Top PDF House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 06103, 11 July 2019 : Relationships and Sex Education in Schools (England)

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 06103, 11 July 2019 : Relationships and Sex Education in Schools
(England)

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 06103, 11 July 2019 : Relationships and Sex Education in Schools (England)

8.3 Of the remaining responses there were 516 on whether the changes to the SMSC [spiritual, moral, social and cultural] standard are required to ensure the active promotion of fundamental British values and respect for other people. A significant number of respondents indicated that they disagreed with the proposed changes, but analysis of the related comments revealed that this was because of misunderstanding the effect or raising issues that were not part of the consultation. For example, some responses questioned the definition of the fundamental British values and requested that this be opened up for further debate; others maintained that the changes extend the equality agenda and will result in the marginalisation of Christianity; and others considered that the changes are not necessary, that the standards were only amended in January 2013, and that many schools are already doing this.
Show more

30 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 06103, 11 February 2019: Relationships and Sex Education in Schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 06103, 11 February 2019: Relationships and Sex Education in Schools (England)

8.3 Of the remaining responses there were 516 on whether the changes to the SMSC [spiritual, moral, social and cultural] standard are required to ensure the active promotion of fundamental British values and respect for other people. A significant number of respondents indicated that they disagreed with the proposed changes, but analysis of the related comments revealed that this was because of misunderstanding the effect or raising issues that were not part of the consultation. For example, some responses questioned the definition of the fundamental British values and requested that this be opened up for further debate; others maintained that the changes extend the equality agenda and will result in the marginalisation of Christianity; and others considered that the changes are not necessary, that the standards were only amended in January 2013, and that many schools are already doing this.
Show more

29 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06103, 1 August 2018: Relationships and Sex Education in Schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06103, 1 August 2018: Relationships and Sex Education in Schools (England)

8.3 Of the remaining responses there were 516 on whether the changes to the SMSC [spiritual, moral, social and cultural] standard are required to ensure the active promotion of fundamental British values and respect for other people. A significant number of respondents indicated that they disagreed with the proposed changes, but analysis of the related comments revealed that this was because of misunderstanding the effect or raising issues that were not part of the consultation. For example, some responses questioned the definition of the fundamental British values and requested that this be opened up for further debate; others maintained that the changes extend the equality agenda and will result in the marginalisation of Christianity; and others considered that the changes are not necessary, that the standards were only amended in January 2013, and that many schools are already doing this.
Show more

28 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6103, 2 March 2017: Sex and Relationships Education in Schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6103, 2 March 2017: Sex and Relationships Education in Schools (England)

The DfE has stated that regulations and statutory guidance to implement these plans will be subject to full public consultation later in 7 However, the DfE has stated that clarification is being sought on “the age at which a young person may have the right to make their own decisions,” and that a blanket right for parents to withdraw their child from sex education is no longer consistent with English caselaw (or with the ECHR and UNCRC). The outcome will be set out in regulations which will be subject to consultation and debate. See Department for Education, Policy Statement: Relationships Education, Relationships and Sex Education, and Personal, Social, Health, and Economic Education, March 2017
Show more

25 Read more

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 7647, 11 July 2019 : Early Intervention

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 7647, 11 July 2019 : Early Intervention

Systems. These systems bring together the NHS, local authorities and other local partners with the aim of ensuring women and their families receive seamless care, including when moving between maternity or neonatal services or to other services such as primary care or health visiting. By spring 2019, every trust in England with a maternity and neonatal service will be part of the National Maternal and Neonatal Health Safety Collaborative. Every national, regional and local NHS organisation involved in providing safe maternity and neonatal care has a named Maternity Safety Champion. Through the Collaborative and Maternity Safety Champions, the NHS is supporting a culture of multidisciplinary team working and learning, vital for safe, high-quality maternity care. Twenty Community Hubs have been established, focusing on areas with greatest need, and acting as ‘one stop shops’ for women and their families. These hubs work closely with local authorities, bringing together antenatal care, birth facilities, postnatal care, mental health services, specialist services and health visiting services.
Show more

55 Read more

Briefing Paper: Number 06103: 16 December 2016: Sex and Relationships Education in Schools (England)

Briefing Paper: Number 06103: 16 December 2016: Sex and Relationships Education in Schools (England)

The PSHE Association was strongly critical of the decision, with the Association’s Chief Executive, Joe Hayman, describing it as “an appalling failure,” and stating that: What is most baffling about this decision is that the Government has a range of objectives it seeks to achieve through PSHE education, including teaching pupils to stay safe online, promoting children and young people’s mental health and preventing radicalisation, child sexual exploitation and violence against women and girls. Its decision not to address a status quo in which these issues are addressed by untrained teachers in inadequate curriculum time – or left off the curriculum altogether – is self-defeating and leaves vulnerable young people at risk. 30
Show more

23 Read more

House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7393, 1 July 2019 : Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7393, 1 July 2019 : Higher education funding in England

Pre-2015 reforms The Government made estimates of the percentage RAB rate on new loans from 2012 when it published proposals for changes to funding. These are discussed in some detail in Changes to higher education funding and student support in England from 2012/13. The estimated RAB rate on new loans was put at ‘around 30%’, but subsequently increased to ‘around 35%’ 25 then to 35%-40% 26 , revised upwards again to ‘around 40%’ 27 and later to ‘around 45%’. 28 These increases were largely due to changes in economic forecasts, particularly on earnings. 29 These less optimistic forecast reduce the expected cash value of repayments and or delay when they will be made. Other factors behind the increase in the RAB rate include the higher than expected level of average tuition fee loans, a change to the timing of repayment
Show more

20 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 7096: 2 July 2019: Poverty in the UK: statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 7096: 2 July 2019: Poverty in the UK: statistics

introduced statutory ‘life chances’ indicators relating to children in England living in workless households and educational attainment at the end of Key Stage 4 (age 16). A policy paper published by the Department for Work and Pensions in April 2017, Improving Lives: Helping Workless Families , set out seven other non-statutory indicator areas, relating to parental conflict; poor parental mental health; drug and alcohol dependency; problem debt; homelessness; early years; and youth employment.

43 Read more

House of Commons Library : briefing paper : number 07972, 28 June 2019 : Independent schools (England)

House of Commons Library : briefing paper : number 07972, 28 June 2019 : Independent schools (England)

The consultation document indicated that the Government was considering legislation to exclude independent schools not meeting the relevant criteria from charitable status: 14. We propose to set new benchmarks that independent schools are expected to meet, in line with their size and capacity. We think it is essential that independent schools deliver these new benchmarks. If they do not, we will consider legislation to ensure that those independent schools that do not observe these new benchmarks cannot enjoy the benefits associated with charitable status, and to result in the Charity Commission revising its formal guidance to independent schools on how to meet the public benefit test, putting the new benchmarks on to a statutory footing. (page 16)
Show more

17 Read more

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 5108, 12 April 2019 : Home education in England

House of Commons Library briefing paper : number 5108, 12 April 2019 : Home education in England

Education Act 1996 they do have a duty to make arrangements to identify children in their area who are not receiving a suitable education. 21 The DfE’s guidance for local authorities explains that, while the law does not assume that a child is not being suitably educated if they are not attending school full-time, it does require local authorities to enquire what education is being provided. 22 There are no detailed requirements as to how a system of oversight should work, and it is for each local authority to decide its approach. However, the guidance emphasises that a proportional approach needs to be taken and local authorities should not exert more oversight than is actually needed when parents are providing a suitable education. It recommends that an authority should ordinarily make contact with home educating parents on at least an annual basis so that it can reasonably inform itself of the suitability of the education provided. 23
Show more

31 Read more

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 07196, 11 July 2019 : Children and young people’s mental health :   policy, services, funding and education

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 07196, 11 July 2019 : Children and young people’s mental health : policy, services, funding and education

4. Mental health in schools Schools are able to decide on the provision of mental health support for their pupils. Schools are not required to report centrally on the services they provide, but it has been estimated that 70% of secondary schools and 52% of primary schools in England offer counselling services. 65 The Government has reiterated that although schools play an important part in promoting mental wellbeing, teachers are not mental health professionals, and need backing from a range of specialised services. 66 There has been work to strengthen partnerships between education providers and mental health services, through a new pilot linking schools with single points of contact in child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS). The Government has said the pilot has led to improvements in higher quality and more timely referrals to specialist services for pupils. 67 The pilot initially reached 255 schools, and will be extended to 1,200 schools.
Show more

30 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 06972: 20 December 2019: Faith Schools in England: FAQs

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 06972: 20 December 2019: Faith Schools in England: FAQs

Maria Miller: My hon. Friend is right to raise this issue, which has been a concern for many of our constituents. I can confirm that nothing will change what children are taught. Teachers will be able to describe their belief that marriage is between a man and a woman, while acknowledging that same-sex marriage will be available. It is important to reassure people. There is a great deal of what perhaps one could call scaremongering. It is important that teachers and faith schools are aware that they will continue to enjoy the same situation as they do now. 18

22 Read more

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 07388, 18 September 2019: Language teaching in schools (England)

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 07388, 18 September 2019: Language teaching in schools (England)

Quality of language teaching As noted in section 2.1, the 2011 Ofsted report identified good teaching in two thirds of the lessons observed in primary school, with primary teachers’ subject knowledge and their teaching methods described as predominantly good. Some weaknesses lay in the assessment, and the monitoring and evaluation of provision, often because school leaders did not feel competent enough to judge language provision. The 2011 report stated that in many of the secondary schools visited, opportunities for students to listen to and communicate in the target language were often limited by many teachers’ unpreparedness to use it, and that teaching in Key Stage 4 was focused on achieving good examination results, but this did not always prepare students sufficiently for study at a more advanced level, post-16. However, teaching and learning were good in most of the post-16 providers visited, and the relatively small numbers of students on modern language courses achieved well. 11
Show more

30 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 07059: 18 June 2019: FAQs: Academies and free schools

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 07059: 18 June 2019: FAQs: Academies and free schools

• CBP 8419, School funding in England: FAQs • CBP 8106, Implementation of the national funding formula for schools in England. In July 2017, Education Secretary Justine Greening announced £1.3 billion additional funding for schools and high needs, across 2018-19 and 2019-20. This, she said, would allow per-pupil funding to be maintained in real terms for the final two years of the Spending Review period. The money, she said, would come from making efficiency savings in the existing DfE budget, including from the free schools programme:

25 Read more

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 7393, 4 January 2019 : Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 7393, 4 January 2019 : Higher education funding in England

funding and student support in England from 2012/13. The estimated RAB rate on new loans was put at ‘around 30%’, but subsequently increased to ‘around 35%’ 25 then to 35%-40% 26 , revised upwards again to ‘around 40%’ 27 and later to ‘around 45%’. 28 These increases were largely due to changes in economic forecasts, particularly on earnings. 29 These less optimistic forecast reduce the expected cash value of repayments and or delay when they will be made. Other factors behind the increase in the RAB rate include the higher than expected level of average tuition fee loans, a change to the timing of repayment threshold uprating, lower assumed repayments from the extra students who start higher education because the numbers cap is lifted 30 and improvements to the Governments loan repayment model which is used to forecast repayments and hence calculate the resource costs of
Show more

19 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 5440: 12 June 2019: Higher Education Finance Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 5440: 12 June 2019: Higher Education Finance Statistics

than half. 89 Provisional funding levels for financial year 2011-12 were for cuts of 6.4% in Scotland (excluding capital) and 12.5% in Wales. 10 Public funding in England in 2012 and later 2012 was the first year when the latest major reforms of higher education funding were implemented in England. Some but not all of these changes were recommended in the Browne Report. 11 For more details of the proposals see the note: Changes to higher education funding and student support from 2012/13. For more up-to-date information of the impact of these changes in total funding see HE in England from 2012: Funding and finance.
Show more

23 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7857, 7 February 2019: Higher education student numbers

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7857, 7 February 2019: Higher education student numbers

Further breakdowns of the HEIPR by age and mode can be found in the DfE publication Participation rates in higher education: 2006 to 2017. The DfE also publishes higher education entry rates by free school meal (FSM) eligibility. This covers young people who were in the state sector in England only. In 2016/17 26% of those eligible for FSM aged 15 (in 2012/13) had entered HE at ages 18 or 19. This was up from 14% in 2005/06 and was the highest level recorded. The rate among the non-FSM group was 43% in 2016/17, also a new record level. The absolute gap between these rates has decreased over time from 19 percentage points in 2005/06 to 18 points in the latest three years. 4 When the FSM entry rate data are broken down by gender and ethnicity they show:
Show more

20 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 10 October 2018: Physical education and sport in schools

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 10 October 2018: Physical education and sport in schools

would release £420 million, £315 million of which would come from the money originally committed for the HPCF: Efficiencies and savings across our main capital budget can, I believe, release £420 million. The majority of this will be from healthy pupils capital funding, from which we can make savings of £315 million. This reflects reductions in forecast revenue from the soft drinks industry levy. I will be able to channel the planned budget, which remains in place, to frontline schools, while meeting our commitment that every single pound of England’s share of spending from the levy will continue to be invested in improving children’s health; that includes £100 million in 2018-19 for healthy pupils capital. 34
Show more

34 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

respectively in 2016. This compares with 4.6% for White British pupils and 2.4% for Chinese pupils. 182 There is no requirement in England to attend school, although under section 7 of the Education Act 1996 (as amended) parents are required to ensure that children of compulsory school age 183 receive an efficient full-time education tailored to their aptitudes, abilities and any special needs they may have. As such, home education is legal and parents are not under any general requirement to notify the local authority that they intend to home educate. The local authority is not under a statutory duty to routinely monitor the quality of home education, but they are required to identify children of compulsory school age who are not receiving a suitable education.
Show more

79 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08083: 9 May 2019: Gypsies and Travellers

respectively in 2016. This compares with 4.6% for White British pupils and 2.4% for Chinese pupils. 182 There is no requirement in England to attend school, although under section 7 of the Education Act 1996 (as amended) parents are required to ensure that children of compulsory school age 183 receive an efficient full-time education tailored to their aptitudes, abilities and any special needs they may have. As such, home education is legal and parents are not under any general requirement to notify the local authority that they intend to home educate. The local authority is not under a statutory duty to routinely monitor the quality of home education, but they are required to identify children of compulsory school age who are not receiving a suitable education.
Show more

79 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...

Related subjects