Top PDF House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 4 June 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 4 June 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 4 June 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

The Department has missed its recruitment targets for the last 4 years and there are signs that teacher shortages are growing. By taking a national view of the number of teachers required, the Department risks paying too little attention to clearly meaningful local patterns of supply and demand. The Department does not yet have the information it needs to understand how different routes into teaching impact on schools’ ability to recruit and retain newly qualified teachers, and cannot yet demonstrate how new arrangements are improving the quality of teaching in classrooms. The Department has plans to analyse existing data further. However, until the Department meets its targets and addresses the remaining information gaps, we cannot conclude that the arrangements for training new teachers are value for money. The Department will also need to show that the arrangements are more cost-effective than alternative expenditure, for instance on improving retention. 143
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 19 January 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 19 January 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

In November 2016, the NCTL launched a second pilot scheme to recruit returning teachers. Under the pilot, a package of support, including a bursary of £600 and a 2-4 week training course, was provided to returning teachers in maths, physics, and languages. Schools Direct lead schools, multi-academy trusts, and higher education institutions, among others, in the north-west and south-east were invited to become lead schools for the pilot. Lead schools were to be provided with grant funding and were responsible for coordinating the programme of support. They will receive a further payment upon employment of the returning teacher. The application round for the second cohort of the pilot closed on 20 February 2017.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7222, 12 February 2019: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 7222, 12 February 2019: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

For the 2018-19 academic year, ITT providers were invited to request training places “based on a realistic assessment of local need and minimum sustainability of their ITT programmes” Fixed allocations were given for undergraduate, Early Years, postgraduate Physical Education and Primary School Direct (salaried) courses and providers could not recruit trainees in excess of their allocation. Recruitment controls were lifted for all other postgraduate courses, meaning that ITT providers had automatic permission to recruit above the number of training places they initially requested, with no cap.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 17 October 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7222, 17 October 2018: Teacher recruitment and retention in England

On 4 October 2016, the then Education Secretary, Justine Greening, announced £60 million of funding for six ‘Opportunity Areas’ to help them “address the biggest challenges they face”. The six areas were Blackpool, Derby, Norwich, Oldham, Scarborough, and West Somerset. It was stated that the areas would be given prioritised access to a wider support package, including a £75 million teaching and leadership innovation fund “focused on supporting teachers and school leaders in challenging areas to develop.” 72 £10 million of the funding is available for teachers in opportunity areas and category 5 and
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 13 June 2017: Initial teacher training in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 13 June 2017: Initial teacher training in England

More recently, in its April 2017 report, Whither Teacher Education and Training?, the Higher Education Policy Institute questioned the use of bursaries as an effective way of boosting recruitment and noted a suspicion that some trainees may be attracted by the bursary but do not intend to teach or stay in the profession for more than a couple of years. The report recommended the replacement of bursaries with a system of ‘forgivable fees’. Such a policy would, it said, “reward teaching and retention in the profession, not training” and would mean that teachers could be free of tuition fee debt by the age of 30. 35
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 10 January 2018: Initial teacher training in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 10 January 2018: Initial teacher training in England

All trainees, regardless of route, are required to meet a number of minimum standards. They must, for example, hold GCSEs in English and Maths (and science for enrolment on primary ITT) at grade C / grade 4 or higher. In addition, since September 2013 trainees have had to sit and pass professional skills tests in literacy and numeracy before beginning their course. Prior to 2013, the passing of the tests was an exit requirement of training. The system of financial support for teacher trainees is complex. Broadly, eligible

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 13 June 2018: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 13 June 2018: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

From 2013-14, grant funding for leaners aged 24 and over studying at levels 3 and 4 (e.g. A-levels) was removed and replaced with Advanced Learner Loans. Initially, loans also replaced grants for apprentices aged 24 and over studying at level 3 and above. However, loans for apprentices were dropped from February 2014 onwards, in part due to low take-up, and higher level apprenticeships were instead made eligible for grant funding from the ASB. 15 Following an announcement at the Spending Review

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 13 June 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7019, 13 June 2018: 16-19 education funding in England since 2010

We have protected the base rate of funding at £4,000 per student for all types of providers until 2020 to ensure that happens. Extra funding is provided where needed, for example, for students on large academic programmes and for providers to attract, support and retain disadvantaged 16 to 19-year olds. In addition, my Rt hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, announced in the Spring Budget a significant investment in technical education for 16-19 year olds, rising to an additional £500 million a year. The first £74 million of this investment will be allocated to help institutions build their capacity for the improved work placements that will form part of new T level programmes, from April 2018 to July 2019.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06972, 6 June 2018: Faith Schools in England: FAQs

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06972, 6 June 2018: Faith Schools in England: FAQs

The Government is absolutely clear that the changes make no difference to the existing legal obligations that schools have under the Equality Act 2010. All schools are already required to abide by the Act and their obligations are not altered by the changes to the standards. The changes do not fetter the views of individual teachers or censor the discussion of relevant matters. A teacher who, for instance, disagrees with same-sex marriage because of their Christian faith will not be prevented from expressing that view by these changes. Since the changes make no difference to schools’ existing legal obligations under the Equality Act there is no question of the ability of schools to teach traditional Christian values being overridden. 17
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06103, 1 August 2018: Relationships and Sex Education in Schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 06103, 1 August 2018: Relationships and Sex Education in Schools (England)

8.1 The proposed changes made by these Regulations were subject to a six-week consultation from 23 June to 4 August. This resulted in 1462 responses. Of these 909 were in support of a campaign that claimed the effect of the changes would be, amongst other things, to: introduce new values; extend the equality agenda; discriminate against Christianity; and undermine religious freedoms. This is not correct. The fundamental British values are not new. They were defined in the government’s 2011 Prevent Strategy and have been part of the Independent School Standards since the beginning of 2013.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 17 October 2018: Initial teacher training in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 17 October 2018: Initial teacher training in England

In July 2016, the Institute for Fiscal Studies published research into the longer-term costs and benefits of different ITT routes. The report found that ITT costs an average of £23,000 per trainee, taking into account costs to government and schools. In addition, a high drop-out rate of recently trained teachers means that over £38,000 is spent on training for every teacher still in post five years after completing training. The report also looked at the costs, benefits and retention rates of each ITT route. The findings from the report included:

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 6 June 2018: Initial teacher training in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 6 June 2018: Initial teacher training in England

There are also now a limited number of undergraduate degrees that allow the student to incorporate teacher training partway through the degree course, after an experience of classroom teaching. Successful students graduate with both a degree in their chosen subject and a recommendation for QTS. The length of the degree course is unaffected as the school placements are incorporated within the original course length. Degrees with QTS opt-in all focus on secondary school teaching and BA, BSc and Integrated Masters courses are available. A list of universities offering these courses is available on the Get Into Teaching website.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 8 June 2018: School Sport in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6836, 8 June 2018: School Sport in England

The 2015 Sport Strategy, Sporting Future, stated that a working group would be established in early 2016 to advise on how to ensure that no child leaves school unable to meet a minimum capability in swimming. The report of the Curriculum Swimming and Water Safety Review Group was published in July 2017. It stated that almost a third (31 per cent) of Year 6 pupils finish primary schools without being able to swim and without basic water safety skills. The report made 16 recommendations for Government, the education sector and the leisure industry aimed at ensuring that “all children leave primary school with an appropriate level of swimming and water safety ability.” 4 In the second annual
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 7756: 12 June 2019: Carers

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper Number 7756: 12 June 2019: Carers

This action plan outlines the cross-government programme of work to support carers in England over the next two years and builds on the National Carers Strategy. It retains the strategic vision for recognising, valuing and supporting carers from 2008, which has been the vision of successive governments. It sets out this Government’s commitment to supporting carers through 64 actions across five priorities emerging from the carers' Call for Evidence. The actions focus on delivery and tangible progress that can be made in the near future, and give visibility to the wide range of work that is planned or already underway across government to support carers, their families and those they care for. 128
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 4 December 2018: Adult further education funding in England since
2010

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7708, 4 December 2018: Adult further education funding in England since 2010

At the Autumn Budget 2018, the Government stated that the first phase of the retraining scheme would include a new careers guidance service to help people identify work in their area, and “state-of-the-art courses combining online learning with traditional classroom teaching to develop key transferrable skills.” It added that phase two would focus on job-specific retraining. 47

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7393, 14 June 2017: Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7393, 14 June 2017: Higher education funding in England

Estimated overall spending levels up to 2018-19 are given opposite. Again they include the subsidy element or economic cost of loans, but here they use the current RAB rate estimate of 20-25% of their face value. Cuts in maintenance grants have been projected forward and converted to financial year figures. The HEFCE funding data is that shown in the earlier table.

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House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 7393, 4 January 2019 : Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library briefing paper : Number 7393, 4 January 2019 : Higher education funding in England

This change has no effect on the loan figures included in this paper under the sections on the subsidy element of loans and overall public spending. These already include the share of loans which the Government expects will not be repaid as public spending as this is the true long term costs of loans. The section on the subsidy element has not yet been updated in light of the ONS announcement. It describes the previous accounting treatment of loans, but it, and the section on overall public spending, give the best current estimate of spending under what will be the new classification. They will both be updated when the ONS publishes guidance on the changes and provisional estimate in Summer 2019.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07091, 18 April 2018: School inspections in England: Ofsted

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07091, 18 April 2018: School inspections in England: Ofsted

Outcome 4 – the lead inspector has gathered evidence that suggests the school may be inadequate in one or more of the graded judgements under section 5 inspections; there are serious concerns about safeguarding, pupils’ behaviour or the quality of education; there are concerns that the performance of an outstanding non-exempt school could be declining to ‘requires improvement’. The short inspection will be converted to a section 5 inspection, usually within 48 hours.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07091, 5 November 2018: School inspections in England: Ofsted

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07091, 5 November 2018: School inspections in England: Ofsted

At the moment, we are investigating with one hand tied behind our back. We desperately need appropriate powers to search for and seize evidence, so that we can close these schools down. These powers can only come through legislation and we are glad that the government has pledged to review our powers in a recent green paper.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07388, 19 December 2018: Language teaching in schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07388, 19 December 2018: Language teaching in schools (England)

It is no surprise, therefore, that there is low take-up in these subjects at GCSE. Some pupils told inspectors that they were not taking these [English Baccalaureate] EBacc subjects at Key Stage 4 because they did not enjoy them or had found them difficult at Key Stage 3, particularly MFL. A small number made an explicit link between their choices and the quality of teaching that they had received at Key Stage 3. This is a serious concern given the government’s ambition for all pupils starting Year 7 in September 2015 to take the EBacc subjects when they reach their GCSEs in 2020. Improving the Key Stage 3 provision in these subjects will be crucial to raising the EBacc success rate in the coming years. 7
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