Top PDF Community Capacity Building in Social Forestry Development: A Review

Community Capacity Building in Social Forestry Development: A Review

Community Capacity Building in Social Forestry Development: A Review

The Ministry of Forestry has established a system of social forestry implemented through the Community Based Forest Management (CBFM) model. The concept of CBFM is asocial forestry practice according to a new paradigm of forest development that is more reliant on public interest (especially of forest communities) through a collaborative approach, where the local community is a main actor in forest development. The purpose of the collaborative approach is to achieve sustainability of the forests’ functions and benefits (sustainable forest management), which is implemented through cooperation with various stakeholders. Based on the objectives and approach, a number of principles of social forestry practice can be distinguished in the CBFM model, namely: (1) collaboration or partnership, which requires the equality of parties (stakeholders); (2) understanding the role of each party; (3) sharing of inputs and outputs among stakeholders. Inputs include shared spaces of the forest area, or the means of production, including labor costs; (4) balance of economic and environmental benefits; (5) legality or rule of law (Ministry of Forestry, 2010). The CBFM model consists of six principles, namely: (1) CBFM is a system of forest management; (2) it is intended to increase the quality of life; (3) it is intended to improve the quality of the environment, particularly of forest resources; (4) it should recognize and be respectful towards diverse initiatives; (5) it should encourage multi-stakeholder collaborative processes; and (6) it should be supported by government policies. As a system, CBFM should include the balance of environmental, economic, social and cultural benefits (Arnold, 1991). The principles of social forestry should be fully implemented in forest management practice.
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Promoting professional identity development: community capacity building in early childhood education across the local context

Promoting professional identity development: community capacity building in early childhood education across the local context

Within the USQ local context, the CoP here is very much emergent and needs to be seen as a ‘work in progress’. This paper has attempted to capture the essence of the experience of developing and implementing this professional development approach in terms of pedagogical connectedness. The overall perceptions from the feedback, from academic staff and students alike, is that this innovation is proving very successful and is assisting students to grow and develop both personally and professionally, demonstrating the future possibilities for enhancing social capital within the ECE field. With a strong focus on process, together staff and students work closely as a CoP to experiment, try out ideas, take risks, tackle and puzzle over problems, think, reflect, listen, discuss, ask questions and surprise themselves and one another. This will allow them to continually connect with pedagogy in ways that enable them, rather than constrain them, on their journeys of professional identity development in addition to their engagement with the more formal curriculum. Further research will also focus on the important influence that pre-service training (induction) can have on the professional growth and development that a graduate experiences once they have commenced their career. Through the ECE CoP it is hoped that these practitioners will remain committed to this critically reflective process and continue to be socially and professionally connected to this strategy. This would allow for ongoing data collection, as the views of beginning teachers about their pre-service education are important for universities to consider when they review how they go about providing their students with this initial orientation and preparation for life within a teaching profession.
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Community capacity building: fostering economic and social resilience

Community capacity building: fostering economic and social resilience

24. One of the key methodological approaches used by the OECD is the cross-country study. This involves bringing together a team of international experts and/or academics to exchange views and experiences with the main stakeholders in the fields of analysis. The aim is to help identify the strengths and weaknesses of current approaches, to make recommendations for policy development and to provide learning model policy and programme examples to help inspire the development of locally-tailored approaches. It is anticipated that a core team of experts will be identified, who will participate in all of the reviews. Accompanying this core team will be ad hoc experts, chosen as specialists in the area under review. This section sets out a broad proposed framework for a review of the capacity to build community capacity in line with the specific needs of individual countries.
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Effects of organisational capacity building on community development: a case study of civil society in Nandi south district

Effects of organisational capacity building on community development: a case study of civil society in Nandi south district

Over the past two decades, there has been an explosion in the number of civil society organizations in Kenya. The rapid increase has been as result of development gaps left by the government, which needs to be filled; significantly as well there has been increased competition for the scarce donor funds among Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) which donors prefers currently to be utilized on intangible projects like capacity building, while on the other hand the community prefer physical projects like construction of school which answers their needs directly. The study sought to establish the effect of organizational capacity building on community development. The study was based on systems theory by Miller and Rice (1967). The study adopted the Ex Post facto design and incorporated research instruments such as questionnaires, interviews, observations and focus group discussions in data collection among the samples of 198 respondents selected through simple random and stratified sampling. The study established that; firstly, there are two forms of organisational capacity building secondly, training has a positive impact on community development and thirdly, community engages in monitoring and evaluation fourthly, CSO’s have attained their objectives to some extent. The study concluded that, CSOs offer Civic education, training, and engages in advocacy and that CSOs are dependent on donors and that is why they to have a weak financial base and are not self sustaining. The study recommended that CSOs sho diversify on their sources of funds and review their systems and structures.
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Building Community Capacity Resources for Community Learning & Development Practice A Guide Complied by the Scottish Community Development Centre for

Building Community Capacity Resources for Community Learning & Development Practice A Guide Complied by the Scottish Community Development Centre for

Report of research and case studies funded by the Big Lottery Fund to help provide evidence about the effects of participation, whether involvement in community organisations helps people to connect with wider society, and the processes at work in organisations that make it possible for them to engage their users, members or citizens effectively. Links participation to debates on social capital and democracy. Describes how case study organisations created ‘participative experiences’ by: working through and as networks; “giving users a voice while improving the acoustics of the institutions in which they speak”; the power of hope and shared expectations of communities’ capacity. Spells out the implications of each.
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Building Connections, Getting Involved: Measuring Social Capital Outcomes of Community Learning and Development

Building Connections, Getting Involved: Measuring Social Capital Outcomes of Community Learning and Development

advantage those who have high social capital and hence increases the gap between the educationally rich and poor. Annual learning surveys provide consistent evidence of this wide and persisting learning divide in the UK (see e.g. Aldridge and Tuckett, 2005), whereby those who have most, continue to access more. They appear to confirm Bourdieu’s more pessimistic view of the competitive operation of social capital, however, if it is neither fixed nor immutable, then it is important that we understand how learning affects social capital. This pattern, however, is not true of engaging in community-based learning where there is evidence that it is effective in engaging young people and adults who do not engage in other forms of learning (Tett, 2006). The literature review conducted for Communities Scotland (Tett et al, 2006) showed that engaging in CLD could generate greater social capital for both adults and young people through boosting friendship networks, realising the assets of the community and building connections outwith the community.
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Promoting community participation and capacity building in post Soviet transition: The Armenia social investment fund

Promoting community participation and capacity building in post Soviet transition: The Armenia social investment fund

The absence of grassroots orientation within the formal institutions o f the state reinforces the old Soviet style hierarchical relations at the local level. Authorities at the central, regional (< marz) and local level generally do not appreciate and encourage grassroots participation and initiative. Ordinary community members are not regarded as equal partners who can have their say in the issues o f local development. The prevailing perception is that only formal authorities should be responsible for managing local issues. Whilst the legal and regulatory framework by and large supports decentralisation (section 6.3 in Chapter Six), the existing informal practices and attitude of the governing institutions suppress people’s initiative. Most respondents expressed an opinion that if ordinary residents attempted to take an initiative to resolve a local problem, where co-operation o f authorities would be needed, “nobody would take them seriously". As a resident in Ashnak put it, “It is very hard for people to get things done: wherever you turn, you encounter reluctant attitude [of authorities] or lack of finance” (AK-5). Various accounts o f the respondents indicate that when people directly appealed to regional or central authorities, they, as a rule, were neglected and encountered bureaucratic resistance. In Arevadasht, a resident said that marzpetaran (the regional governor’s office) will not take informal leaders seriously, and the only person who can deal with them is the mayor, “In order to deal with marzpetaran, you will need a written note from the mayor; and you also need a seal. How can we go and get things done with them? They will not give us anything there” (AR-5). A resident in P Sevak said, “If we go to the marzpetaran, they will tell us - who are you? You don’t have a mayor? Who are we? They will never take us seriously”(PS-7).
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Understanding the Role of Sport for Development in Community Capacity Building in a Refugee Camp in Tanzania

Understanding the Role of Sport for Development in Community Capacity Building in a Refugee Camp in Tanzania

Important for this discussion, and a point I emphasize, is that health promotion initiatives can often place an additional burden on already disadvantaged communities and individuals (Hamburg, 1987; Labonte, 1989; Simpson et al., 2003). As a result, community participation can be difficult to sustain (Brownlea, 1987; Stone, 1992; Woelk, 1992). A key characteristic of community participation is that the benefits must override the costs associated with program participation (Goodman et al., 1998). To maintain community participation, which is essential to capacity in every other organizational domain, the altruistic, emotional, and symbolic benefits of being a volunteer coach (i.e., making the community a better place for children to live; self recognition; and acknowledgment from other community members) needed to outweigh the costs (i.e., time commitment; time away from other activities that could produce income). As Simpson et al. discuss, for individuals and communities overextended by the socioeconomic realities of poverty, the question arises as to whether the time, expertise, and other demands that accompany community ownership of a program or initiative are manageable or even possible. Moreover, Bopp and Bopp (2004) insist that unless poverty is addressed along with the health or social issues being targeted by a specific program, the community’s capacity to carry out that program will be negligible.
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Nonprofit-Driven Community Capacity-Building Efforts in Community Food Systems

Nonprofit-Driven Community Capacity-Building Efforts in Community Food Systems

This study does have limitations. Learning local residents’ opinions about the projects or programs of the NPOs in their neighborhoods could have provided an in-depth understanding of the role of NPOs in building community capacity, but this potentially time-consuming and expensive step was beyond the scope of this study. Engaging residents in such discussions should be the next logical step. This could be paired with a detailed spatial social network analysis of food-related projects and their participants. In addition, this study could have benefited from some discussions on cultural and natural capitals, which again could be included in follow-up research. Finally, this study could have been more effective and complete if more detailed and reliable data on financial capital were available. This may include systematic data on organizational budgets, surpluses, and expenses; job creation and retention; employee salaries and benefits; and dissolution or turnover rates. The economic development aspect of food- related research will be a key research agenda in the near future.
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Sport-For-Youth-Development (SFYD): A Capacity Building Model.

Sport-For-Youth-Development (SFYD): A Capacity Building Model.

Frisby, 2010; Misener & Doherty, 2009, 2012, 2013). Babiak (2003) described partnerships as “voluntary, close, long-term planned strategic action between two or more organizations with the objective of serving mutually beneficial purposes in a problem domain.” (p. 6). Partnerships can be utilized with funding agencies, government, private businesses, and other non-profits to build capacity in youth sport non-profit organizations (Casey, Payne, & Eime, 2009; Peng & Kellog, 2003). In addition, partnerships can contribute to positive program effects such as greater public exposure, increased social capital, and the development of a learning organization (Guo & Acar, 2005; Isett & Provan, 2005; Paarlberg & Varda, 2009). Despite their potential inter-organizational partnerships are not always utilized effectively in the youth sport context (Babiak & Thibault, 2009; Frisby et al., 2004; Hartmann & Kwauk, 2011; Misener & Doherty, 2013; Sharpe, 2006). Community sport clubs represent one of the largest sectors of non-profit organizations in many Western countries (Misener & Doherty, 2009), and provide most people with their first exposure to organized sport (Doherty et al., 2014), yet they often struggle to establish effective partnerships (Frisby et al., 2004). Even when partnerships do exist, research suggests that many are constrained by limited resources (Misener & Doherty, 2009), poor communication (Frisby et al., 2004), and power imbalances (Hayhurst & Frisby, 2010). Given that many of these organizations draw on limited resources to run their programs, this lack of collaboration may significantly impact their ability to deliver consistent services.
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Identifying and building the leadership capacity of community of practice facilitators

Identifying and building the leadership capacity of community of practice facilitators

Wenger (1998) suggests that working together in social contexts in- volves a dual process of meaning making. This meaning is developed for members through joint participation, activities, and discussion, and meaning is created through physical and physical and conceptual artefacts, such as ideas, shared stories, and resources. In the CoP narrative told here, members were involved in both processes: engaging and participating in joint activities and creating a repertoire of shared stories, experiences, documents (surveys, reports, a project website), and a comprehensive range of resources. The team planned for and engaged an iterative, re- flective, action learning approach, which provided structure for the two years of activities and outcomes at each of the seven project stages. The planned outcomes were achieved after a comprehensive literature review, survey and interviews, as depicted in Figure 2, as well as engagement with national and international members of the project stakeholder network.
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Community Development Corporations in Cincinnati: Capacity Building and the Neighborhood Approach to Developing Communities

Community Development Corporations in Cincinnati: Capacity Building and the Neighborhood Approach to Developing Communities

Programming: What are the CDCs doing? CDCs are primarily known for their work in housing, yet there is much more variety to what CDCs do. This section will reveal the assortment of operation these organizations undertake. Respondents were asked to select as many as applicable from a list of common CDC activities. Housing was broken down into three categories – production, rehabilitation, and management. Other common CDC operations include economic and com- mercial development, advocacy, and to a lesser extent, social services, workforce development, and job training. Respondents were also given the option to add additional activities in which they participate.
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Building community capacity to meet the needs of our aging society : interdisciplinary competency development for professionals

Building community capacity to meet the needs of our aging society : interdisciplinary competency development for professionals

interdisciplinary ways (e.g. Community Partnerships for Older Adults, n.d.). An extensive search of the scholarly literature found no comprehensive description of these professionals, that is not surprising given that research in the area of community level approaches is still in its infancy. Examples of such professionals that emerge from the experience of frontrunner communities and the related national initiatives include staff of councils on aging or area agencies on aging; city/county planning staff; public health planners and program directors; city/county management staff; and United Way planners and program directors. For the purposes of this research, targeted professionals are defined as those who act in staff (or similar consultative) roles to develop or implement community level approaches to aging and who are associated with the fields of aging, public health or community planning. The relevant academic disciplines include gerontology, public administration, urban/regional planning, public health, and social work. This section will review the literature related to defining and developing a set of interdisciplinary competencies relevant to these targeted professionals who assist community level approaches to aging. After broadly describing competency-based education as it relates to the targeted professionals, this section will review examples of competency development that suggest methods and context for this research.
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Social Studies and Human Capacity Building for Sustainable Development in Nigeria

Social Studies and Human Capacity Building for Sustainable Development in Nigeria

Williamson, Rajabifard and Feonery (2003) argued that human capacity building is seen and viewed differently by different people which breeds confusion as there is lack of consensus among scholars. Nonetheless, Yamoah (2014) opined that human capacity building is the same as acquiring education, training and human resources development. Nurfazreen, Mas’rof and Rahman (2013) slightly held similar opinion when they said that human capacity building is all about laying emphasis on aspects of human (individual) and community capacity to increase the standard of living. But Hampel (2009) held the view that human capacity building is a process that translates into increasing the capability in performance of a certain activity which can be skills, knowledge and so on.
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Co evolution of Forestry Policy Development and System Social Community

Co evolution of Forestry Policy Development and System Social Community

Referring to the results of a review of biodiversity, silviculture and participatory mapping were collected as evidence of the social and environmental benefits of the Krui system. The Minister of Forestry was asked to consider the Krui system as a special area and in January 1998, the minister established Krui as KDTI (Fores for special purpose area) of 29,000 ha. For the first time local people were allowed to collect the proceeds, both timber and non-timber forest products from state forest areas. They are also given full rights to manage forests with self-organizing community management structures. The ICRAF team draws on the experience of the Philippines with the ancestral domain certification system as the basis for the plan [30]. In the case of GFP STS management where a conservative nature conservation forest paradigm is inappropriate to use. Such inaccuracies have implications for failure to implement. It is important to consider what kind of rules are appropriate for designing forest management systems. The creation of rules affecting the wider community needs to be considered on what conditions the rules are made and how to keep the community in compliance with the rules.
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Capacity Building and Community Development in Nigeria

Capacity Building and Community Development in Nigeria

229 | P a g e heart of sustainable development, which includes the fight against poverty, it can be understood how Akindale (1999) explains that individuals, groups and entire communities are required to learn, adapt and adapt to collaborate in an organized effort to facilitate and achieve national sustainable development, Thereby minimizing poverty. Okorie (2003) highlights the scenario as an effective tool for managing people who work in an organization and gives them the opportunity to be more productive and get job-satisfaction, which also confirms the organization's genuine interest in its philosophy, culture and goals forever, which also includes human resources for sustainability of organization and economy.Capacity-building can be interpreted from a human capital perspective if people have the necessary knowledge and skills necessary for individual growth and for national growth and development. The capacity needed by a country for sustainable development depends mainly on the adequacy and relevance of the initiative. According to Banjoko (2002: 91), capacity building in the Nigerian government is necessary because the link between demand and supply is weak. In higher education institutes, there is a lack of real means that make it difficult to develop suitable workers. In this context, Banjoko trusts that there is need for support and change. He also noted that educational institutions were isolated and that communities were poor. For him, the development of teaching materials in schools is ineffective. Alternative capacity-building opportunities are not recognized adequately. In his view the three cases mentioned above make capacity building necessary, adding that Nigeria needs to use capacity-building strategies and other ways to strengthen people and change current practices. With regard to capacity, capacity- building is a means of achieving productivity and sustainable developmentAjayi (2006:32) opined that manpower is central to social existence as it is the central component of the citizenry of any country. To improve Nigeria‟s economicaladvantage, the researcher (Ajayi)recommends that special importance be given to maximising productivity and effectiveness via human capacity building, motivatingcommunity development activities as well as cooperation of all stakeholders. It is evident that today there is a desperate need to develop effective administration in industries and organizations of both private and public segments. This needs developed out of the understanding that the progress and development of Nigeria significantly depends on the existence of anwell-organized, devoted, inventive and creative workforce, Nwankwo (2014).
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Building sport for development practitioners’ capacity for undertaking monitoring and evaluation – reflections on a training programme building capacity in realist evaluation

Building sport for development practitioners’ capacity for undertaking monitoring and evaluation – reflections on a training programme building capacity in realist evaluation

At present, the quality and practice of Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) in Sport for Development (SfD) projects is under close scrutiny, mainly concerning the capacity that sport has to create social change. Critics have argued that a deeper understanding of ‘what works for whom and why’ is required when evaluating SfD projects. This paper explores practitioner involvement in M&E, drawing upon a ‘realist participatory M&E training framework’ developed to train student sport development practitioners to make sense of how and why their SfD projects worked. The training framework was evaluated utilizing a realist approach to understand what approaches to evaluation worked for those involved in the training framework. Specifically, 15 practitioners participated in the training framework encompassing 5 community focused SfD innovation projects delivered within the Coaching Innovation Programme at a south coast university in the United Kingdom. The realist evaluation incorporated Q-method factor analysis with realist interviews and reflective blogs. Findings on the value of realist evaluation for practitioners emerged. Practical and transformational evaluation characteristics unfolded and four groups of practitioners emerged depicting how the training framework worked. These groups were ‘new and emerging evaluators’, ‘polished problem solvers’, ‘passive passengers’, and ‘proficient yet sceptical practitioners’. These were underpinned by holistic narratives in line with Q-method demonstrating shared viewpoints about the training framework. In conclusion, participatory approaches of M&E can work with practitioners and should be embedded to enable application of realist evaluation.
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Capacity building and resilience for the community based dementia care workforce

Capacity building and resilience for the community based dementia care workforce

been identified by Horner and Boldy (2008) as a critical element of quality of life and significant for social connection, while also placing some burden on carers, family and organisations. A recent literature review on ageing in place found access to quality support services was the most commonly cited factor affecting the length of time older adult residents remained in their homes, and costly and intensive interventions were not necessarily needed in all cases (Locke, Lam, Henry, & Brow, 2011). Indeed, assistance with simple housekeeping and lifting of heavy objects were two of the most widely reported unmet service needs. Changes to the physical environment that incorporate accessibility features (such as lever door handles, ramps, wider doorways to accommodate wheelchairs, nonslip floor surfaces, and bathroom aids) were found to be necessary for successful ageing in place (Locke et al., 2011). Despite identifying some common unmet needs for older adults living at home, the review by Lock et al. (2011) did not focus on the specific service needs of people with dementia to age in place. These additional services are likely to relate to the aforementioned set of needs for people with dementia and their caregivers (highlighted in the previous section), and may include access to informational and educational resources about the disease and other health care treatments such as medication and symptom management.
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Capacity Building in Macedonia : Designing and Implementing an in-service Development Programme for Social Welfare Professionals

Capacity Building in Macedonia : Designing and Implementing an in-service Development Programme for Social Welfare Professionals

supervision for social workers is taught on university training courses in Macedonia; however, it is not well-developed in practice. The importance of supervision (or ‘one-to-one review’ as it was termed) was emphasised in the curriculum and training materials. The use of one-to-one supervision as a vehicle for monitoring and promoting learning was integrated into each module. This new approach to supervision was warmly welcomed by the staff at ISA and other senior personnel whom we consulted during the

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Age-friendly community capacity building in Newfoundland and Labrador

Age-friendly community capacity building in Newfoundland and Labrador

Building community capacity is a key component of Age-Friendly committee success, as indicated by the WHO (2007), but also by participants in this research. Communities tended to be less successful when work was conducted internally within committees, and quite successful by those who reached out to engage with other community organizations, businesses, schools, local media, the municipality, and the general population. This is consistent with the findings in Quebec by Garon, Paris, Beaulieu, Veil, and Laliberté (2014), who note the importance of collaboration between various stakeholders, and having a common goal, on program sustainability, and more specifically on attaining additional, follow-up funding, and with Keyes et al. (2014) who recognized the continual need for collaboration with a variety of community groups and stakeholders. Trust and reciprocity are important components of social capital (Putnam, 2000), and by encouraging committees to work with other established groups in their communities, they are laying the foundation for a reciprocal relationship between Age- Friendly initiatives and other groups. Those committees who were able to capitalize on existing bonding social capital by involving groups and organizations at various levels typically were more successful in their committee development and project
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