Top PDF Communicating Emotion in Design: The studio experience

Communicating Emotion in Design: The studio experience

Communicating Emotion in Design: The studio experience

The studio model thus represents an approach to teaching and learning that is both personal and social where learning outcomes are results of individual creations as well as social interactions. The model, moreover, offers substantial pedagogic freedom, including improvisation and play, which stimulates imagination and formation of emotions, as experienced by students in set studio projects. Such rich and authentic learning experiences where students immediately and intuitively find real emotions arising reflect how followers in the creative arts have ‘an intensely personal relationship with their subject’ (Micklethwaite, 2005:92). Personalised learning and social interaction, furthermore, can help students develop meta-cognitive awareness (Flavell, 1979), or ‘meta-emotion’ (Gottman et. al., 1997) that enable them to step back and take the necessary critical view of their own work as a means to change. Through processes of reflection, then, students gain self-knowledge and become more conscious of their ways of thinking and how they channel and manage their emotional energies.
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Dialogue and studio space: the architectural design studio as the setting for continuous reflection

Dialogue and studio space: the architectural design studio as the setting for continuous reflection

equipped with the cultural capital, or the personal confidence to engage in dialogical learning, come to recognise her potential agency in shaping her educational experience and feel empowered to sustain the level of dialogue offered by contemporary discourses in the design studio? The case study of the First Year project described above aimed to outline the curricular processes conducive to the attainment of insights in how personal experience, from any background, can be seen as formative to the construction of disciplinary literacy in the field of architecture through a staged, multi-voiced and level-specific induction into professional dialogue. In this process, the role of the studio facilitator has been described as just one of many voices within the cultural environment of architecture education that can offer a formative experience of reflective dialogue. Workshop technicians, makers from other creative fields and not lastly their student peers can all be seen to facilitate for meaningful opportunities for questioning assumptions, learning and unlearning about what it means to be an empowered student of architecture. (Still more voices are joining the dialogical choir as learners progress towards a ‘social’ understanding of architectural practice). While the curriculum that leads to professional qualification is set by the school of architecture and the principal reference point for the attainment of professional knowledge remains the studio tutor, the nature of the dialogues architecture students encounter in Higher Education are wide-ranging and diverse. Consequently, agency is seen as virtue, constructed in many settings and co-authored by many voices. The task of the studio tutor is to accept and promote the many other voices that enter and shape the studio experience. The studio space is but the central hub where these experiences can be subject to a reflective process that trains learners to build further insights en route to the practitioners they choose to become. The focal point of the dialogical learning experience is the physical setting of the studio which offers continuity through all stages of the learner’s development. In the specific context described in the paper the aim is to coherently guide the student’s journey toward a professional agency by offering opportunities for reflective, multi-voiced dialogue across the different teaching provision of whole- year and vertical studio delivery of studio teaching.
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Community design studio: a collaboration of architects and psychologists

Community design studio: a collaboration of architects and psychologists

creative dialogue identifying responsible and professionally informed plans for the renewal of an inner city area in Glasgow (Govanhill) in which community participation was an essential ingredient. The collaboration took the form of architecture students, as designers and environmental psychology students as consultants, communicating electronically between Guildford (University of Surrey) and Glasgow (University of Strathclyde) and then meeting for on-site project work in London and Glasgow. The local community in Glasgow was the client for the architecture students, as the commissioner of ideas for neighbourhood regeneration. This interdisciplinary collaboration took place over nine months and generated educational, social and professional capital and challenges for both groups of young professionals. It involved long-distance collaboration through a virtual-studio with limited direct contacts; the responsibility of dealing with a ‘real’ client; and the cultural diversity of the two disciplines with different curricula, philosophy, teaching styles and learning outcomes. This experience also suggests potential ways to overcome the obstacles encountered in professional/community as well as inter-disciplinary collaboration and cooperation, and advocates the educational and social utility of such collaboration.
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The 'Studio' conundrum: making sense of the Australasian experience in Architectural Education

The 'Studio' conundrum: making sense of the Australasian experience in Architectural Education

Essentially, design studio teaching is thought to reflect the constructivists’ perspective, which proposes that the student constructs and determines their own learning. However, this categorisation is dependent on the approach taken by the facilitator or tutor with the students. Project-based learning is the main approach employed in teaching architectural design (Webster 2004a, Ashton 1997). This approach requires a continual process of critical reflection by the learner and input by others (tutor, peers and external critics). The ultimate goal is to allow the learner to develop a level of confidence to undertake self-directed inquiry and problem solving to generate appropriate and creative solutions. Research into project and problem-based learning does not solicit much information regarding the role of the physical learning environment in student learning. It recommended the space for students to work was more than a classroom or reading space, it needed to allow for a multiplicity of activities, resources and ways to learn individually, in small groups or with the class (Chambers 2007, Adderley et al 1975). There was no explicit link made between the quality of the physical learning environment to improve student interaction and dialogue, which is critical to project, and problem based learning.
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Exploration of Climate Change in Architectural Design Studio

Exploration of Climate Change in Architectural Design Studio

First four weeks, students conducted an intensive research on climate change and low carbon emissions. Before they visit the site in Urla, they excavated all historical and technical information about the surrounding. They checked whether there is any initiative about climate change ideas. There were three institutions; one is an underwater archaeological team from Ankara University, second is shipping technologies group from Dokuz Eylül University, and third group is aqua cultural engineering from Ege University. All the activities of these institutions provided necessary conditions for innovative design solutions.
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MIS 3504 Digital Design and Innovation Studio

MIS 3504 Digital Design and Innovation Studio

Seven Steps Chp 2 Jogger 43 - 49 Disfunctional Warehouse Case Class 2.3 Class 2.4 3 Process Flow Swim lane Flowchart. Assign Sales Order Case, develop process flow and design D[r]

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How To Pay Pabodie Design Studio For A Website

How To Pay Pabodie Design Studio For A Website

Studios under this agreement and upon payment in full are the property of the Client, and all right, title, and  interest therein shall vest in Client and shall be deemed a "work mad[r]

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The Digital Design Studio, Glasgow School of Art

The Digital Design Studio, Glasgow School of Art

Digital Design Studio Overview Expertise Skills Visualisation Future Mark Milne.. Digital Design Studio Overview Expertise Skills Visualisation Future Mark Milne.[r]

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The learning design studio: collaborative design inquiry as teachers' professional development

The learning design studio: collaborative design inquiry as teachers' professional development

Reflection on the process as a whole, one student noted: ‘‘It took a long way to accomplish the goal. It wasn’t easy to design such a learning space. It was big effort for us to transfer the general ideas we had in mind into real ones. We feel that we got useful and practical tools during the ‘mobile learning’ course for doing the design

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Design Studio Evaluation Discussions in Digital Age

Design Studio Evaluation Discussions in Digital Age

In accordance with the results of the questionnaire carried out with the students, the students believe that they are mostly encouraged to use HDR techniques both during their last semester studio and during their entire education. But on the other hand when the results are analyzed for every studio semester chronologically another interesting alternation in their point of view is observed. A drastic increase in the ratio of the CDR technique can be visualized. This result is also confirmed by the questionnaire carried out with the graduate studio students. They tend to use computers more commonly both for the design process and presentations. This change will be reasoned by the ascending computer knowledge of the students gained by the courses related with computer education in the curriculum. Another motivation will be their ascending professional life experience by the help of the internship and training courses. Also computer aided design systems’ advantages in mastering the complexity will be another reason for preferring these techniques in latter studio semesters.
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How To Use Cadd In An Architectural Design Studio

How To Use Cadd In An Architectural Design Studio

16 schools of architecture is required with a clear distinction between regular courses and components integrated into studio and practical courses. The professional bodies regulating the training and administration of the profession should be more proactive by further developing their websites. The NIA Journal and the Architects Registration Council of Nigeria (ARCON) do not have websites, while the architects' professional body, the Nigerian Institute of Architects (NIA) and the Association of Architectural Educators in Nigeria (AARCHES) have very poorly maintained websites. Yet these are the potential places visited often in the process of e-learning. ( Prucnal-Ogunsote, B and Ude O.A. 2008). In securing a future for the architecture industry, educators must respond to changes in technology, management, service orientation, and the legal recognition of the profession. Universities and other higher institutions should therefore study these options and lead the way in by equipping graduates with abilities to use applications that will offer professional practices with various choices that best suit the design and construction industry. Software simulation tools, which fall under the innovative use of computers, such as DOE 2/DOE 2.2 by James J. Hirsch (JJH), BLAST, FRAME, ESim, LightSim etcc help architects solve complex decisions involving many performance considerations, such as comfort, energy requirements, code compliance, environmental impact, aesthetic appeal etc to achieve a sustainable and ecological friendly building design. These types of CAAD software and teaching should be introduced in the near future in order for Nigerian architecture graduate to be on the cutting edge of technology. (Mohd-Nor, M.F.I., Usman, I.M.S. and Mazlan-Tahir, M. (2009)T he curriculum of architecture programs should reflect both contemporary and future trends for society and industry in computer use.
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Design for 'quality of use' : emotion and physical interface design

Design for 'quality of use' : emotion and physical interface design

With recent technological developments in motion capture there is an opportunity to redefine the physical interactions we have with products, considering human needs in movement at the forefront rather than subservient to the machine. This paper reports on the exploration of emotional reaction to gestural interface design using Laban’s Movement Analysis from the field of dance and drama. After outlining the current status of Gesture Controlled User Interfaces and why the use of Laban is appropriate to help understand the effects of movement, the results of a workshop on new interface design are presented. Teams were asked to re-imagine a number of product experiences that utilised appropriate Laban effort actions and to prototype and present these to the group. Several categories of devices, including direct manipulation, remote control and gesture recognition were identified. In aligning appropriate movements to device functionality, utilising culture and analogy and where necessary increasing complexity, the interfaces embody a number of concepts relating to gestural interface concepts.
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Collaborative Design Studio on Trial: A Conceptual Framework in Practice

Collaborative Design Studio on Trial: A Conceptual Framework in Practice

mester. Meanwhile, the maximum number of members in sub groups was four. As a result, appropriate coopera- tion and interaction has been generated between the participants in relation to the overall intensity of the col- laborative project. Furthermore, the results show that it was possible for one main instructor to manage and conduct the collaborative design studio, so there was no need for presence of more instructors in the case study. Regarding the questionnaire item that are related to process parameter, there was a considerable result that indi- cates most of the students (63%) agreed with the high social interaction in sub groups. However, since the par- ticipants decided about their partners and roles in design process, sub groups were more successful in compari- son to the main collaborative group in which the students had not the choice of selecting their peers prior to the commencement of the collaborative studio. Furthermore, regarding the place factor, a great number of the par- ticipants (52%) denoted that they did not have access to the collaborative studio on a daily basis because there were other design studios scheduled in the same physical setting in different days. Moreover, the physical attrib- utes of the collaborative studio did not offer participants an adequate area for collaborative work. Similarly, the students noted the lack of a permanent and fulltime allocated location for the collaborative design during the semester.
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Virtual DSP System Design Using Visual Studio

Virtual DSP System Design Using Visual Studio

Jadi, arah rancangan projek ini adalah untuk membangunkan satu sistem DSP dengan menggunakan Visual Studio dan Measurement Studio tools, di mana fungsi sistem ini termasuk pemprosesan signal digital melalui empat pilihan algoritma. Tools akan digunakan untuk menunjukkan input dan output signal bagi pengguna sistem menggambarkan proses dalaman DSP. Skop projek ini akan menumpukan penggunaan Visual Basic sebagai bahasa program dan bahan Measurement Studio untuk menunjukkan data informasi di dalam GUI.

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Katerina Ann DESIGN & PHOTOGRAPHY STUDIO. Services & Pricing

Katerina Ann DESIGN & PHOTOGRAPHY STUDIO. Services & Pricing

While I have a lot of experience editing images, I pride myself on not having to. My reason for this is that when you look back on your images you want to remember them exactly they are. Not over edited where you can barely recognize yourself or the moment.

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AP Studio Art: 3-D Design Syllabus

AP Studio Art: 3-D Design Syllabus

The class will meet five days a week for 48 minutes for a full year. Before and after school studio times will be available for all students to have time for success. Open studio nights will be at least once a week until 4:30 p.m. Field trips into the community to visit art and artists will be a part of the student’s experience and education. Artists will also be invited into the school studio. Students will be required to keep a sketchbook/journal to record his/her ideas and investigations. Professional publications, books and online virtual tours of museums and galleries will be part of the student’s investigative assignments. The student will be asked to research and explore the history of art, and artists. They will be asked to research styles, ideations, materials and techniques and how the history of art inspire and influence us and other contemporary art. However the student will be taught to understand artistic integrity and to understand the difference between inspiration and plagiarism. He or she will be expected to adhere to an ethical standard and practice. They will know the difference between being inspired by an artist and plagiarizing an artist or work of art. Students will be encouraged to find their own voice while admiring and gleaning from the wealth of art that is around us and preceded us.
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An Investigation of the Design and Execution of Large Scale Studio Paintings

An Investigation of the Design and Execution of Large Scale Studio Paintings

Rochester Institute of Technology RIT Scholar Works Theses Thesis/Dissertation Collections 5-1-1978 An Investigation of the Design and Execution of Large Scale Studio Paintings Dennis Mo[r]

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Emotion in Consumption Experience of Social Support; a Phenomenological Perspectives

Emotion in Consumption Experience of Social Support; a Phenomenological Perspectives

In this modern world where the social relation is more vulnerable due to daily activities, value, conflicts and time management, getting satisfaction through experiential consumption is at risk. When Caru & Cova (2007) described consuming experiences is not limited to the market, but it applies to an individual’s daily life with and without market relation, this reflects perfectly to the life experiences of the elderly. It is because elderly consume more than we can ever imagine in their entire life and they would be the most required group who are believed to be able to explain deeply on consumption experiences. There would be some various dimension to look into consumer behavior but for today, superior customers’ consumption experience become a priority (Rajagopal & Castano, 2015). Consumption experience has been studied on a perception (Li, Dong, & Chen, 2012) and yet to be explored on customers experience or actual behavior. Considering an elderly is rich with experiences throughout their life, understanding consumption experience thru their life experiences of emotion is deem required. Triantafillidou and Siomkos (2014a) have measured various emotional experiences through satisfaction, nostalgia intensity, word of mouth communication and behavioral intention but a deep understanding of it was suggested to be studied. Moreover, the ill-defined of consumption experience (Carù & Cova, 2003a) require more understanding of the concept especially limited in social support consumption.
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The development of an emotion lexicon for the coffee drinking experience

The development of an emotion lexicon for the coffee drinking experience

Positive emotions seemed to be driven by cocoa aroma, bitter, tobacco, roast, burnt, and body/mouthfeel. Cocoa aroma may elevate good and pleasant emotions, which was consistent with previous studies. King & Meiselman (2009) found that among the five food categories evaluated, chocolate was reported to have the highest ratings for 15 of the positive emotions (out of 24 positive emotions on a list of 39 terms). Macht & Mueller (2007) reported consumption of chocolate to immediately reduce negative mood state, although the effect was temporary. It is also a common knowledge that chocolate and its resemblance usually induce positive feelings in a general population. Tobacco (flavor and aroma) evoked the feelings of jolted and content. Coffee users may initially be surprised (i.e., jolted) by the unfamiliar tobacco attribute that was not commonly found in all coffee (only one coffee sample in this study exhibited this sensory attribute). However, they were accepting of the experience (i.e., content), which indicate that having a tobacco attribute in coffee could potentially enhance the drinking experience for general coffee users. Bitter aroused energetic and productive feelings. Roast and burnt (flavor and aroma), and body texture made consumers feel jump start, satisfied, boosted, and special. On the contrary, citrus, hay-like, and acidity appeared to elicit off-balance feeling. Similar to
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Attachments to nature : design and eco-emotion

Attachments to nature : design and eco-emotion

nature (e.g. in wilderness) define their personal emotional attachment to nature. Milton pursues this work with a social anthropological aim - understanding people. She wishes to know why some people come to value nature more than others. That is, why in the west, some people form very strong emotional attachments to nature and go to extremes to protect it, and other people view nature as a resource with no emotional relationship. Critically, she shows that people can construct strong emotional attachments to nature through social relationships and through direct relationships with nature. With reference to the holistic model above, this implies that eco-emotions can be constructed through socio-emotional and eco-emotional experience. She highlights, that individuals with strong emotional attachments to nature are much more likely to protect nature than those without such an attachment. In the conclusion of ‘Loving Nature’, she argues that our western culture of economic development is one which does not promote an emotional relationship with nature and proposes that ‘a full recognition of the emotional basis of all our actions might help broaden the parameters of public discourse’ (Milton 2002: 151).
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