Top PDF House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07020, 18 April 2017: Special Educational Needs: support in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07020, 18 April 2017: Special Educational Needs: support in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07020, 18 April 2017: Special Educational Needs: support in England

give parents a real choice of school, either a mainstream or special school. We will remove the bias towards inclusion and propose to strengthen parental choice by improving the range and diversity of schools from which parents can choose, making sure they are aware of the options available to them and by changing statutory guidance for local authorities. Parents of children with statements of SEN will be able to express a preference for any state-funded school – including special schools, Academies and Free Schools – and have their preference met unless it would not meet the needs of the child, be incompatible with the efficient education of other children, or be an inefficient use of resources. We will also prevent the unnecessary closure of special schools by giving parents and community groups the power to take them over 11
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 07020, 8 February 2019: Special Educational Needs: support in
England

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 07020, 8 February 2019: Special Educational Needs: support in England

give parents a real choice of school, either a mainstream or special school. We will remove the bias towards inclusion and propose to strengthen parental choice by improving the range and diversity of schools from which parents can choose, making sure they are aware of the options available to them and by changing statutory guidance for local authorities. Parents of children with statements of SEN will be able to express a preference for any state-funded school – including special schools, Academies and Free Schools – and have their preference met unless it would not meet the needs of the child, be incompatible with the efficient education of other children, or be an inefficient use of resources. We will also prevent
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07020, 20 April 2018: Special Educational Needs: support in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07020, 20 April 2018: Special Educational Needs: support in England

• General FE and sixth form colleges must use their best endeavours to secure the special educational provision that the young person needs. This duty applies to all young people with SEN, with and without an Education Health and Care (EHC) plans up to age 25. Its purpose is to ensure that mainstream providers give the right support to their students with SEN. It does not apply to special post-16 institutions or special schools, as their principal purpose is to provide for this group.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 8561: 17 May 2019: Post-16 Special Educational Needs and Disabilities in England: FAQs

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 8561: 17 May 2019: Post-16 Special Educational Needs and Disabilities in England: FAQs

The support provided by institutions commonly includes: signers, note- takers, specialist support workers for those with mental health problems or SpLD (e.g. dyslexia tutors who work on a one-to-one basis with students on writing skills), help with assessment such as exam access arrangements (e.g. supervised rest breaks, separate room, additional time allowance, sitting exams at home), lecture notes and handouts in alternative formats, use of computers and assistive software and advising on adjustments to teaching approaches.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 8561: 17 May 2019: Post-16 Special Educational Needs and Disabilities in England: FAQs

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 8561: 17 May 2019: Post-16 Special Educational Needs and Disabilities in England: FAQs

The support provided by institutions commonly includes: signers, note- takers, specialist support workers for those with mental health problems or SpLD (e.g. dyslexia tutors who work on a one-to-one basis with students on writing skills), help with assessment such as exam access arrangements (e.g. supervised rest breaks, separate room, additional time allowance, sitting exams at home), lecture notes and handouts in alternative formats, use of computers and assistive software and advising on adjustments to teaching approaches.

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House of Commons Library : Briefing Paper: Number 5108, 18 January 2017: Home education in England

House of Commons Library : Briefing Paper: Number 5108, 18 January 2017: Home education in England

Parents who choose to home-educate their children are responsible for ensuring that the education provided is efficient, full-time and suitable to the child’s age, ability, aptitude and any special educational needs they may have. They do not have to follow the national curriculum. The parents of home educated children must be prepared to assume full financial responsibility, including bearing the cost of any public examinations.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6281, 3 April 2017: Support for postgraduate students in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6281, 3 April 2017: Support for postgraduate students in England

Public funding for postgraduates has traditionally been limited compared to that available to undergraduates. Prior to 2016-17, Government funding was generally limited to specific courses, such as some postgraduate teacher training and some medical and healthcare courses, or provided indirectly through the Research Councils and the Postgraduate Support Scheme. Aside from self-financing, other sources of funding for postgraduate students were from individual higher education institutions, Professional and Career Development Loans, and educational trusts and charities.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 04195, 5 April 2018: Schools meals and nutritional standards (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 04195, 5 April 2018: Schools meals and nutritional standards (England)

As a result of these proposals, we estimate that by 2022 around 50,000 more children will benefit from a free school meal compared to the previous benefits system. We will keep the threshold constant until the end of the Universal Credit rollout period, and will then keep the threshold under review to ensure that those who most need support are benefiting. We will provide additional funding to schools to recognise the increase in the number of free school meals they will be providing. 16

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 04195, 21 November 2017: School meals and nutritional standards (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 04195, 21 November 2017: School meals and nutritional standards (England)

3.4 To enable a greater number of children to benefit from free school meals, we are proposing a net earnings threshold of £7,400 per annum for a household’s eligibility for free school meals. We estimate that, under this threshold, an extra 50,000 children would become eligible for free school meals, compared to today’s number of claimants. It is important to note that the net earnings threshold does not represent a household’s total income, as it does not include their income from benefits, which significantly increase a household’s overall income. A typical family earning around £7,400 per annum would, depending on their exact circumstances, have a total household income of between £18,000 and £24,000 once benefits are taken into account. 11
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 13 June 2017: Initial teacher training in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 13 June 2017: Initial teacher training in England

• Higher costs and lower retention rates for Teach First mean that the cost per teacher in school five years after training is more than £60,000 for a Teach First recruit, compared with £25,000 to £44,000 for other routes. This may be justified by the fact that Teach First trainees are disproportionately likely to teach in disadvantaged schools and that Teach First may attract graduates who would otherwise not enter teaching. The additional cost needs to be weighed against the possible benefits.

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House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 07375, 18 September 2019: School buildings and capital funding (England)

House of Commons Library Briefing Paper: Number 07375, 18 September 2019: School buildings and capital funding (England)

On 28 February 2017, the DfE announced that £415 million of funding from the soft drinks industry levy would be allocated to schools in 2018-19 to “pay for facilities to support physical education, after-school activities and healthy eating.” It added that schools would be able to use the funding – referred to as the healthy pupils capital fund (HPCF) – to “improve facilities for children with physical conditions or support young people struggling with mental health issues.” 15

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6962, 31 March 2017: GCSE, AS and A level reform (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6962, 31 March 2017: GCSE, AS and A level reform (England)

From 2015, the AS-level will be decoupled as a stand-alone, linear qualification and will remain at the same level of challenge as existing AS qualifications. That means that schools and colleges can decide whether to teach the AS-level over one year or two years. If schools and colleges decide to teach the AS in any given subject in one year, that would give them the opportunity, which I think the hon. Member for Scunthorpe (Nic Dakin) was seeking— it is a valid concern—to co-teach the AS and the new A-level together, if that meets the needs of the students and if it is a sensible way for those institutions to ensure that they can deliver education for all young people who want to access both A-levels and the AS.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06962, 31 March 2017: GCSE, AS and A level reform (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06962, 31 March 2017: GCSE, AS and A level reform (England)

The next stage of the reforms was announced on 17 September 2012 when the then Education Secretary, Michael Gove, made an oral statement in the House of Commons. This was made against the background of concern about the grading of GCSEs in English. Mr Gove announced that the Government intended to replace GCSEs with new qualifications, to be called English Baccalaureate Certificates (EBCs), which would cover the core academic subjects that make up the current English Baccalaureate – English, Mathematics, sciences, history, geography and languages. He also proposed a single awarding
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6972, 13 March 2017: Faith Schools in England: FAQs

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6972, 13 March 2017: Faith Schools in England: FAQs

The vast majority of faith schools in England have a Christian faith designation, but there are also a small number of schools with other faith designations – including Muslim, Jewish and Sikh. Schools with a faith designation are able to use faith criteria in their oversubscription criteria, but they must (with the exception of grammar schools) offer a place to any child, where a place is available. Dependent on school type, having a faith designation may impact also on staffing policy, what is included in the Religious Education curriculum, and the ownership of the school buildings.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7393, 14 June 2017: Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7393, 14 June 2017: Higher education funding in England

The Secretary of State writes to HEFCE around the turn of each year to set out funding, priorities, student numbers and related matters for the following financial year. Occasionally these letters cover more than one year and sometimes revised versions are published. The most recent full funding letter was published at the end of February 2017. It covered funding in 2017-18 and gave indicative allocations for the following year. All these funding letters from the mid-1990s onwards can be found at: http://www.hefce.ac.uk/funding/annallocns/Archive/ The following table summarises HEFCE funding
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07980, 19 June 2017: 'SATs' and primary school assessment in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07980, 19 June 2017: 'SATs' and primary school assessment in England

On 19 October 2016, Education Secretary Justine Greening said in a Statement that the then Government was committed to a period of stability in primary assessment, and would consult further in 2017. No new national assessments would be introduced before 2018-19, nor would planned resits for year seven (first year of secondary schooling) who hadn’t reached the expected standards at the end of primary schooling. The grammar, spelling and punctuation tests aimed at children in year two (age six or seven) would remain non-statutory, meaning schools did not have to administer them.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 07714, 1 April 2019: The Family Test

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 07714, 1 April 2019: The Family Test

The network pays particular attention to the need highlighted in the report to build evidence, and we are currently exploring ways to support Departments in that. We will continue to encourage and support Departments to apply the family test, and to make their own judgments on whether and when publishing assessments is appropriate. We will consider whether more can be done to improve transparency, which includes reflecting on the report’s recommendations. It is unclear, however, whether knowing how many family tests a certain Department has applied would bring much greater or more meaningful transparency.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08083, 8 September 2017: Gypsies and Travellers

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 08083, 8 September 2017: Gypsies and Travellers

Our surveys support assertions in other literature that the Gypsy, Romany and Traveller group are experiencing poorer outcomes across a range of areas. Most concerning are the negative perceptions of their own safety in prison and the levels of victimisation they report, both priority areas where action is needed. Prisoners who consider themselves to be Gypsy, Romany or Traveller are also more likely to report problems in areas of health, including mental health, and substance misuse. However, they consistently state they are less likely to receive support in these, and other, areas. We have identified good practice in some establishments but in others this is hampered by the lack of knowledge about these prisoners. 136
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6700, 17 April 2018: The Pupil Premium

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6700, 17 April 2018: The Pupil Premium

Children’s experiences prior to entering care have a long-lasting effect on their educational attainment. When children leave care, through for example adoption, it is unlikely that their educational needs will change significantly simply because their care status has changed. Recent school performance data shows that children who have left care significantly underperform compared to children who have never been in care. We believe the funding system should treat both children in care and those who have left care equally. 9

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House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 07714, 1 February 2017 : The Family Test

House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 07714, 1 February 2017 : The Family Test

For instance, Caroline Ansell asked Departments about training they had provided on the Family Test. Tim Loughton has asked Departments about what guidance they had given to support the implementation of the Test. Nic Dakin has asked Departments what steps they have taken to embed the Family Test in policy making. Kate Green has asked Departments about the guidance they have provided on implementing Family Test, and the number of policies assessed against the Family Test. Many of the responses describe briefly what the Family Test is and refer to the guidance issued by DWP but provide little additional information. David Burrowes has asked several questions about the Family Test since its introduction; for example:
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