of education is in doubt using powers under the Education Act 1996 (as set out above). It adds, however, that they should also be ready to “fully exercise their safeguarding powers and duties to protect the child’s well being” if a lack of suitable education appears likely to impair a child’s development. The guidance emphasises that a failure to provide suitable education is capable of satisfying the threshold that a child is suffering, or is likely to suffer, significant harm, but whether this is the case will depend on the particular circumstances of the case. Actions that a local authority could take include applying to the court for an education supervision order (giving the authority a formal supervisory role in the education of the child) or a care order under the Children Act 1989. Both of these give the local authority the right to contact with a child. The guidance emphasises that care orders must only be used as a last resort “in the most egregious cases of a failure to provide a suitable education, and a persistent refusal by parents to co- operate with the local authority.”
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