Top PDF House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 10 October 2018: Physical education and sport in schools

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 10 October 2018: Physical education and sport in schools

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 10 October 2018: Physical education and sport in schools

The premium has enabled schools to enhance both the quality and range of PE teaching and sports provision. As a result of this investment, schools reported a range of positive impacts on pupils including increased pupil engagement and participation in PE and sports as well as impacts on social and inter-personal skills, behaviour, and PE skills and fitness. Schools also perceived positive impacts on the skills and confidence of teachers to deliver PE. The findings of this study have also highlighted challenges for the future of PE and sport in primary schools. To sustain the impact of the premium, schools have used it to invest in training for existing staff. However, a question remains over how to maintain this investment in CPD for new teachers entering the profession, once premium funding ends. Schools also raised issues related to sourcing good quality provision in their local area, and may need further support to robustly assess the quality of the provision available. The survey also found that monitoring and evaluation of the premium was not consistent and schools may require further advice and guidance to support them to first assess impacts and then put in place strategies for continuing quality improvement. 27
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 1 March 2017: School Sport in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 1 March 2017: School Sport in England

The premium has enabled schools to enhance both the quality and range of PE teaching and sports provision. As a result of this investment, schools reported a range of positive impacts on pupils including increased pupil engagement and participation in PE and sports as well as impacts on social and inter-personal skills, behaviour, and PE skills and fitness. Schools also perceived positive impacts on the skills and confidence of teachers to deliver PE. The findings of this study have also highlighted challenges for the future of PE and sport in primary schools. To sustain the impact of the premium, schools have used it to invest in training for existing staff. However, a question remains over how to maintain this investment in CPD for new teachers entering the profession, once premium funding ends. Schools also raised issues related to sourcing good quality provision in their local area, and may need further support to robustly assess the quality of the provision available. The survey also found that monitoring and evaluation of the premium was not consistent and schools may require further advice and guidance to support them to first assess impacts and then put in place strategies for continuing quality improvement. 19
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 8 June 2018: School Sport in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 8 June 2018: School Sport in England

In January 2012, the then Culture Secretary, Jeremy Hunt, announced the publication of a five-year youth and community sport strategy aimed at increasing the number of young people developing sport as a habit for life. Among other things, the strategy aimed to improve the link between schools and local sports clubs, with the objective that by 2017 “every secondary school and many primary schools will have links with at least one local club.” The strategy additionally committed funding “to allow schools to open up their sports facilities … to the public.” 62
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 17 October 2018: Initial teacher training in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 17 October 2018: Initial teacher training in England

Around 30,000 individuals enter ITT in England each year through several routes. Although they vary in other ways, the main distinctions between the different ITT routes are whether they are school-centred (for example, School Direct) or higher education led, and whether the trainee pays tuition fees or receives a salary. A school-led postgraduate teaching apprenticeship has also been available since September 2018. All ITT courses include time spent teaching in at least two schools and lead to an award of qualified teacher status (QTS).

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House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 08444, 10 December 2018 : Off-rolling in English schools

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 08444, 10 December 2018 : Off-rolling in English schools

29. Pupils count towards the Progress 8 scores of schools if they are registered on the school’s census in the January in which they are in Year 11. While Progress 8 tracks the academic ‘distance’ travelled by a student and takes into account prior attainment, pupils who fall behind in secondary school, for example for medical reasons or because a pupil’s additional needs which were met in their smaller primary school but then become unmet in larger secondary settings, can negatively affect a school’s results. Off-rolling— the process by which pupils are removed from the school’s register by moving them to alternative provision, to home education or other schools—was raised by many witnesses, and we were told that the accountability system and Progress 8 was a major factor. […]
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 17 October 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 17 October 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

For the 2018-19 academic year, ITT providers were invited to request training places “based on a realistic assessment of local need and minimum sustainability of their ITT programmes” Fixed allocations were given for undergraduate, Early Years, postgraduate Physical Education and Primary School Direct (salaried) courses and providers could not recruit trainees in excess of their allocation. Recruitment controls were lifted for all other postgraduate courses, meaning that ITT providers had automatic permission to recruit above the number of training places they initially requested, with no cap.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08414, 9 October 2018: School uniform costs in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08414, 9 October 2018: School uniform costs in England

2.5 The government wants to ensure that families get the best value for school uniforms. A 2015 Department for Education survey found that nearly one-fifth of parents and carers reported that they had suffered financial hardship as a result of purchasing their child’s school uniform. The survey found that parents and carers are significantly less likely to report that they have experienced hardship if schools allow them to purchase uniforms from a variety of suppliers. The government wants to ensure that effective competition is used to drive better value for money and will therefore put existing best practice guidance for school uniform supply in England on a statutory footing. This will ensure that schools deliver the best value for parents by avoiding exclusivity arrangements unless regular competitions for suppliers are run. (pg 11)
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06103, 1 August 2018: Relationships and Sex Education in Schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06103, 1 August 2018: Relationships and Sex Education in Schools (England)

recommend therefore that all primary schools should have a sex education programme tailored to the age and the physical and emotional maturity of the pupils. It should ensure that both boys and girls are prepared for the changes adolescence brings and – drawing on knowledge of the human life cycle set out in the national curriculum for science - how a baby is conceived and born. As well as consulting parents more generally about the school’s overall policy, primary schools should consult with parents before final year of primary school about the detailed content of what will be taught. (p18)
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07236, 8 October 2018: Careers guidance in schools, colleges and universities

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07236, 8 October 2018: Careers guidance in schools, colleges and universities

I have consistently heard calls from both employers and schools and colleges to help them navigate this complex landscape and to spread the good practice that is happening in some parts of the country to all. Today I am answering those calls. I am pleased to tell the House that Christine Hodgson, chair of Capgemini UK and someone with a strong track record of developing young talent, will chair a new careers and enterprise company for schools. This will transform the provision of careers education and advice for young people and inspire them to take control of and shape their own futures.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 04195, 5 April 2018: Schools meals and nutritional standards (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 04195, 5 April 2018: Schools meals and nutritional standards (England)

Research carried out in 2004 by the then Department for Education and Skills (DfES) and the Food Standards Agency showed that while schools and caterers responded positively to the standards, in practice, children and young people continued to make unhealthy choices. Statistics from the Annual Health Survey for England 2004 showed that the levels of obesity for children had risen over the previous 10 years. Ongoing concerns led to the publication in 2004 of the DfES’s guidance, Healthy Living Blueprint for Schools , and the Government’s white paper,
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8023, 5 October 2018: Safeguarding in English schools

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8023, 5 October 2018: Safeguarding in English schools

In addition, the revised Keeping children safe in education guidance includes a new section on child on child sexual violence and sexual harassment. Reports of sexual violence and sexual harassment are likely to be complex and the guidance does not attempt to provide directions on what schools should do in any particular case. It instead sets out principles for schools to consider in their responses to such reports. Ultimately, it states, decisions are for “the school…to make on a case- by-case basis, with the designated safeguarding lead (or a deputy) taking a leading role and using their professional judgement, supported by other agencies, such as children’s social care and the police as required.” 34
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 05396, 25 October 2018: Constituency casework: schools in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 05396, 25 October 2018: Constituency casework: schools in England

Introductory information about exclusion and the appeal process is provided on the gov.uk School discipline and exclusions website. Under the Education Act 2011 new arrangements for school exclusion came into force in September 2012. These apply to any pupil excluded on or after 1 September 2012 from a maintained school, academy/free school, alternative provision academy/free school or pupil referral unit in England. Independent appeal panels were replaced by independent review panels, which do not have the power to order reinstatement of a pupil. The independent review panels are able to impose financial penalties on schools that exclude pupils unreasonably.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 10 January 2018: Initial teacher training in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 10 January 2018: Initial teacher training in England

Although they vary in other ways too, the main distinctions between the different ITT routes are whether they are ‘school-centred’ (for example, the School Direct programme and Teach First) or ‘higher education- centred’ (for example, a university-based PGCE course), and whether the trainee pays tuition fees or receives a salary. All courses include time spent teaching in at least two schools and lead to QTS. They can also all (except undergraduate) include a postgraduate qualification, usually a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE).

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8151, 19 February 2018: Higher education tuition fees in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8151, 19 February 2018: Higher education tuition fees in England

These figures provide no evidence that variable fees caused a major ongoing decline or downward shift in overall numbers of applicants or entrants to higher education in England. Similarly there is no evidence that those from ‘lower’ socio-economic groups or (deprived) areas with historically low levels of participation have been adversely affected by tuition fees. The proportion of students from these groups has increased over this period. A report from the funding council concluded that there have been substantial and sustained increases in participation among

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7857, 7 February 2018: Higher education student numbers

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7857, 7 February 2018: Higher education student numbers

This information is provided to Members of Parliament in support of their parliamentary duties. It is a general briefing only and should not be relied on as a substitute for specific advice. The House of Commons or the author(s) shall not be liable for any errors or omissions, or for any loss or damage of any kind arising from its use, and may remove, vary or amend any information at any time without prior notice.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6700, 17 April 2018: The Pupil Premium

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6700, 17 April 2018: The Pupil Premium

recommendation to define what “significant impact” meant in the context of the Pupil Premium. It stated that the DfE did not set national standards in education but instead intended to benchmark against the world’s highest- performing educational jurisdictions in terms of overall standards and the attainment gap between disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged pupils. The Government agreed with the Committee’s recommendations regarding the dissemination and sharing of best practice, and highlighted the role of the EEF and the Pupil Premium Awards in this regard. 40

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House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 7951, 21 December 2018 : T Levels : reforms to technical education

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 7951, 21 December 2018 : T Levels : reforms to technical education

In addition to this economic rationale, the report outlined a social need for change: that individuals should have access to a national system of technical qualifications that is easy to understand, has credibility with employers and remains stable over time. The current system, it argued, failed on all three counts, comprising “a confusing and ever-changing multitude of qualifications”, many of which “hold little value in the eyes of individuals and are not understood or sought by employers.” The report added that learners, teachers and the public have “long regarded technical education qualifications as inferior to academic qualifications”, and higher level technical qualifications “have too often become
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07236, 9 January 2018: Careers guidance in schools, colleges and universities

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07236, 9 January 2018: Careers guidance in schools, colleges and universities

[E]very word of the clause is needed because the clause is going to be met with great hostility in every school in the country. They are going to be required, by September, to produce a policy for implementing a right for people to come and tell them about other competitive sources of learning and training. It will require all the resources of the department and the powers of the Secretary of State to ensure that this happens, so that in September and October of this year we should have providers going into all the schools. 12

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House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 06103, 11 July 2019 : Relationships and Sex Education in Schools
(England)

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 06103, 11 July 2019 : Relationships and Sex Education in Schools (England)

The proposed changes to Part 2 [of Schedule 1 to the 2010 Regulations] are aimed at making it clear to independent schools that the proprietor must actively promote the fundamental British values that are set out in section 1.1(c) above and that schools must actively promote the specified principles, including furthering tolerance and harmony between different cultural traditions and encouraging respect for democracy. A minimum approach, for example putting up posters on a notice board and organising an occasional visit to places of worship would fall short of ‘actively promoting’. Schools will be expected to focus on, and be able to show how their work with pupils is effective in
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8389, 19 September 2018: Returns to a degree

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8389, 19 September 2018: Returns to a degree

consumption. Graduates are less likely to drink heavily, to smoke and to be obese. Overall, going to university appears to add eight years to your life. A 30-year old graduate is likely to live a further 51 years as against a further 43 years for a non-graduate.12 If we try to value these non-economic effects in financial terms the results are rather striking: the non-economic gains are actually larger in scale than the conventional economic effects. These non-economic benefits do not just accrue to individual graduates but to society as a whole. Graduates are, for example, less likely to commit crime and this feeds through into lower rates of incarceration and prison costs. It looks as if the children of graduates also benefit from their parents’ education and this feeds through into better health outcomes for the children too. 40
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