Top PDF House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 8561: 17 May 2019: Post-16 Special Educational Needs and Disabilities in England: FAQs

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 8561: 17 May 2019: Post-16 Special Educational Needs and Disabilities in England: FAQs

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 8561: 17 May 2019: Post-16 Special Educational Needs and Disabilities in England: FAQs

The Education Secretary Damian Hinds has today (Sunday 16 December) announced that councils will receive an additional £250 million over the next two years on top of the £6 billion already provided for the high needs budget this year, to provide much needed support for children and young people with complex SEND. Families will also benefit from more choice for their child’s education through an extra £100 million investment to create more specialist places in mainstream schools, colleges and special schools, giving more children and young people access to a good school or college place that meets their individual needs. 15
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 8561: 17 May 2019: Post-16 Special Educational Needs and Disabilities in England: FAQs

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 8561: 17 May 2019: Post-16 Special Educational Needs and Disabilities in England: FAQs

The Education Secretary Damian Hinds has today (Sunday 16 December) announced that councils will receive an additional £250 million over the next two years on top of the £6 billion already provided for the high needs budget this year, to provide much needed support for children and young people with complex SEND. Families will also benefit from more choice for their child’s education through an extra £100 million investment to create more specialist places in mainstream schools, colleges and special schools, giving more children and young people access to a good school or college place that meets their individual needs. 15
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07020, 20 April 2018: Special Educational Needs: support in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07020, 20 April 2018: Special Educational Needs: support in England

• General FE and sixth form colleges must use their best endeavours to secure the special educational provision that the young person needs. This duty applies to all young people with SEN, with and without an Education Health and Care (EHC) plans up to age 25. Its purpose is to ensure that mainstream providers give the right support to their students with SEN. It does not apply to special post-16 institutions or special schools, as their principal purpose is to provide for this group.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 07020, 8 February 2019: Special Educational Needs: support in
England

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 07020, 8 February 2019: Special Educational Needs: support in England

Under the previous system, a statement of SEN stopped if a young person left school at 16. However, if the person remained at school, the local authority could maintain a statement until s/he reached 19 or until the end of the school year when s/he finished the course. If the young person left school for further education, his/her SEN was assessed under a different process, the Learning Difficulty Assessment (LDA). Section 139a of the Learning and Skills Act 2000 placed local authorities under a duty to arrange a LDA for students in their last year of compulsory education who had a statement of SEN and who were expected to continue in post-16 education. Local authorities also had the power to undertake LDAs for young people who did not have a statement but who appeared to have learning difficulties and were receiving, or were likely to receive post-16 education. LDAs however did not have the statutory rights and protections associated with statements of SEN.
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House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7393, 1 July 2019 : Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7393, 1 July 2019 : Higher education funding in England

This information is provided to Members of Parliament in support of their parliamentary duties. It is a general briefing only and should not be relied on as a substitute for specific advice. The House of Commons or the author(s) shall not be liable for any errors or omissions, or for any loss or damage of any kind arising from its use, and may remove, vary or amend any information at any time without prior notice.

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House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 7393, 4 January 2019 : Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 7393, 4 January 2019 : Higher education funding in England

This change has no effect on the loan figures included in this paper under the sections on the subsidy element of loans and overall public spending. These already include the share of loans which the Government expects will not be repaid as public spending as this is the true long term costs of loans. The section on the subsidy element has not yet been updated in light of the ONS announcement. It describes the previous accounting treatment of loans, but it, and the section on overall public spending, give the best current estimate of spending under what will be the new classification. They will both be updated when the ONS publishes guidance on the changes and provisional estimate in Summer 2019.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7222, 12 February 2019: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7222, 12 February 2019: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

The Department has missed its recruitment targets for the last 4 years and there are signs that teacher shortages are growing. By taking a national view of the number of teachers required, the Department risks paying too little attention to clearly meaningful local patterns of supply and demand. The Department does not yet have the information it needs to understand how different routes into teaching impact on schools’ ability to recruit and retain newly qualified teachers, and cannot yet demonstrate how new arrangements are improving the quality of teaching in classrooms. The Department has plans to analyse existing data further. However, until the Department meets its targets and addresses the remaining information gaps, we cannot conclude that the arrangements for training new teachers are value for money. The Department will also need to show that the arrangements are more cost-effective than alternative expenditure, for instance on improving retention. 185
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House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 8655, 12 September 2019: Funding for healthcare students in England

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 8655, 12 September 2019: Funding for healthcare students in England

The UCAS data covers full-time undergraduates only. Information from the Higher Education Statistics Agency covers all full- and part-time students. Their latest data are for academic year 2017/18, the first after the new funding rules were introduced. The total number of first year students from England studying nursing at UK universities fell by 13% from 49,600 to 43,200. The fall was larger among part-time students at 18% compared with 8% among full-timers. 6

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House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 08414, 1 August 2019 : School uniform costs in England

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 08414, 1 August 2019 : School uniform costs in England

2.5 The government wants to ensure that families get the best value for school uniforms. A 2015 Department for Education survey found that nearly one-fifth of parents and carers reported that they had suffered financial hardship as a result of purchasing their child’s school uniform. The survey found that parents and carers are significantly less likely to report that they have experienced hardship if schools allow them to purchase uniforms from a variety of suppliers. The government wants to ensure that effective competition is used to drive better value for money and will therefore put existing best practice guidance for school uniform supply in England on a statutory footing. This will ensure that schools deliver the best value for parents by avoiding exclusivity arrangements unless regular competitions for suppliers are run. (pg 11)
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 17 October 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 17 October 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

The report concluded that “schools face increasing challenges of teacher shortages, particularly within certain subjects and regions” and that rising pupil numbers and changes to accountability, such as the focus on English Baccalaureate subjects, “will exacerbate existing problems.” It stated that the Government is aware of the issues but “needs to identify a strategic, long-term plan to effectively address them.” The “failure of the National Teaching Service”, had, it added, left “a gap in the Government’s plans to tackle regional shortages.” 135

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 17 October 2018: Initial teacher training in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 17 October 2018: Initial teacher training in England

In July 2016, the Institute for Fiscal Studies published research into the longer-term costs and benefits of different ITT routes. The report found that ITT costs an average of £23,000 per trainee, taking into account costs to government and schools. In addition, a high drop-out rate of recently trained teachers means that over £38,000 is spent on training for every teacher still in post five years after completing training. The report also looked at the costs, benefits and retention rates of each ITT route. The findings from the report included:

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7357, 21 May 2018: Further Education: Post-16 Area Reviews

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7357, 21 May 2018: Further Education: Post-16 Area Reviews

The area-based reviews will cover FE colleges and sixth form colleges, but not school and academy sixth forms or other types of provider. The departments explained that this scoping decision had been made for two reasons: firstly to focus on the type of provision perceived to have the greatest need of restructuring; and secondly to keep the reviews manageable in scale. Therefore, while Regional Schools Commissioners will be involved in the reviews’ steering groups in order to inform them of any gaps or problems in school sixth form provision, no changes in school provision will be made as a result of the reviews. Furthermore, if a review concludes that there is over-provision for 16-19 year olds in a particular area, this will not influence the decisions made in response to any local schools or academies that might apply to expand their sixth form provision around the same time.
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 07585, 8 August 2019 : The Troubled Families Programme (England)

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 07585, 8 August 2019 : The Troubled Families Programme (England)

An impact evaluation, supported by a Technical Advisory Group, is assessing the impact of the Programme in phase two. An independent qualitative study is also being undertaken by Ipsos MORI. Section three of this paper outlines the most recent findings published in March 2019; Annex A lists the other reports that have been published for phase two. Qualitative data from staff involved in the Programme suggests that the second phase has been effective in initiating change at a local level. According to feedback, participant families see the benefit of the initiative.

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House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 07388, 18 September 2019: Language teaching in schools (England)

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 07388, 18 September 2019: Language teaching in schools (England)

As noted in section 2.1, the 2011 Ofsted report identified good teaching in two thirds of the lessons observed in primary school, with primary teachers’ subject knowledge and their teaching methods described as predominantly good. Some weaknesses lay in the assessment, and the monitoring and evaluation of provision, often because school leaders did not feel competent enough to judge language provision. The 2011 report stated that in many of the secondary schools visited, opportunities for students to listen to and communicate in the target language were often limited by many teachers’ unpreparedness to use it, and that teaching in Key Stage 4 was focused on achieving good examination results, but this did not always prepare students sufficiently for study at a more advanced level, post-16. However, teaching and learning were good in most of the post-16 providers visited, and the relatively small numbers of students on modern language courses achieved well. 11
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House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 07375, 18 September 2019: School buildings and capital funding (England)

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 07375, 18 September 2019: School buildings and capital funding (England)

This information is provided to Members of Parliament in support of their parliamentary duties. It is a general briefing only and should not be relied on as a substitute for specific advice. The House of Commons or the author(s) shall not be liable for any errors or omissions, or for any loss or damage of any kind arising from its use, and may remove, vary or amend any information at any time without prior notice.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08543: 28 June 2019: Children's social care services in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 08543: 28 June 2019: Children's social care services in England

My hon. Friend the Member for Telford has an interest in early intervention. I assure her that, across Government, we are addressing the root causes of children’s needs early - be it by supporting children with alcohol-dependent parents or in families affected by domestic abuse, preventing young people from being drawn into serious violence, or investing in early years and children’s and young people’s mental health. Our “Working Together to Safeguard Children” statutory guidance is clear that local areas should have a comprehensive range of effective evidence-based services in place to address assessed needs early. The Government have also committed £920 million to the troubled families programme, which aims to achieve significant and sustained improvement for up to 400,000 families with multiple high-cost problems by 2020.
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House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 06103, 11 July 2019 : Relationships and Sex Education in Schools
(England)

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 06103, 11 July 2019 : Relationships and Sex Education in Schools (England)

8.2 In relation to equality legislation, the proposals are that schools should encourage pupils to respect other people, even if they do not agree with them. This does not extend equality requirements or discriminate against Christianity or religious freedoms. The amended standard would not require a school to do anything that they are not currently required to do by the Equality Act 2010 (which applies to independent schools). 8.3 Of the remaining responses there were 516 on whether the changes to the SMSC [spiritual, moral, social and cultural] standard are required to ensure the active promotion of fundamental British values and respect for other people. A significant number of respondents indicated that they disagreed with the proposed changes, but analysis of the related comments revealed that this was because of misunderstanding the effect or raising issues that were not part of the consultation. For example, some responses questioned the definition of the fundamental British values and requested that this be opened up for further debate; others maintained that the changes extend the equality agenda and will result in the marginalisation of Christianity; and others considered that the changes are not necessary, that the standards were only amended in January 2013, and that many schools are already doing this.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 8577: 30 May 2019: The Post-18 Education Review (the Augar Review)
recommendations

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 8577: 30 May 2019: The Post-18 Education Review (the Augar Review) recommendations

For too long, we’ve had a system that works for half the population whilst neglecting the other half. We live in a country with 9 million adults with poor basic skills, even more lacking strong digital literacy, skills gaps widening particularly in intermediate skills, employers struggling to recruit in many roles and enormous demand for tech experts to help reap the benefits of digital transformation. Our education and training system is not delivering to meet these needs now, so changes and fairer investment are vital.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 06103, 11 February 2019: Relationships and Sex Education in Schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 06103, 11 February 2019: Relationships and Sex Education in Schools (England)

8.2 In relation to equality legislation, the proposals are that schools should encourage pupils to respect other people, even if they do not agree with them. This does not extend equality requirements or discriminate against Christianity or religious freedoms. The amended standard would not require a school to do anything that they are not currently required to do by the Equality Act 2010 (which applies to independent schools). 8.3 Of the remaining responses there were 516 on whether the changes to the SMSC [spiritual, moral, social and cultural] standard are required to ensure the active promotion of fundamental British values and respect for other people. A significant number of respondents indicated that they disagreed with the proposed changes, but analysis of the related comments revealed that this was because of misunderstanding the effect or raising issues that were not part of the consultation. For example, some responses questioned the definition of the fundamental British values and requested that this be opened up for further debate; others maintained that the changes extend the equality agenda and will result in the marginalisation of Christianity; and others considered that the changes are not necessary, that the standards were only amended in January 2013, and that many schools are already doing this.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6700, 17 April 2018: The Pupil Premium

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6700, 17 April 2018: The Pupil Premium

The report included a section written by Sir John Dunford, the National Pupil Premium Champion 2013-2015, setting out what good practice looks like in schools that are closing their progress gap and how that good practice can be spread nationally. This stated that to make the most of the Pupil Premium, schools must “properly assess the barriers to learning faced by their own disadvantaged pupils, identify clear objectives and criteria for success, and follow the evidence on what works provided by the Education Endowment Foundation and the National Foundation for Educational Research, among others.” 41
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