Top PDF Coupled Dynamics of a Nanomechanical Resonator and Superconducting Quantum Circuits

Coupled Dynamics of a Nanomechanical Resonator and Superconducting Quantum Circuits

Coupled Dynamics of a Nanomechanical Resonator and Superconducting Quantum Circuits

v Abstract The coupled dynamics of a nanomechanical resonator and superconducting quantum circuits are studied in three experiments, in the context of studying the quantum limit for forc[r]

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Nanofabrication for On-Chip Optical Levitation, Atom-Trapping, and Superconducting Quantum Circuits

Nanofabrication for On-Chip Optical Levitation, Atom-Trapping, and Superconducting Quantum Circuits

Researchers have spent decades refining and improving their methods for fabricating smaller, finer- tuned, higher-quality nanoscale optical elements with the goal of making more sensitive and accurate measurements of the world around them using optics. Quantum optics has been a well-established tool of choice in making these increasingly sensitive measurements which have repeatedly pushed the limits on the accuracy of measurement set forth by quantum mechanics. A recent develop- ment in quantum optics has been a creative integration of robust, high-quality, and well-established macroscopic experimental systems with highly-engineerable on-chip nanoscale oscillators fabricated in cleanrooms. However, merging large systems with nanoscale oscillators often require them to have extremely high aspect-ratios, which make them extremely delicate and difficult to fabricate with an “experimentally reasonable” repeatability, yield and high quality. In this work we give an overview of our research, which focused on microscopic oscillators which are coupled with macroscopic optical cavities towards the goal of cooling them to their motional ground state in room temperature envi- ronments. The quality factor of a mechanical resonator is an important figure of merit for various sensing applications and observing quantum behavior. We demonstrated a technique for pushing the quality factor of a micromechanical resonator beyond conventional material and fabrication limits by using an optical field to stiffen and trap a particular motional mode of a nanoscale oscillator. Optical forces increase the oscillation frequency by storing most of the mechanical energy in a nearly loss-less optical potential, thereby strongly diluting the effects of material dissipation. By placing a 130 nm thick SiO 2 pendulum in an optical standing wave, we achieve an increase in the pendulum
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Fermionic models with superconducting circuits

Fermionic models with superconducting circuits

The superconducting setup that we are considering for this quantum simulation is com- posed of N transmon qubits coupled to a single resonator. In order to perform highly nonlocal interactions between two distant qubits, every qubit with label inside the inter- val spanned by them should interact with the same resonator. Coupling several qubits to just one resonator can be a difficult task wherever the number of simulated sites is large enough. Therefore, we propose an optimized architecture for the simulation of Fermi- Hubbard model with up to next-nearest neighbours in D. As it is shown in Figure , we propose a setup with N superconducting circuits distributed in a square lattice []. Se- quentially coupling two rows by a single transmission line resonator, one can reduce the number of qubits coupled to a single resonator. Nevertheless, all the interactions needed for satisfying the Jordan-Wigner mapping can be simulated with this architecture. Fur- thermore, one can achieve a speedup of the protocol by performing interactions that in- volve different qubits in a parallel way, e.g. the interaction between qubits  and  and the one between qubits  and  can be performed simultaneously using resonators  and , respectively.
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Hybrid atom-photon quantum gate in a superconducting microwave resonator

Hybrid atom-photon quantum gate in a superconducting microwave resonator

Hybrid quantum computation exploits the unique strengths of disparate quantum technologies, enabling realization of a scalable processor capable of both fast gates and long coher- ence times that has yet to be achieved using a single physi- cal qubit. Superconducting qubits coupled via microwave res- onators have been identified as promising candidates for such an interface offering both fast (∼ns) gate times and a scalabil- ity through fabrication of chip-based superconducting circuits [2–4], which have already been used to implement quantum algorithms [5], many-body Hamiltonians [6] and synthesis of arbitrary quantum states of the resonator mode [7]. However, a limiting factor is the coherence time of the qubits, typically around 60 µs [8, 9]. This makes coupling the superconducting circuits to external qubits for quantum memory advantageous. To date a number of systems have been explored for this pur- pose, including solid state spin-ensembles [10], color centers in diamond [11], nano-mechical resonators [12] and atoms.
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Theory and Experiment of Slow Light Coupled Resonator Structures

Theory and Experiment of Slow Light Coupled Resonator Structures

resonator increases, the increase of losses is approximately linear. As we couple more resonators, the disorder loss increases and the yield of CROWs drops. At some N, the loss becomes too large that the CROWs are no longer useful. Therefore, we define the maximum number of resonators, N max , as the maximum N with disorder loss smaller than 5 dB. With N max , we can determine the maximum achievable group delay, which is proportional to N max B . Fig. 2.12(d) shows the maximum delay versus the bandwidth of the CROWs. For disorder in resonant frequency δω , N max increases with the bandwdidth, and the resulting maximum delay increases with the bandwidth. On the other hand, the effect of disorder in coupling coefficients is bandwidth-independent, so N max is constant and the maximum delay is inversely proportional to the bandwidth. The curves for the two kinds of disorder are shown respectively, and the green curve shows the maximum group delay in the presence of both disorders. The achievable delay is maximum when the two disorder effects are equally strong and is flat over a wide range of bandwidth. In conclusion, in the presence of disorder, the achievable delay of CROWs has an upper limit, no matter how we choose the bandwidth.
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Novel Star-Junction Coupled-Resonator Multiplexer Structures

Novel Star-Junction Coupled-Resonator Multiplexer Structures

A 4-channel multiplexer with a resonant junction is illustrated here. The specifications of the normalized passbands of the multiplexer channels are: channel 1: (−2.6 to −2.2), channel 2: (−1 to −0.6), channel 3: (0.6 to 1) and channel 4: (2.2 to 2.6). All the channels have 3rd order Chebyshev filtering function and a return loss of 20 dB. The topology of the multiplexer is depicted in Fig. 3 with two different arrangements of channels, where resonator 1 is the resonant junction. An unconstrained local optimization technique has been employed to synthesize the coupling matrix of the multiplexer for both arrangements of channels in Fig. 3(a) and Fig. 3(b).
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Quantum capacitance and charge sensing of a superconducting double dot

Quantum capacitance and charge sensing of a superconducting double dot

We study the energetics of a superconducting double dot, by measuring both the quantum capacitance of the device and the response of a nearby charge sensor. We observe different behaviour for odd and even charge states and describe this with a model based on the competition between the charging energy and the superconduct- ing gap. We also find that, at finite temperatures, thermodynamic considerations have a significant effect on the charge stability diagram.

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QUANTUM COMPUTER ELEMENTS BASED ON COUPLED QUANTUM WAVEGUIDES

QUANTUM COMPUTER ELEMENTS BASED ON COUPLED QUANTUM WAVEGUIDES

Sandwich structure of weakly coupled magnetic/nonmagnetic conducting layers can be used as a spin-ˇlter. Let the magnetic layers be narrow. The nonmagnetic layers can be considered as waveguides. The boundary conditions are determined by the number of free levels in magnetic layers with given spin orientation of the electron. If there are no free levels for the spin orientation, then one has the Dirichlet condition at the boundary. In other cases, we have another boundary conditions, for example, the Neumann one. Due to the difference in resonance position for different boundary conditions and the narrowness of the resonant peak there exist electron energies corresponding to the resonance for one spin orientation and the absence of the resonance for another one. Thus, the spin polarized beam of reected electrons appears, and the transmitted beam is partly polarized. The system of some coupling windows (which are placed at a distance to prevent an appearance of complex interference effects) gives us a strongly polarized beam. The same structure can be used for ˇnal measuring of resulting system state. Single-qubit operations can be accomplished as follows. We can use the applied electromagnetic ˇeld in some domains or ferromagnetic inclusions inserted in some parts of the semiconductor boundary.
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From estimation of quantum probabilities to simulation of quantum circuits

From estimation of quantum probabilities to simulation of quantum circuits

Investigating the classical simulability of quantum circuits provides a promising av- enue towards understanding the computational power of quantum systems. Whether a class of quantum circuits can be efficiently simulated with a probabilistic classical computer, or is provably hard to simulate, depends quite critically on the precise no- tion of “classical simulation” and in particular on the required accuracy. We argue that a notion of classical simulation, which we call epsilon -simulation (or -simulation for short), captures the essence of possessing “equivalent computational power” as the quantum system it simulates: It is statistically impossible to distinguish an agent with access to an -simulator from one possessing the simulated quantum system. We relate -simulation to various alternative notions of simulation predominantly focusing on a simulator we call a poly-box. A poly-box outputs 1/poly precision additive estimates of Born probabilities and marginals. This notion of simulation has gained prominence through a number of recent simulability results. Accepting some plausible compu- tational theoretic assumptions, we show that -simulation is strictly stronger than a poly-box by showing that IQP circuits and unconditioned magic-state injected Clifford circuits are both hard to -simulate and yet admit a poly-box. In contrast, we also show that these two notions are equivalent under an additional assumption on the sparsity of the output distribution (poly-sparsity).
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Metrology of Quantum Control and Measurement in Superconducting Qubits

Metrology of Quantum Control and Measurement in Superconducting Qubits

Nature readily gives us stable, discrete quantum systems - atoms. Atoms can be isolated by first ionizing them, then trapping them in an electromagnetic field within an ultra- high vacuum environment [40, 41, 42]. Historically, trapped ions were first used as highly stable clocks because the energy levels of the ions were highly stable and predictable [43, 44]. These properties also lend themselves to high fidelity single qubit manipulation. The qubit basis is formed using two of the ion’s energy levels, chosen based on a balance of stability and ease of manipulation and measurement. Single qubits can be controlled using microwaves [45, 46] or lasers [47]. The qubit state is measured by driving a tran- sition which causes the ion to fluoresce conditional on the qubit state [48]. Two qubit interactions are generally mediated by the Coulomb force between two ions, and high fidelity two qubit gates have been achieved by conditionally driving a vibrational mode between the two qubits [47].
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Active and passive coupled-resonator optical waveguides

Active and passive coupled-resonator optical waveguides

where χ(r) is the susceptibility and p(r, t) is the small amplitude fluctuation of P(r, t) which we will use later in our analysis of noise. Generally speaking, in active struc- tures, the susceptibility is a function of time, since the carrier or population densities are modified by the optical field. We shall simplify the analysis to a quasi-static picture where the optical signal varies on a much longer time scale than the carrier dynamics, so the gain and loss can be taken as constants. Furthermore, in the regime of small values of gain, we can neglect nonlinearities due to saturation so χ(r) is linear and can be expressed as χ(r) = ²(r) + iσ(r). ²(r) is the dielectric profile of the structure and σ(r) accounts for the gain or loss depending on its sign (positive for gain and negative for loss). ²(r) and σ(r) are dimensionless. Substituting the polarization density into Maxwell’s equations, we arrive at
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On-chip hybrid superconducting-semiconducting quantum circuit

On-chip hybrid superconducting-semiconducting quantum circuit

HE hybrid superconductor-semiconductor-superconductor (S-Sm-S) structures have been proposed to be the building blocks of the next generation of quantum computers, after the purported detection of exotic Majorana particles with zero electrical charges at the interface of S-Sm junctions [1-3]. However, there still is a fundamental technological problem in the (i) fabrication of highly transparent interfaces between superconductors and semiconductors and (ii) scaling the number of junctions up in a single chip to realize a quantum device applicable for quantum technology [4-7]. In this regard, we have recently demonstrated hybrid Josephson junctions with highly transparent interfaces between the superconducting Niobium (Nb) and semiconducting In 0.75 Ga 0.25 As two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) contacts.
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Some implications of superconducting quantum interference to the application of master equations in engineering quantum technologies

Some implications of superconducting quantum interference to the application of master equations in engineering quantum technologies

archical, quantitative simulations will be required which are capable of accurately and reliably predicting the be- haviour of the system-under-development at different lev- els of abstraction. The ultimate ambition of this ap- proach being to achieve a level of realism that would en- able the sort of zero-prototyping that occurs in the design of Very Large Scale Integrated (VLSI) microelectronics and which is also now becoming an aim of the automo- tive and other industries. Given the intractability by classical means of modelling complex quantum systems, it is an open question as to how well and how far this design paradigm can be translated to the engineering of quantum technologies. Consequently, there is a need to investigate the extent to which it is possible to develop a hierarchy of system models that is able to provide, from a design perspective, usefully accurate modelling, simu- lation and figures of merit at the component, device and system level.
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Quantum  circuits  for  the  CSIDH:  optimizing  quantum  evaluation  of  isogenies

Quantum circuits for the CSIDH: optimizing quantum evaluation of isogenies

The product of computer size and time is typically called “area-time product” or “AT ” in the literature on non-quantum computation; “volume” in the liter- ature on quantum computation; and “price-performance ratio” in the literature on economics. The cost of quantum error correction is not the only argument for viewing this product as the true cost of computation: there is a more fundamen- tal argument stating that the total cost assigned to two separate computations should not depend on whether the computations are carried out in serial (using hardware for twice as much time) or in parallel (using twice as much hardware). From this perspective, it is much better to use parallel algorithms for integer addition that finish in time Θ(log n). This still means Θ(n log n) error-correction steps, so the cost is larger by a factor Θ(log n) than the number of bit operations. At a higher level, the CSIDH computation involves various layers for which highly parallel algorithms are not known. For example, modular exponentiation is notoriously difficult to parallelize. A conventional computation of x mod n, x 2 mod n, x 4 mod n, x 8 mod n, etc. can store each intermediate result on top of the previous result, but Bennett’s conversion produces a reversible computation that uses much more storage, and the resulting quantum computation requires continual error correction for all of the stored qubits. Shor’s algorithm avoids this issue because it computes a superposition of powers of a constant x; this is not helpful in the CSIDH context.
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Melnikov theory for weakly coupled nonlinear RLC circuits

Melnikov theory for weakly coupled nonlinear RLC circuits

We apply dynamical system methods and Melnikov theory to study small amplitude perturbation of some coupled implicit differential equations. In particular we show the persistence of such orbits connecting singularities in finite time provided a Melnikov like condition holds. Application is given to coupled nonlinear RLC system. MSC: Primary 34A09; secondary 34C23; 37G99

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Quantum Homomorphic Encryption for Polynomial-Size Circuits

Quantum Homomorphic Encryption for Polynomial-Size Circuits

Yu, Pérez-Delgado and Fitzsimons [58] showed that perfectly information-theoretically secure QFHE is not possible for arbitrary unitary transformations, unless the size of the encryption grows exponentially in the input size. Thus, any scheme that attempts to achieve information-theoretically secure QFHE has to leak some proportion of the input to the server [5, 48] or can only be used to evaluate a subset of all unitary transformations on the input [48, 40, 54]. Information-theoretically secure QFHE is not known to be achievable for the subset of our interest, that of all unitary transformations for which efficient quantum circuits exist. Like the multiplication operation is hard in the classical case, the hurdle in the quantum case seems to be the evaluation of non-Clifford gates. A recent result by Ouyang, Tan and Fitzsimons provides information-theoretic security for circuits with at most a constant number of non-Clifford operations [44]. Broadbent and Jeffery [16] proposed two schemes that achieve homomorphic encryption for nontrivial sets of quantum circuits. Instead of trying to achieve information-theoretic security, they built their schemes based on a classical FHE scheme and hence any computational assumptions on the classical scheme are also required for the quantum schemes. Computational assumptions allow bypassing the impossibility result from [58] and work toward a (quantum) fully homomorphic encryption scheme.
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Combinatorics of Boolean automata circuits dynamics

Combinatorics of Boolean automata circuits dynamics

or different formalisms were carried out to determine theoretical properties of such networks [4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16]. One of the main motivations of many of them was to better understand those emergent dynamical behaviours that networks display and that cannot be explained or predicted by a simple analysis of the local interactions existing between the components of the net- works. In particular, later works by [17] and [18] yielded conjectures and gave rise to problematics that are still relevant in the field of regulation networks be- yond the particular definition of the models one may choose to use. For instance, Thomas highlighted the importance of specific patterns, namely circuits, on the dynamics of discrete regulation networks and Kauffman gave an approximation of the number of different possible asymptotic behaviours of Boolean networks. Thus, from the point of view of theoretical biology but also from that of discrete mathematics and theoretical computer science, it is relevant to ad- dress the question of the number of attractors in the dynamics of a network. Close to the 16th Hilbert problem concerning the number of limit cycles of dy- namical systems [19], this question has already been considered in some works [20,21,22,15,16]. Driven by a similar will to understand the dynamical proper- ties of (regulation) networks modeled by Boolean automata networks, we have decided to first focus our attention on a simple instance of Boolean automata networks, that is, Boolean automata circuits (which also happen to be a sim- ple instance of threshold Boolean automata networks [1]). The reason for this choice is that circuits are known to play an important part in the dynamics of a network that contains them. One way to see this is to note that a network whose underlying interaction graph has no circuits can only eventually end up in a configuration that will never change over time. A network with retroactive loops, on the contrary, will exhibit more diverse dynamical behaviour patterns. [17] noted the importance of underlying circuits in networks and formulated con- jectures concerning the role of positive (i.e., with an even number of inhibitions) and negative (i.e., with an odd number of inhibitions) circuits in the dynamics of regulation networks. Besides the fact that they are known to be decisive pat- terns for the dynamics of arbitrary biological networks, circuits are also relevant because they may be regarded specifically as internal layers of feedforward net- works 5 . Identifying the dynamics of circuits is thus a first step in the process of
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Quality factor of a transmission line coupled coplanar waveguide resonator

Quality factor of a transmission line coupled coplanar waveguide resonator

Low loss rates provided by superconducting coplanar waveguides (CPW) and CPW res- onators are relevant for microwave applications which require quantum-scale noise levels and high sensitivity, such as mutual kinetic inductance detectors [1], parametric amplifiers [2], and qubit devices based on Josephson junctions [3], electron spins in quantum dots [4], and NV-centers [5]. Transmission line (TL) coupling allows for implementing rela- tively weak resonator-feedline coupling strengths without significant off-resonant pertur- bations to the propagating modes in the feedline CPW. Owing to this property and ben- efiting from their simplicity, notch-port couplers are extensively used in frequency mul- tiplexing schemes [6], where a large number of CPW resonators of different frequencies are coupled to a single feedline. The geometric design of such resonators determines the resonant frequencies of their modes, loss rates and coupling coefficients of these modes to other elements of the circuit. 3D electromagnetic simulation software provides excellent means for complete characterization of such structures by finite element analysis. How- ever, in the case of simple structures, analytical formulas can be devised that are invaluable for engineering of large multi-pixel resonator arrays.
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Aperture and Mutual Coupled Cylindrical Dielectric Resonator Antenna Array

Aperture and Mutual Coupled Cylindrical Dielectric Resonator Antenna Array

Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang 14300, Malaysia Abstract—A 1 × 3 element linear array using cylindrical dielectric resonator antennas (CDRAs) is designed and presented for 802.11a WLAN system applications. The top and bottom elements of CDRA array are excited through the rectangular coupling slots etched on the ground plane, while the slots themselves are excited through the microstrip transmission line. The third element (i.e., central CDRA) is excited through the mutual coupling of two radiating elements by its sides. This mechanism enhances the bandwidth (96.1%) and gain (14.3%) as compared to aperture coupled technique. It is also observed that the side lobe levels are reduced over the designed frequency band. Using CST microwave studio, directivity of 10.5 dBi has been achieved for operating frequency of 5.6 GHz. Designed antenna array is fabricated and tested. Simulated and measured results are in good agreement. The equivalent lumped element circuit is also designed and presented using Advanced design system (ADS) for this proposed array.
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Meta genetic programming for static quantum circuits

Meta genetic programming for static quantum circuits

Quantum programs are difficult for humans to develop due to their complex semantics that are rooted in quantum physics. It is there- fore preferable to write specifications and then use techniques such as genetic programming (GP) to generate quantum programs in- stead. We present a new genetic programming system for quantum circuits which can evolve solutions to the full-adder and quantum Fourier transform problems in fewer generations than previous work, despite using a general set of gates. This means that it is no longer required to have any previous knowledge of the solution and choose a specialised gate set based on it.
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