Top PDF Communication Beginnings: An Introductory Listening and Speaking Text for English Language Learners

Communication Beginnings: An Introductory Listening and Speaking Text for English Language Learners

Communication Beginnings: An Introductory Listening and Speaking Text for English Language Learners

Kaori is an English learner from Japan. She is in her first semester at a university in the U.S. state of Oregon. She is very excited to be learning English. In class, Kaori feels a little shy and mostly sits by another Japanese student. Together they translate words and talk in Japanese during the break. Sometimes her teacher calls her name to answer questions, but otherwise, Kaori doesn’t raise her hand or speak much during class. She is afraid of making a mistake when she speaks. On the weekends, Kaori chats with her family in Japan and watches movies in Japanese on the computer. Kaori has been in the United States for two months now, but she doesn’t feel like her speaking and listening skills are improving. She is disappointed.
Show more

97 Read more

Communication Beginnings: An Introductory Listening and Speaking Text for English Language Learners

Communication Beginnings: An Introductory Listening and Speaking Text for English Language Learners

Kaori is an English learner from Japan. She is in her first semester at a university in the U.S. state of Oregon. She is very excited to be learning English. In class, Kaori feels a little shy and mostly sits by another Japanese student. Together they translate words and talk in Japanese during the break. Sometimes her teacher calls her name to answer questions, but otherwise, Kaori doesn’t raise her hand or speak much during class. She is afraid of making a mistake when she speaks. On the weekends, Kaori chats with her family in Japan and watches movies in Japanese on the computer. Kaori has been in the United States for two months now, but she doesn’t feel like her speaking and listening skills are improving. She is disappointed.
Show more

99 Read more

The Effect of Using Communicative Language Teaching on Developing English Speaking and Listening Skills of Iranian Secondary School Students

The Effect of Using Communicative Language Teaching on Developing English Speaking and Listening Skills of Iranian Secondary School Students

The communicative classroom has come to have characteristics that differentiate it from the non-communicative classroom. Basically, it is an environment where "features of genuine communication are evident" (Gullen, 1998, P.1). A communicative classroom according to Taylor (1983), requires an atmosphere which "encourage[s] learners to exercise their own initiative in communicating" and "in which communication can take place comfortably". Communicative activities have an important role in creating opportunities for students to use the language for communicative purposes. Generally, communicative activities are "fluency-based activities" (Trait, 2001, p.1) which encourage meaningful and purposeful interaction between students, where they bridge an information or opinion gaps, ask for or give real information, find out about the opinions of the other students, etc.(Gower et al . 1995; & Harmer, 2003).
Show more

11 Read more

Technology Enhanced Language Learning on English Communication for EFL Learners

Technology Enhanced Language Learning on English Communication for EFL Learners

Abstract :- Global advanced technology era is the most significant role for world population using Online Social Network (OSN) increasingly. It can be applied to multi-functioning purposes which are more essential for their life any situations for instance their society, study, and work. The integration of technology and English practicing skills has a lot good benefits for them to promote English communication among EFL learners. They are motivated and encouraged to practice their English skills more fluently and effectively. They also have good attitudes toward using the technology in their learning. Most of them are able to communicate in English with each other around the world. They also learn more culture and lifestyles in any foreign countries, especially in ASEAN countries. Thailand is one of the members in ASEAN Community that Thais need to communicate in English as a working language. They have to use English for their study and work in Thailand and other countries. It's very necessary to help them communicating in English direct oral conversations related to real work life with these foreigners rapidly. This article describes that Technology Enhanced Language Learning (TELL) impacts EFL learners as social media to improve their English communication. The Internet acts as an efficient tool to enhance language acquisition in English learning. Most of them use a lot of applications via smart phones for their English lifelong learning anywhere anytime. TELL assists them to practice more English communication skills which are important for their study and work life. They enable to learn all English such as vocabulary, grammar, expression, conversation, message, etc. They also develop their English communication skills; listening, speaking, reading, and writing any situations. They will be able to communicate with Asians in English for further work in ASEAN Community effectively. They will cooperate to do business for ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) in the future successfully.
Show more

9 Read more

Psychological Factor Affecting English Speaking Performance for the English Learners in Indonesia

Psychological Factor Affecting English Speaking Performance for the English Learners in Indonesia

Abstract In every learning situation or environment, human psychology plays a significant role. English speaking is a language skill that is highly affected by human psychology. This research aimed at describing the psychological factor that affects negatively the English speaking performance for the English learners in Indonesia. A descriptive qualitative design was used to conduct this research. The research was consisted of theoretical review, field notes, observations, and unstructured interviews. The participants were 20 students. The data were analyzed using the interactive analysis technique developed by Miles and Huberman (1994). The results of the research reveal that the psychological factor truly affects negatively the students’ English speaking performance. Although most of the students think that they have good level of English vocabulary and grammar, they are insecure while speaking English. Most of the problems were (1) Fear of making mistakes (2) Feeling shy (3) Feeling hesitated (4) lack of confidence while speaking English. Finally, some suggestions expected to be significant remedies to overcome the problem were proposed by the researcher.
Show more

5 Read more

Version 2: This version indicates new arrangements for Speaking and Listening for assessment from WJEC GCSE in English Language

Version 2: This version indicates new arrangements for Speaking and Listening for assessment from WJEC GCSE in English Language

There is no prescribed time limit for teaching and learning when preparing the text. However, QCDA have suggested that the preparation time for an assignment should be about 15 hours for a unit worth 20% of the final mark. This means that the English Language Studying Written Language and Using Language controlled assessment assignments could each be given about 11 hours of preparation time, and the Studying Spoken Language assignment about 8 hours. However, it is unlikely that the Using Language tasks will require so much time. During this period, the candidates can make suitable notes on their texts (Studying Written and Spoken Language). At this stage the candidates will be able to consult their notes and the texts and any other relevant material. Worksheets and scaffolding are not permitted. The final assessment session may be arranged in a number of ways. Candidates will have a maximum of two hours to complete their Studying Written Language assignment and a total of two hours for the Using Language essays. They have two hours for their Studying Spoken Language. This time may be broken into shorter sessions to fit into the lesson schedule. Alternatively, teachers may wish to arrange an assessment session in the school/college hall. The latter approach would have the advantage of ensuring that all the candidates complete their work under the same conditions. During the final assessment period, candidates are permitted to have with them one A4 sheet of notes for the reading assessment (see p.13), a "clean" copy of the literature text and research notes and texts in the Spoken Language unit. Once the assessment session is complete, candidates are not permitted to resubmit work. They may not take into the session any other notes – with the exception of Studying Spoken Language, where research notes are allowed. Given that the time limit is relatively short, candidates will need to be focused on task from the onset of their writing. The controlled assessment regulations state that ‘Mark schemes must provide suitable credit for precision and succinctness of expression’. Candidates who spend time on extraneous aspects, like biographical details in the Studying Written Language, will put themselves at a disadvantage. The assessment objectives for this part of the course require the students to ‘Explain and evaluate how writers use linguistic, grammatical, structural and presentational features to achieve effects’ and they are expected to support their comments with ‘detailed textual references’.
Show more

43 Read more

Succeeding With English Language Learners:

Succeeding With English Language Learners:

However, such across-the-board district reform efforts do not automatically or inevitably lead to high-quality ELL programming. Districts that saw improvement of their ELL instructional program—and of ELL student achievement— demonstrated the capacity and the political will to explicitly address the academic needs of English Language Learners. To this end, these districts often seized on external forces such as court orders, federal requirements, and state audits as an opportunity to pursue meaningful, systemic reform on behalf of ELLs. These reform efforts involved the mind- ful adoption of pedagogical strategies for advancing second language acquisition. Alignment of curriculum and instruc- tion for ELLs in these districts was a defining feature of re- form efforts, but it was dependent on equipping ELLs with the academic literacy skills necessary to access grade-level content. To support this focus on continuous language ac- quisition, improving districts implemented professional de- velopment initiatives that were both targeted in their focus on literacy development, and broad in their applicability to teachers of ELLs across the curriculum.
Show more

82 Read more

STRATEGIES OF LEARNING SPEAKING SKILL BY INDONESIAN LEARNERS OF ENGLISH AND THEIR CONTRIBUTION TO SPEAKING PROFICIENCY

STRATEGIES OF LEARNING SPEAKING SKILL BY INDONESIAN LEARNERS OF ENGLISH AND THEIR CONTRIBUTION TO SPEAKING PROFICIENCY

When the relative importance of each strategy type was analyzed using re- gression analysis, cognitive interaction maintenance strategies, self- improvement strategies, and compensation strategies were found to provide positive contribution to speaking skill, with the first strategy type being the most significant predictor. On the other hand, memory strategies were found to contribute negatively, in the sense that memorization may distract the devel- opment of speaking skill. These findings indicate that not all learning strategies positively contribute to learning success in speaking skill; consequently, it is essential for teachers to encourage particularly male learners to use the appro- priate strategies to attain success in learning English speaking by explicitly in- corporating strategies-based instruction (SBI) covering the three influential strategies in the classroom. Cohen (2000) points out that strategies-based in- struction offers students with benefits such as directing them to accomplish task efficiently, promoting autonomous learning outside the classroom, and building confidence in learning and using the target language. In speaking con- text, some studies (Cohen, 2000; Cohen, Weaver, & Li, 1996; Nakatani, 2006) have highlighted the significantly positive effect of integrating strategies-based instruction on the improvement of students’ oral performance.
Show more

14 Read more

Task-specific Artifacts of Parametric Properties in English as a Second Language Acquired by Persian-Speaking Learners

Task-specific Artifacts of Parametric Properties in English as a Second Language Acquired by Persian-Speaking Learners

The samples of the study include a total of 30 university freshman students who are majoring in Persian literature, social sciences, Arabic, psychology and law in Guilan University (14 males and 16 females aging erom from 19 to 27). They were randomly selected based on the results of a quick Oxford Placement test (Version 2, 2001) administered to the population of the freshman students in the Faculty of Humanities in Guilan University exceeding 150 taking General English course. In the meantime, a questionnaire was used to specify the start age of the subjects (to examine whether the start age of L2 acquisition can bring about any significant difference with respect to clustering appearance of linguistic phenomena). According to the results, the population could be divided into three proficiency levels of either early or late starters, that is, pre-intermediate, intermediate and advanced levels. So, the sample also representing the population is divided into three proficiency levels so that each group may include 10 learners. Moreover, based on the questionnaire, half of the members in each group consists of early starters to learn English, aging about 7 years old, the other half consists of late starters to learn English, aging about 13 years old. The questionnaire also helps eradicate possible intervening variables such as bilingualism. In order to familiarize the subjects with the lexical items used in the experiment they were provided with a word list of all the items used in the experiment, at least three days before the actual experiments were carried out. 4.2. Materials
Show more

15 Read more

The Use of Podcast to Improve Students’ Listening and Speaking Skills for EFL Learners

The Use of Podcast to Improve Students’ Listening and Speaking Skills for EFL Learners

From the study, it is convinced that the application of podcast in English skills such as listening and speaking contribute a lot to give some improvement for both teacher and students. Teacher can bring ICT into the classroom practices, in the same time teacher is able to improve the technology skill in other to create the teaching atmosphere in the 21st century. For student’s podcast provides students’ learning styles, they might change their way to practice listening, increase vocabulary level, grammatical sentence, intonation, and imitate pronunciation. Those activities directly raise their motivation and willingness to apply their learning styles because it is more interesting and flexible to study. While students improve their language competence, they can also focus on the input. The more students listen various topics from podcast based on their interest, the more they store rich ideas and information that might be very important sources in performing speaking and even writing.
Show more

10 Read more

Listening is essential for English Language Learning

Listening is essential for English Language Learning

India is a multilingual country having many languages, but all of them have their own Science, Grammar and technology. The great Grammarian, Panini and his contribution for language Grammar, can never be forgotten. Although nearly three fourth of people speak more than one language, but English introduced in 1759 after the introduction of the East India company in India. Now English has become the official language of India. But the present scenario of English speaking is really a sensitive one.
Show more

5 Read more

An Empirical Study on College English Listening-Speaking Multilevel Matching

An Empirical Study on College English Listening-Speaking Multilevel Matching

From September, 2017 to September, 2018, 30 non-English major students who were enrolled in The Northwestern Polytechnical University in 2017 participated in this research. According to their pre-school test (the one held at the beginning of the college life, to classify students into different language levels, which has high similarity to CET-4 and the validity and reliability has been proved high), 15 students belong to normal level (the score is below 63) and 15 belong to advanced level (the score is above 64), and no one belongs to the excellent level (the top 400 among 3500 students). All data was collected in normal class time so to avoid any unnecessary negative effects on participants’ performance. The instructor of the participants, female, has been teaching for more than 5 years in this university.
Show more

10 Read more

Language of the English-speaking Coloured child

Language of the English-speaking Coloured child

1. The elicitation of language samples within representational, imaginative and interactional functions of language. Tests of those areas in which the Ss had used non-standard varia[r]

17 Read more

Processing of Lexical Bundles by Persian Speaking Learners of English

Processing of Lexical Bundles by Persian Speaking Learners of English

Recurrent clusters construct a substantial proportion of almost all discourse types and it is the strong tendency of any natural language to use them. As shown, at least one third to one-half of language is composed of different types of such structures (Erman & Warren, 2000; Forster, 2001; Howarth, 1998). Erman and Warren (2000) showed that 50% of spoken and written language includes such recurrent clusters. Also, the Google Web IT data base, which consists of approximately one trillion word tokens of text found on publicly accessible web pages, lists approximately 79 million formulaic sequences of five words. As corpus linguistics has demonstrated, formulacity appears in natural language and plays a significant role in the way it is acquired, processed, and used (Miller, 2010; Nattinger & DeCarrico, 1992; Peters, 1983; Wray, 2002).
Show more

18 Read more

Capitalizing on Speaking Skill of EFL Learners for the Language Literacy

Capitalizing on Speaking Skill of EFL Learners for the Language Literacy

According to Siddiqui (2012) ‘English is a foreign language in Oman and its use is limited to certain educational and professional contexts. It is taught as one of the subjects in the public school curriculum. However, the medium of instruction of other subjects still remains Arabic’. The school graduates and many other adult learners who seek enrolment in foreign universities have to give the evidence of their English language proficiency because most of these Universities’s syllabus and the medium of teaching is English. The proficiency level requirement depends on the University or the Course. Most of these universities accept IELTS results (see appendix for IELTS Test level descriptors). Equal weight is given to each skill in this test that includes listening, speaking, reading, and writing and the total band (score) is the average of all the skills.
Show more

6 Read more

The comprehension and production of later developing language constructions by Afrikaans-, English- and isiXhosa-speaking Grade 1 learners

The comprehension and production of later developing language constructions by Afrikaans-, English- and isiXhosa-speaking Grade 1 learners

participants experience and perceive the research itself. The effectiveness of the research is thus dependent on all associated with the research, as it is a collaborative endeavour. For this reason, the value systems and perceptions that each fieldworker has, and how others perceive the fieldworkers, must be taken into account. This is especially true when considering the abovementioned history of South Africa and the fact that a previously advantaged white female (in terms of socioeconomics as well as education) is the main researcher in previously disadvantaged coloured and black communities. My cultural practices differ from those of the communities involved and I attended a different school system to the one in which the participants find themselves. For the above reasons, as far as it was possible, Afrikaans- speaking coloured fieldworkers were employed to collect data in the Afrikaans-medium school and Xhosa researchers were employed in the isiXhosa- and English-medium schools. (The majority of the Gr 1 learners in the English-medium school had low levels of English proficiency and were of Xhosa descent.) Even though it is frowned upon to make such racial and ethnical distinctions, it was imperative in the case of this study, (i) because I wanted to employ fieldworkers who speak the language of the particular community as L1 (and in South Africa, language and dialect to a large extent still fall along racial and ethnic lines) and (ii) I am aware that the history of discrimination still has consequences in the socio-political landscape of South Africa today, and as such I needed to employ fieldworkers who could act as cultural brokers on my behalf. Not considering racial, ethnic and linguistic distinctions could have affected the quality of the collected data negatively.
Show more

378 Read more

Speaking and Listening Materials

Speaking and Listening Materials

Barrier games focus on giving and receiving instructions in order to complete a task. They involve careful listening and giving clear, explicit instructions. The speaker has to provide clear instructions for the listener. The listener has to ask questions, clarify understanding and gain information in order to complete the task. A barrier can be used e.g. a screen, to separate the speaker and listener while the instructions are being given.

6 Read more

Developing common listening ability scales for Chinese learners of English

Developing common listening ability scales for Chinese learners of English

language ability scales was realized when Han (2006) did a comprehensive review of some influential language ability scales in the world, with the CEFR as the most representative one. Han ended his review with a call for nationally unified English teaching standards that would help to link different educational stages in China. Based on the CEFR, Yang and Gui (2007) proposed the idea of developing a common Asian framework of reference for English, in light of the fact that English is the working language among Asian coun- tries. Following the mushrooming of the CEFR-related studies, Chinese scholars have tried to follow the CEFR approach and develop a common language ability scale for Chinese learners. Fang et al. (2008) discussed the principles and steps involved in developing a national English ability scale in the Chinese context. In their discussion they covered some key elements of the CEFR approach such as a descriptive scheme based on communicative language ability, “ can-do ” statement style, action-oriented approach and empirical data scaling method. Following that, there have been two more papers, introducing the theoretical underpinnings of the CEFR. Fang et al. (2011) did an in- depth investigation of the “can-do” description style, and Liu et al. (2012) discussed the CEFR’s successful application of the communicative language ability (CLA) frame- work within the illustrative scales and its advanced language teaching philosophy.
Show more

12 Read more

Linguistic and Cognitive Measures in Arabic-Speaking English Language Learners (ELLs) and monolingual children with and without Developmental Language Disorder (DLD)

Linguistic and Cognitive Measures in Arabic-Speaking English Language Learners (ELLs) and monolingual children with and without Developmental Language Disorder (DLD)

ELLs account for 16 to 36% of the elementary school population in large urban centers in Canada (Statistics Canada, http://www.statcan.ca), and 10% of the elementary school population in the United States (National Center for Education Statistics [NCES], 2006). ELLs who speak a minority language at home, and who are in the process of learning English as a second language (L2) through contact with the majority societal language, are L1 minority L2 learners. The developmental course of L1 and L2 acquisition amongst ELLs is highly variable and dependent on a number of factors. For example, the age of exposure to the languages is important (Paradis et al., 2011): ELLs who are exposed to two languages early in their life, at least before 3 years of age, have different degrees of familiarity with L1 and L2 than ELLs who begin the acquisition of L2 later in life or after establishing their L1 (Paradis et al., 2011). Broadly speaking, bilingual children who are exposed to two languages and who begin to learn them before 3 years of age are expected to be more fluent speakers of both languages than bilingual children who begin the acquisition of a second language after 3 years of age (Paradis et al., 2004). Another factor is related to ongoing exposure: ELLs from L1 minorities receive little community support for their L1, as such, their opportunities to hear and use their first language may decrease especially once ELLs start schooling (Anderson, 2012; Paradis et al., 2010). ELLs from minority L1, therefore, are likely to be at risk for loss and/or incomplete acquisition of their L1 (Anderson, 2012; Paradis, 2010). Understanding ELLs’ language development and how ELLs acquire specific linguistic skills is important not only for understanding child development, but also for identifying factors that may influence the course of ELLs’ development.
Show more

174 Read more

FIRST CERTIFICATE Reading and Use of English Writing Listening Speaking Reading:

FIRST CERTIFICATE Reading and Use of English Writing Listening Speaking Reading:

For Parts 5 to 7 , you read a series of texts and answer questions that test your reading ability and show that you can deal with a variety of different types of texts.. Texts may be fr[r]

17 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...