Top PDF House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07272, 2 November 2018: Summer-born children: starting school

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07272, 2 November 2018: Summer-born children: starting school

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07272, 2 November 2018: Summer-born children: starting school

Stephen Hammond, who secured the debate, praised the existing guidelines but raised concerns with how they were being applied in practice: First, although there is no statutory barrier to a child being admitted outside their normal age cohort, there is no right to insist or to appeal. Although the guidelines state that the rationale must be set out, they do not confer any extra rights. Secondly, some authorities allow delayed entry into education but then insist that the child begins in year 1, rather than in reception, thus removing all the hoped for benefit of starting a year later. Thirdly, some authorities, as I pointed out when describing the case in my constituency, allow a child to defer entry at primary level but give no guarantee that the child will remain in that cohort post- primary school. Finally, there are any number of similar problems for the parents of premature and pre-term babies. Some local authorities take no account of prematurity or the due date. 19
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Summer-born children: starting school.
Briefing paper: number 07272, 4 October 2016

Summer-born children: starting school. Briefing paper: number 07272, 4 October 2016

Stephen Hammond, who secured the debate, praised the existing guidelines but raised concerns with how they were being applied in practice: First, although there is no statutory barrier to a child being admitted outside their normal age cohort, there is no right to insist or to appeal. Although the guidelines state that the rationale must be set out, they do not confer any extra rights. Secondly, some authorities allow delayed entry into education but then insist that the child begins in year 1, rather than in reception, thus removing all the hoped for benefit of starting a year later. Thirdly, some authorities, as I pointed out when describing the case in my constituency, allow a child to defer entry at primary level but give no guarantee that the child will remain in that cohort post- primary school. Finally, there are any number of similar problems for the parents of premature and pre-term babies. Some local authorities take no account of prematurity or the due date. 19
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07091, 5 November 2018: School inspections in England: Ofsted

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07091, 5 November 2018: School inspections in England: Ofsted

In oral evidence to the Committee on 27 June 2018, Education Secretary Damian Hinds MP said he thought it was: [L]egitimate—more than legitimate, I think that it is important—to be able to know, for parents and for others, what the effect and the value of the different multi-academy trusts is. As to how you do that, I think that it would be wrong to come to an immediate decision, so I have said I will work with the sector to understand what the best way to go about it is, and which body or bodies are required and are best placed to make those assessments. 34

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP08198, 10 January 2018: Advertising to children

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP08198, 10 January 2018: Advertising to children

Advergames by food companies already have to stick to strict rules and we’ve banned those that promoted overeating. For example, we upheld a complaint from the Children’s Food Campaign (CFC) that a ‘Cola Capers’ game on a confectionary manufacturer’s website irresponsibly encouraged poor nutritional habits and an unhealthy lifestyle in children. We also found that the use of cartoon characters popular with and targeted at primary-school children, to promote foods other than fresh fruit and vegetables was in breach of the rules. We will not hesitate to ban any others that take this approach.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 04195, 8 November 2018: School meals and nutritional standards (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 04195, 8 November 2018: School meals and nutritional standards (England)

The Resolution Foundation considered the FSM eligibility issue in a blog post published on 11 January 2018: So far all families [on Universal Credit] are entitled – because very few working families with children are in the system. Rather than massively expand or severely curtail Free School Meals the government proposes a compromise. It will broadly maintain the status quo with an earnings threshold similar to the tax credit cut off point. But doing so creates an effective £11 a week loss of income when crossing the threshold, and it takes £30 of earnings to claw it back given the UC taper. In reality relatively few will find themselves faced with this cliff-edge. However, a core tenet of UC – that it will always pay to work more – has been sacrificed. 20
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 8 June 2018: School Sport in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 8 June 2018: School Sport in England

Single and small academy trusts and sixth form colleges were able to bid for funding through the Condition Improvement Fund, with guidance published by the Education and Skills Funding Agency stating that the HPCF “is intended to improve children’s and young people’s physical and mental health by enhancing access to facilities for physical activity, healthy eating, mental health and wellbeing and medical conditions, such as kitchens, dining facilities, changing rooms, playgrounds and sports facilities.” 33 In March 2018 the Education and Skills Funding Agency published the list of schools who had successfully bid for funding from the Condition Improvement Fund. £38 million will be provided for specific projects supported by the HPCF in 2018-19. 34 Local authorities, large multi-academy trusts and other bodies are not eligible to bid for the Condition Improvement Fund and instead receive School Condition Allocations (SCA). They will receive a direct allocation from the HPCF in addition to their normal SCA for 2018-19. 35 School
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06798, 16 April 2018: The school curriculum in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06798, 16 April 2018: The school curriculum in England

comprehensive account of its early history can be found in the 2009 report of the Children, Schools and Families Select Committee, National Curriculum. 9 1987 – the Department of Education and Science, led by Kenneth Baker MP, issued a consultation document setting out the rationale for a national curriculum. This identified four broad underlying principles and intentions: establishing an entitlement to a broad and balanced

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08414, 9 October 2018: School uniform costs in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08414, 9 October 2018: School uniform costs in England

secondary school – an increase of 7% or £24 since 2015. Parents of primary school children spent on average £255, an increase of 2% since 2015. […] The high cost of uniforms can be put down in part to school policies that make parents buy clothing from specialist shops rather than giving them the choice of buying items at cheaper stores such as supermarkets or high-street chains. Where parents have to buy two or more items of school uniform from a specific supplier, spending was found to be an average of £71 per year higher for secondary school children and £77 higher for primary school children.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07091, 18 April 2018: School inspections in England: Ofsted

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07091, 18 April 2018: School inspections in England: Ofsted

In response to a PQ of 10 November 2017, then-Education Secretary Justine Greening said that the Government had no plans to allow Ofsted to inspect whole MATs at this time, but that the DfE was “working with Ofsted to develop new approaches to better scrutinise MATs, and the legal framework already has sufficient provisions to take this forward. We will publish details in due course”. 21

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6700, 17 April 2018: The Pupil Premium

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6700, 17 April 2018: The Pupil Premium

support to raise the standard of attainment for the eligible pupils. 11 Looked after children Virtual school heads are responsible for managing Pupil Premium funding for children currently looked after by the local authority and for allocating it to schools and alternative provision settings. They can pass on the full funding received in respect of a child to the relevant school or alternative provider, but are not required to do so. For example, some funding can be pooled to pay for activities that will benefit a group of or all of an

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 04195, 8 February 2018: School meals and nutritional standards (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 04195, 8 February 2018: School meals and nutritional standards (England)

The Resolution Foundation considered the FSM eligibility issue in a blog post published on 11 January 2018: So far all families [on Universal Credit] are entitled – because very few working families with children are in the system. Rather than massively expand or severely curtail Free School Meals the government proposes a compromise. It will broadly maintain the status quo with an earnings threshold similar to the tax credit cut off point. But doing so creates an effective £11 a week loss of income when crossing the threshold, and it takes £30 of earnings to claw it back given the UC taper. In reality relatively few will find themselves faced with this cliff-edge. However, a core tenet of UC – that it will always pay to work more – has been sacrificed. 18
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House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 04195, 7 December 2018 : School meals and nutritional standards (England)

House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 04195, 7 December 2018 : School meals and nutritional standards (England)

The Resolution Foundation considered the FSM eligibility issue in a blog post published on 11 January 2018: So far all families [on Universal Credit] are entitled – because very few working families with children are in the system. Rather than massively expand or severely curtail Free School Meals the government proposes a compromise. It will broadly maintain the status quo with an earnings threshold similar to the tax credit cut off point. But doing so creates an effective £11 a week loss of income when crossing the threshold, and it takes £30 of earnings to claw it back given the UC taper. In reality relatively few will find themselves faced with this cliff-edge. However, a core tenet of UC – that it will always pay to work more – has been sacrificed. 20
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 04195, 21 November 2017: School meals and nutritional standards (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 04195, 21 November 2017: School meals and nutritional standards (England)

Some guidance for local authorities on the ECS is also available. Digital Economy Bill amendment During the Commons Committee Stage of the Digital Economy Bill 2016-17 , an Opposition amendment, New Clause 19, was tabled to, Kevin Brennan stated, “explicitly provide for councils to share benefit data with schools, thus allowing eligible children to be automatically enrolled to receive free school meals rather than having to apply.” 30 The Minister, Matt Hancock, spoke in favour of permitting, rather than requiring, this data sharing, and stated that existing provisions in the Bill clarified that local authorities could do this and facilitated further
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 5108, 23 May 2018: Home education in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 5108, 23 May 2018: Home education in England

Local authorities have no statutory duties in relation to monitoring the quality of home education on a routine basis. However, they do have duties to make arrangements to identify children not receiving a suitable education, and to intervene if it appears that they are not. Intervention could, for example, take the form of issuing a school attendance order, although Government guidance on home education encourages authorities to address the issue informally before serving such a notice. As part of their safeguarding duties local authorities have powers to insist on seeing a child to enquire about their welfare where there are grounds for concern, but this does not extend to seeing and questioning children for the purpose of establishing whether they are receiving a suitable education.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8023, 5 June 2018: Safeguarding in English schools

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8023, 5 June 2018: Safeguarding in English schools

• More general information on how the TRA regulates teacher misconduct: Teacher misconduct: regulating the teaching profession. It is a legal requirement for employers to make a referral to DBS where they think the individual has engaged in conduct that harmed or is likely to harm a child, or where they think the person otherwise poses a risk to children. DBS will consider whether to bar the person. 62 Schools must also have procedures to make a referral to DBS if a person in regulated activity has been dismissed or removed due to safeguarding concerns or if they would have been had they not resigned. Failure to make a referral to DBS when the criteria is met is a criminal offence. 63 In substantiated cases, the designated officer should also review the circumstances with the case manager to determine if improvements to the school’s procedures could be made in order to prevent a similar event occurring again and to see if any lessons can be learned. 64
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8023, 5 October 2018: Safeguarding in English schools

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8023, 5 October 2018: Safeguarding in English schools

It is a legal requirement for employers to make a referral to DBS where they think the individual has engaged in conduct that harmed or is likely to harm a child, or where they think the person otherwise poses a risk to children. DBS will consider whether to bar the person. 76 Schools must also have procedures to make a referral to DBS if a person in regulated activity has been dismissed or removed due to safeguarding concerns or if they would have been had they not resigned. Failure to make a referral to DBS when the criteria is met is a criminal offence. 77 In substantiated cases, the designated officer should also review the circumstances with the case manager to determine if improvements to the school’s procedures could be made in order to prevent a similar event occurring again and to see if any lessons can be learned. 78
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07972, 30 May 2018: Independent schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07972, 30 May 2018: Independent schools (England)

Generally speaking, the parents of children with SEN are responsible for funding their children’s education if they choose to send them to fee- paying schools. Parents may request a particular school is ‘named’ for their child to attend as part of an Education, Health and Care Plan. Local authorities must agree that request unless the school is unsuitable, or the

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07070, 15 May 2018: Grammar schools in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07070, 15 May 2018: Grammar schools in England

Expanded free school transport for grammar pupils The Budget document stated: The government wants to ensure that children from disadvantaged backgrounds have every opportunity to access the best possible education, without the cost of transport acting as a barrier. Pupils typically travel nearly three times as far to attend selective schools. The government is therefore expanding the current ‘extended rights’ entitlement for children aged 11 to 16, who receive free school meals or whose parents claim Maximum Working Tax Credit. They will now get free transport to attend the nearest selective school in their area, bringing it in line with free transport provision for those travelling to their nearest school on faith or belief grounds. 42
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 7 November 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 7 November 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

After emphasising the importance of the reforms to technical education, including the additional funding to implement them, the Minster then addressed the funding of the sector in general. She stated: The additional funding [for technical education] will benefit FE colleges, which provide most of the technical programmes, but many sixth-form colleges and some school sixth forms will also benefit. At a time when public finances are under considerable pressure, that represents a significant commitment to the 16-to- 19 age group, in the context of the wider pressures on finances. I will not spill out political rhetoric, but a strong economy is important and we have had some difficult decisions to make. Our commitment to maintain the 16-to-19 base rate for all types of advisers at current levels until 2020 is important. We have done that, but the Government will keep funding under consideration.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper:  Number 07819, 8 March 2018: Constituency casework: schools in Scotland

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 07819, 8 March 2018: Constituency casework: schools in Scotland

The Scottish Government guide to Choosing a School states that: If you have a child who is due to start primary school or who will be transferring to secondary school soon, your council will probably suggest that you should use the local school designated by them. Of course most people are happy to do so, but the council must also tell you of your right to choose a different school. It can give you a contact address where you can get information to help in making up your mind. If you write to a council and request a place in a particular school, this is known as a placing request. The council has a duty to grant such a request wherever possible. However, the size of the school, the current roll and number of children who already live in the catchment area and other factors will affect the council's ability to grant a placing request. 9
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