Top PDF House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number Number 7096, 5 September 2019: Poverty in the UK: statistics

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number Number 7096, 5 September 2019: Poverty in the UK: statistics

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number Number 7096, 5 September 2019: Poverty in the UK: statistics

Keep house warm Keep up to date with bills Money to decorate home Replace broken electrical goods Home contents insurance Replace worn out furniture Money to spend on self each week Make savings of 10 pounds a month or more One week's holiday away from home not with relatives Have a warm winter coat Celebrations on special occasions Eat fresh fruit and/or vegetables every day Go to a playgroup at least once a week Go on school trip at least once a term Have friends round for tea or a snack once a fortnight Leisure equipment, e.g. sports equipment or a bicycle Hobby or leisure activity Attend organised activity once a week Outdoor space / facilities to play safely Bedrooms for every child aged 10+ of different gender One week's holiday away from home with family
Show more

46 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7096, 31 August 2018: Poverty in the UK: statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7096, 31 August 2018: Poverty in the UK: statistics

Previously, the proportion of people in relative low income fell between 2009/10 and 2010/11, both on a BHC and AHC basis. This was because there was a larger decrease in real incomes for households at the middle of the income distribution than for households at the bottom, and the relative low income threshold moves in line with median income. This decrease in median income between 2009/10 and 2010/11 reflected a decrease in real median earnings. Benefit and tax credit income, on the other hand, fell only slightly in real terms meaning that poor households in receipt of benefits and tax credits saw a smaller fall in their real incomes than was the case for middle-income households. One group which did not experience a reduction in relative low income following the 2008 economic downturn was working-age adults without children. However, this group is less likely to be in receipt of benefits than pensioners or families with children. 5
Show more

43 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 0796, 2 May 2017: Poverty in the UK: statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 0796, 2 May 2017: Poverty in the UK: statistics

21 indicators are used to assess material deprivation among families with children, covering access to different goods and services. The indicators were selected using various analytical techniques to determine the best discriminators between those families that are deprived and those that are not. In the Family Resources Survey , from which the poverty estimates are derived, respondents are asked whether they have each item and, if not, whether this is because they do not want them or cannot afford them. The questions are reviewed regularly to ensure they remain relevant.

37 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 7096: 2 July 2019: Poverty in the UK: statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 7096: 2 July 2019: Poverty in the UK: statistics

judgement about what constitutes minimum needs. Successive governments have argued there is no single, objective way of determining what constitutes a minimum acceptable income for a particular person or family, although independent researchers have made a number of attempts. Section 2 of Library Research Paper 13/1, Welfare Benefits Uprating Bill, 2013 , gives an overview of the debate. One such attempt is a major annual research project funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, which estimates Minimum Income Standards (MIS) for different household types in the UK. This involves in- depth consultation with members of the public, combined with expert knowledge, to identify the level of income required to meet a minimum acceptable standard of living: “having what you need in order to have the opportunities and choices necessary to participate in society.” The first findings were published in 2008 and are updated each year. 38
Show more

43 Read more

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number CBP 7976, 26 September 2019 : International and EU students in higher education in the UK FAQs

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number CBP 7976, 26 September 2019 : International and EU students in higher education in the UK FAQs

Over the last decade a number of universities have opened branch campuses. A very well known example for the UK has been the University of Nottingham campus in Ningbo, China and in Semenyih. Malaysia. Manchester Business School and Middlesex University are other notable players, as well as Lancaster and Strathclyde universities that signed agreements in May 2009 to establish campuses in Pakistan. Aberystwyth University followed Middlesex University in opening a campus in Mauritius in 2014. The University of Liverpool and Xi’an Jiaotong University in China formed a partnership for setting up Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University (XJTLU), an independent university based in Suzhou, Jiangsu, China. The UK’s existing and currently planned branch campuses are concentrated quite heavily in the UAE, China, Malaysia and Singapore, though single campuses have been established in less well known locations such as Uzbekistan (Westminster). 8
Show more

22 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 0616, 9 January 2019: Oxbridge 'elitism'

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 0616, 9 January 2019: Oxbridge 'elitism'

In July 2012 The Department for Education released new ‘experimental’ statistics which looked at the destination of A level students the year after they took their qualifications. The data identify those in higher education and within this those in any Russell Group university and those at Oxford or Cambridge. The information is taken from matching National Pupil Database records to those held by the Higher Education Statistics Agency. It only includes young people who studied at state sector schools or colleges in England. Information is broken down by region, local authority, individual (state) school or college and, more recently, student characteristics. The data now covers the period up to 2017 and can be found at can be found at: Destinations of Key Stage 4 and Key Stage 5 pupils.
Show more

12 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 7484: 20 May 2019: Income inequality in the UK

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 7484: 20 May 2019: Income inequality in the UK

A couple without children with disposable income below £251 per week, before housing costs, would have been in the 10% of people with the lowest household incomes in 2017/18. To be in the highest-income 10% required an income just under four times higher, of at least £998 per week. The statistics typically make adjustment for the number of people in the household (because this affects how much income the household needs in order to experience a given standard of living) so the thresholds are higher for larger households.

26 Read more

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 0616, 31 July 2019 : Oxford 'elitism'

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 0616, 31 July 2019 : Oxford 'elitism'

In July 2012 The Department for Education released new ‘experimental’ statistics which looked at the destination of A level students the year after they took their qualifications. The data identify those in higher education and within this those in any Russell Group university and those at Oxford or Cambridge. The information is taken from matching National Pupil Database records to those held by the Higher Education Statistics Agency. It only includes young people who studied at state sector schools or colleges in England. Information is broken down by region, local authority, individual (state) school or college and, more recently, student characteristics. The data now covers the period up to 2017 and can be found at can be found at: Destinations of Key Stage 4 and Key Stage 5 pupils.
Show more

12 Read more

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 07091, 5 August 2019 : School inspections in England : Ofsted

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 07091, 5 August 2019 : School inspections in England : Ofsted

Ofsted is required to undertake routine inspections of qualifying schools at prescribed intervals. These are sometimes known as full section 5 inspections after the relevant section of the Education Act 2005, as amended. There are special arrangements for schools judged good or outstanding overall at their last full inspection – see S 2.2 below. From September 2019, section 5 inspections will report separate judgements on:

21 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7049, 29 January 2019: Postgraduate loans in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7049, 29 January 2019: Postgraduate loans in England

One assumption to which our findings are sensitive is that of repayment compliance. In 2012/13, 13.5% of new postgraduate students in the UK were EU domiciled. If the same proportion of EU students took out loans, but the government were unable to collect any repayments from these students, we estimate that the RAB charge would increase to 12.6%. This is another important consideration for the policy consultation.

19 Read more

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 8655, 12 September 2019: Funding for healthcare students in England

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 8655, 12 September 2019: Funding for healthcare students in England

The UCAS data covers full-time undergraduates only. Information from the Higher Education Statistics Agency covers all full- and part-time students. Their latest data are for academic year 2017/18, the first after the new funding rules were introduced. The total number of first year students from England studying nursing at UK universities fell by 13% from 49,600 to 43,200. The fall was larger among part-time students at 18% compared with 8% among full-timers. 6

18 Read more

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 07375, 18 September 2019: School buildings and capital funding (England)

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 07375, 18 September 2019: School buildings and capital funding (England)

Multi-academy trusts (MATs) with at least 5 academies and more than 3,000 pupils receive a capital funding allocation to deploy across their estate, designed to address their priority maintenance and expansion needs. This funding is provided by the Education and Skills Funding Agency to keep school buildings in good condition so pupils can learn in a safe and effective environment. 14

15 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 1079, 6 February 2019: Student Loan Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 1079, 6 February 2019: Student Loan Statistics

confirmed the earlier announcements about loan interest rates, thresholds, timing of repayments etc. and gave more detail about certain exceptions and repayments from non-UK residents. They introduced the terms ‘standard interest rate’ for the element linked to RPI and ‘additional interest rate’ for the variable element paid on top of this for those earning between the lower and higher interest thresholds. Borrowers earning above the higher interest threshold pay the standard rate plus 3%, as do those still studying or who have not reached their Repayment Due Date (April after the end of their course).
Show more

37 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 5440: 12 June 2019: Higher Education Finance Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 5440: 12 June 2019: Higher Education Finance Statistics

Between 1994/95 and 2002/03 the number of full-time academic staff at UK HEIs increased by 18% and the number of part time staff by almost 120%. The total headcount increased by 28% and there were above average increases in the number of academics working in research only (not teaching) and in the number of professors, and (non senior) researchers. However, full-timers and academics involved in teaching at least part of the time were still in the majority in 2002/03. More detail is given in Table 4 at the end of this note. The headcount number can obscure some trends in the balance between full- and part-time staff, but it was all that was published at the time. The increase in academic staff headcount over this period was slightly higher than the increase in full-time equivalent student numbers, 29 but much of the growth in staff
Show more

23 Read more

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 1078, 11 September 2019: Education spending in the UK

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 1078, 11 September 2019: Education spending in the UK

The chronological order of this series can be difficult to follow through all its loops over time. The charts opposite give the same data, but highlight one decade at a time. If time is cut up this way then it is clear that the 1950s and 1960s saw the share of national income devoted to education increase at a faster rate than the (increasing population). This continued into the first half of the 1970s, but was reversed in the second half. During the 1980s the population aged 5-19 fell consistently and education spending as a % of GDP fell at a similar rate.

24 Read more

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 5871, 10 September 2019: Youth Unemployment Statistics

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 5871, 10 September 2019: Youth Unemployment Statistics

This information is provided to Members of Parliament in support of their parliamentary duties. It is a general briefing only and should not be relied on as a substitute for specific advice. The House of Commons or the author(s) shall not be liable for any errors or omissions, or for any loss or damage of any kind arising from its use, and may remove, vary or amend any information at any time without prior notice.

6 Read more

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 06045, 4 September 2019: English Baccalaureate

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 06045, 4 September 2019: English Baccalaureate

We should acknowledge that the curriculum always involves trade-offs: more time on one subject means less time on others. Over the years, I’ve been asked to add scores of subjects - from intellectual property, to Esperanto, to den building - to the national curriculum. Many of these are important and interesting. The question, though, is always whether they are sufficiently important to justify reducing the time available for the existing subjects in the curriculum, and I make no apology for protecting space for the English Baccalaureate subjects wherever possible. That is not to say, of course, that subjects outside the English Baccalaureate have no place in schools. The EBacc is a specific, limited measure consisting of only 5 subject areas and up to 8 GCSEs. Whilst this means that there are several valuable subjects which are not included, it also means that there is time for most pupils to study other subjects in addition to the EBacc, including vocational and technical disciplines which are also vital to future economic growth.
Show more

27 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06045, 4 September 2017: English Baccalaureate

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06045, 4 September 2017: English Baccalaureate

a MFL in 2002; by 2010 this figure had dropped to just over 43 per cent. Entries have fallen again this year, with French and German down by just over 13 per cent. The number of pupils entered for history and geography GCSE is also declining. 4. The Government introduced the English Baccalaureate to halt and reverse the falls in these subjects. Through the establishment of the EBacc measure in the 2010 performance tables, we have enabled parents and pupils to see for the first time how their school is performing in these key academic subjects, and hope to encourage schools to offer a core of academic subjects and open up opportunities to all of their pupils. 6
Show more

26 Read more

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 5108, 12 April 2019 : Home education in England

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 5108, 12 April 2019 : Home education in England

In its response the Government stated that it had no wish to alter the basic right of parents to educate their children at home and noted that many who take this approach produce very good results. It added however, that it does not believe that recent growth in the number of home educated children is due to any significant growth in people believing in the virtues of home education in its own right. Rather, it said, the factors are often more negative (e.g. disagreements with the school) and that, while parents may try their best, this does not mean that the education provided is suitable in all cases. It also highlighted the use of unregulated settings which, although sometimes legitimate,
Show more

31 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08083, 8 September 2017: Gypsies and Travellers

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08083, 8 September 2017: Gypsies and Travellers

designated as particularly vulnerable. Male Irish travellers in Ireland have a suicide rate 6.6 times higher than the general population; Gypsy Travellers in the Thames Valley have a 100-fold excess risk of measles arising from low immunisation. The report of the Confidential Enquiry into Maternal Deaths in the UK, 1997-99, found that Travellers have ‘possibly the highest maternal death rate among all ethnic groups’. These population health findings based on robust data are stark and require urgent public health focus, including targeted suicide prevention services, a robust system of reporting of infectious diseases in the Gypsy/Traveller population and of levels of immunisation (both currently absent), and a robust system for monitoring maternal mortality (also absent) . 89
Show more

53 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...

Related subjects