Top PDF Developing character skills in schools

Developing character skills in schools

Developing character skills in schools

Character education can be defined in various ways, and can be seen to overlap with concepts in the literature such as ‘non-cognitive skills’ or ‘social and emotional skills’. For the purpose of this survey, character education was defined as any activities that aim to develop desirable character traits in children and young people. Ultimately, character education seeks to prepare children and young people for well-rounded and successful adult lives; supporting improved academic attainment, employability and citizenship. Increasing emphasis has been placed on character education in recent years, including significant investment by the Department of Education in projects aimed at developing desirable character traits in children and young people through the Character Innovation Fund. This survey was commissioned in order to understand what schools in England currently do to try and develop desirable character traits among their pupils, and to explore their experiences of putting this provision into place. The Department intend for this evidence to provide a basis for future work, including research into effective practice and gaps in provision.
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Developing character skills in schools

Developing character skills in schools

The biggest barriers for schools seeking to provide character education centred around competing demands on staff time and capacity. The qualitative research found that the school-wide nature of character education made staff capacity particularly important for successful delivery. Staff time was not only needed to deliver specific provision, but also to ensure that key aims and messages were embedded across the curriculum, and understood and committed to by all staff. Competing time pressures were reported to largely come from the introduction of new curriculum specifications and pressures such as performance-related pay and inspection requirements that encouraged schools to focus on academic subjects and results. Allocating staff time to deliver character
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Developing higher-order reading skills in mainstream primary schools : a metacognitive approach in educational psychology in Scotland a study protocol

Developing higher-order reading skills in mainstream primary schools : a metacognitive approach in educational psychology in Scotland a study protocol

A total sample of around circa 100 children will be recruited to allow for attrition. This is based on the minimal score difference which could be detected by the least reliable of the standardised instruments used as primary outcome measures and equates to a medium effect size, Cohen’s d of 0.736, with a one-tailed test at 5% level of significance and power of 0.8. The pilot study will provide information regarding how tenable this size of intervention effect will be. The method of recruitment is outlined above. Given the class numbers within the authority, a sample of 100 children equates to approximately 4-6 classes of Primary 5 children who are requested to take part (depending upon class sizes to ensure adequate power). This allows for approximately 2-3 classes (of different schools) of children in the intervention study and 2-3 (classes/schools) for the control. However the final number of participants, schools and also the duration of the programme will be informed by the results of Study 1.
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DEVELOPING SPEAKING SKILLS IN PRIMARY CLASSES

DEVELOPING SPEAKING SKILLS IN PRIMARY CLASSES

During the years of independence, more than 51.7 thousand foreign language teachers were trained, multimedia textbooks on English, German and French for 5-9 classes of secondary schools, electronic resources for Learning English in primary schools were prepared, and more than 5 thousand audio classes were equipped in secondary schools, vocational colleges and academic lyceums.

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Developing Appropriate Skills for the Future: Teaching the Right Technology Skills

Developing Appropriate Skills for the Future: Teaching the Right Technology Skills

, younger people are inherently more adept in the use of technology, merely because they have grown up with it. This fallacy ignores the fact that the ICT skill set that will be developed in this informal manner is likely to be incomplete, on account of the younger user’s predominant use of only certain applications. Younger people will be highly adept in certain functions, such as uploading content, or multimedia consumption, but unlikely to acquire proficiency in less intuitive applications, such as spreadsheets, word processing, or presentation software. This incomplete, patchwork acquisition of skills reinforces the argument for the delivery of well-rounded, broad-based skills development measures in schools. If not, school-leavers without them will be likely to be ineligible for the majority of employment opportunities available.
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Chapter 1. The primary responsibility for character and citizenship development lies with. Character and Citizenship Education in Alberta Schools

Chapter 1. The primary responsibility for character and citizenship development lies with. Character and Citizenship Education in Alberta Schools

As with character education, our conceptions of what citizenship education is are changing as our understandings of citizenship are expanding. In a traditional conception of citizenship education, the purpose was to produce loyal and dutiful citizens. As understandings of citizenship expand to address issues such as human rights, language, nationalism, globalization, equality, multiculturalism and pluralism, citizenship education is becoming more centred on the concept of inclusion and respect for diversity. More recently, citizenship education began explicitly recognizing the role of developing skills and processes. Strategies such as inquiry, literature studies and case studies develop the cognitive and critical-thinking skills associated with active and participatory citizenship. 3
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Developing the Facebook-Problem Based Learning Model: A Way of Improving the Geographical Solving-Problem Skills at Senior High Schools

Developing the Facebook-Problem Based Learning Model: A Way of Improving the Geographical Solving-Problem Skills at Senior High Schools

ABSTRACT: The primary purpose of this study was to develop a model of learning based on Facebook- assisted learning to improve the geographic problem-solving abilities of high school students. Research and Development was the type of research entailed. Instructional System Design entailed was Plump consisting of (1) preliminary research (2) Prototype Phase (Prototyping phase); 3) Assessment stage. The product design stage investigates the validity and practicality with formative evaluations which include self-evaluation and one-to-one. The assessment stage uses summative evaluation which aims to assess the validity of the product in aspects of the organization, format, material and language. Practicality assesses the level of ease, the efficiency of time and benefits. As for effectiveness, it assesses student learning test results using the t-test. Exam questions are made in the form of essays and are assessed using an assessment rubric. Data is collected through discussions, observations, interviews, questionnaires and tests. The collected data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The results showed that for the validity of the Model book and its support system (teacher's books and student books) met the valid criteria of> 3.20 while the ICC value of the model book was 0.987, the ICC of student books was 0.943 and ICC of the teacher's book 0.965. These figures indicate that the model and the supporting system according to the expert is appropriate. The practicality results obtained are very practical that is easy to use, understood, very helpful in the learning process, the use of adequate time, and fun for students to learn. Effectiveness test results enable students to solve Geography problems in High Schools. In conclusion, the Valid, practical and effective Facebook- assisted problem-based learning model can improve the geography problem-solving ability of high school students.
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Business Schools: Generators of Skills for Entrepreneurs

Business Schools: Generators of Skills for Entrepreneurs

As a significant variable and highly relevant to our study is the relationship between the sector in which students have developed or are currently developing work experience and the economic sector in which they would be willing to start a new business. This means, how precise knowledge of any sector generates less uncertainty at the moment of undertaking new businesses. This hypothesis is confirmed by the results where the majority of respondents who spent more than three years working in any sector would undertake a new business within this sector, even if they are currently working: 85.1% of women and 85.6% of men. On the other hand, the percentages are lower among the unemployed, since men would risk by 60% when they have more than 3 years’ experience but 30% would try a new firm, just with 1
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A Case Study Of Developing Students’ Problem-Solving Skills Through Addressing Real-World Problems Related To Fractions In Primary Schools

A Case Study Of Developing Students’ Problem-Solving Skills Through Addressing Real-World Problems Related To Fractions In Primary Schools

was noted that the excellent performance of students in the experimental class was also thanks to the support, guidance and facilitation of teachers. Similarly, the authors Simamora, Sidabutarb and Surya [18] used problem-based learning to promote students’ learning activity and problem-solving skills in junior schools. Their sample consisted of 30 students in Indonesia, and they took tests and were observed in the classroom. Their research followed a two-cycle action research model. The results noted that in the second cycle, the percentage of students' active participation and problem-solving skills increased compared to cycle 1. These numbers demonstrated that after being taught in this approach, there had been an increase in the active participation of students in the classroom as well as the ability to solve mathematical problems. The authors, Osman et al. [13], meanwhile, chose an alternative approach of using visual techniques through the bar model. An empirical study was carried out on 32 third year studies, and it was quantitative research. Research findings showed that there had been a significant difference in students’ achievement in problem- solving skills in mathematics. Besides, results from the interview were also reported that understanding the problem and the motivation for learning also contributed to their excellent performance. The study was also expected to assist teachers in promoting students' ability to solve mathematical problems. A study on the relationship between problem-posing and problem-solving skill was conducted on 72 senior students by Kar et al. [9]. Participants performed tests on the compilation and solving of problems on series and sequences topics. After the data was analysed, there was a close relationship for success between posing and solving the problems. Alternatively, there was a coherence between the number of problems compiled and the number of successes in solving the problem. These strategies were similarly
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Role Of School On Forming Character Of Z-Generation Through Entrepreneurial Skills

Role Of School On Forming Character Of Z-Generation Through Entrepreneurial Skills

of entrepreneurship can be learned and mastered in a systematic and planned (Sarina et al, 2019). Entrepreneurship should be applied for all students and this competence should be owned also by headmaster (Andriani et al, 2018) (Renata et al, 2018). The elements of entrepreneurship in Islam are active and have a high work ethic, productive and innovative (Jalil, 2013). The role of schools in performing entrepreneur is to help learners acquire knowledge and skills, forming the character's personality, and interact with the environment (Hidayati and Wahyuni, 2017). Entrepreneurs can flourish interest and talent they have, but creativity in trying it will help smooth business. There are some character of an entrepreneur should be understood in running a business are 1) the self-discipline that is always sticking to commitments or abide the rules made by himself; 2) the details of that creative efforts are always to learn to discipline ourselves to deal with
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Character Animation 2D Skills for Better 3D pdf

Character Animation 2D Skills for Better 3D pdf

Developing a sense of the dramatic will help with your ability to realize what you want your character to express. In the same way that all movement in animation must be exaggerated to make it more convincing, the same is true of animation acting. I’ve found that animation acting has more in common with theatrical acting than live action film acting. Theatrical act- ing has to be big and demonstrative for the audience to see and understand what’s going on. The exaggeration required for this is similar to exaggerated cartoon movement. Whereas film acting requires a certain amount of restraint, the camera can cut right into somebody’s face and a whole range of emotions can be put over with the movement of an eyebrow. This is something that animation finds very difficult to do. The closer you cut into the face of your character, the more obvious it is that your character is artificial.
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The ‘Developing thinking skills and assessment for learning’ programme

The ‘Developing thinking skills and assessment for learning’ programme

56 Many schools have provided training on the principles of the programme to the teachers not initially involved in the programme and to newly appointed teachers. This is done through staff meetings, in-service training, classroom observations and by setting up professional learning communities. Many more teachers are now using the principles and tools in their day-to-day teaching than were initially involved in the pilot and the extension programmes. However, only a few schools have trained classroom assistants and only just over a half of schools have made parents aware of the programme and how they might support their child. As a result, there is a lack of consistency in the support pupils experience as those staff who are not familiar with the new strategies and tools carry on using other methods to teach and support pupils.
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SIGNIFICANCE OF COMMUNICATION SKILLS FOR DEVELOPING TEACHER

SIGNIFICANCE OF COMMUNICATION SKILLS FOR DEVELOPING TEACHER

the isolation of a classroom without the presence of other adults, good teaching involves consultation with colleagues. Schools that see themselves as professional learning communities encourage teachers to plan lessons together and learn from one another. They take a team approach when problem-solving, especially for difficult students. This all requires excellent communication. Teachers stay abreast of new developments in education by reading journals, listening to new ideas from their administrators and school board consultants, and sharing and discussing these ideas with colleagues.
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Developing student 21st Century skills in selected exemplary inclusive STEM high schools

Developing student 21st Century skills in selected exemplary inclusive STEM high schools

Students need time to grapple with and learn new skills (Lynch et al., 2017; NGSS Lead States, 2013). While we were able to see evidence of higher rubric scores for 21 st Century skills for 12th grade students in the lesson plans, due to the convenience sampling of lesson plans and student work samples, we were not able to look at how students’ 21 st Century skills were built over time. There is a desire to better understand how ISHSs successfully develop these skills. This includes how schools incorporate and build the 21 st Century skills (a) within multiple lessons in one course, (b) across multiple classes over the course of a school year, and (c) throughout the students’ entire high school sequence. Future research may look at a longitudinal study that follows one student’s work over an entire school year to see how the 21CLD scores change. In addition, future studies may also look at how the short-term projects build the skills needed for the students to incorporate higher levels of 21 st Century skills in long-term projects.
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Developing One's Character: An Aristotelian Defense of Sportsmanship

Developing One's Character: An Aristotelian Defense of Sportsmanship

Indeed, it was a lesson that soon swept through both campuses. “For the players,” Oklobzija continued, “the minutes and hours that followed—from the time Paino was struck to the time they learned his injuries weren’t believed to be serious—were traumatic but precious. Players cried. Parents cried. Players prayed. Parents prayed. And college baseball players grew as people” (Oklobzija, 2008:A3). The story also received national attention. It was featured on ESPN, which quoted Fisher’s pitcher Justin Lutes, a graduating senior whose pitch had been the one Pecora connected with, and—like seven other of his fellow seniors—whose college career thus came to an end: “It isn’t exactly the dream I had about how I wanted to go out. But there was a lesson that we all learned. People may think that sports are their life. But when you see somebody’s life flash before you, you realize there are bigger things in the world than a baseball game” (Wayne Drehs, “Inches from Tragedy, Oswego Overcomes.” ESPN.go.com. May 16, 2008:3. Available: http://sports.espn.go.com/ncaa/news/story?id=3398247). The NCAA’s Committee on Sportsmanship and Ethical Conduct awarded the Fisher team its national 2008 NCAA Sportsmanship Male Award. The Cardinals were also named as the Empire 8 Conference’s Male Sportsmanship Award winner. Dr. Delaney and I would like to think that the Fisher and Oswego teams arranged this for our benefit, to show that the schools of the two authors believe in the reality of sportsmanship.
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Designing a Model for Developing Students' Needs Skills of High Schools for Using Virtual Learning

Designing a Model for Developing Students' Needs Skills of High Schools for Using Virtual Learning

Abstract – The main purpose of the present research is designing a model for developing students' Needs skills of high schools for using Virtual Learning. The Methodology of research is correlation. The general hypothesis, there are relationship between the Five skill needed for virtual student (availability, openness, communication, cooperation, flexibility) and students' efficiency learning in the virtual schools. The population of the study includes the whole of the virtual high Schools ' teachers of Iran (2011-2012). The statistical samples were randomly selected. Two questionnaires were used in this research. Questionnaire prepared by researcher based on the findings of Rena M Palloff and Keith Pratt and questionnaire prepared by researcher about using IT in the Learning. The reliability of two questionnaires were estimated 0/84 and 0/92. The total results show that there are positive relationships between students' efficiency learning in the virtual schools with students' motivation of learning, availability, openness, communication, cooperation , flexibility. Also there are there are positive relationship between students' motivation of learning with availability, openness, communication, cooperation, flexibility. The CFA shows that the measurement model fit the data very well with a goodness of fit index (AGFI) of 0/96 and adjusted goodness of fit index (GFI) of 0/95 and a chi-square (203.21) (p<0/001).It concluded that the adjusted model developing students' needs skills for using IT in the Learning.
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Designing an instructional method for developing self regulation skills at primary schools

Designing an instructional method for developing self regulation skills at primary schools

This last research question is about to what extent the motivation towards self-regulation and independent learning is being influenced by the instructional method. The degree of motivation is measured by the questionnaire of Vandevelde, Van Keer and Rosseel (2013), see Appendix J. Note that the CP-SRLI’ questionnaire of Vandevelde, Van Keer, & Rosseel (2013) is used to measure both self-regulation (SQ 2.2) and motivation (SQ 2.3). From the questionnaire, only nine subtopics motivational strategies, self-evaluation (product-evaluation), self-evaluation (process-evaluation), external regulation, introjected regulation, identified regulation, internal regulation, self-efficacy regulation, self-efficacy motivation) are used investigate students’ motivation towards applying self- regulation skills. An example of a question of the subtopic motivational strategies is: I say to myself: 'When I'm done with my schoolwork, I'm going to do something nice'.
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Character Education in Schools

Character Education in Schools

Furthermore, teaching should allow students to make sense of the physical, social, and the aesthetic world. Teaching is a moral enterprise that encompasses students in the impersonal and the personal world. The bridge between their impersonal and personal is made by the interpersonal interactions of the teacher and the learner. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of character education programs there must first be clearer standards of what is expected of teachers. This requires reasonable goals and specific targets and precise statements about what teachers should be able to achieve. There must also be some type of professional development that lines up with the standards and expectations of character education programs. We need must identify the problems caused by a lack of character education, identify how to achieve it, empower teachers, schools, parents, administrators, and legislators. We must also measure the quality of the results of character education programs produce; develop a partnership between society, schools, and the community. Finally, there has to be continuous review of the goals and targets, and the method in which they are attained (Pring, 2001).
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Developing a Code of Behaviour: Guidelines for Schools

Developing a Code of Behaviour: Guidelines for Schools

Virtually every school now has a code of behaviour, as required by law. The NEWB Guidelines will be an important support for schools as they work continuously with students and their families to ensure that the code of behaviour can maintain the best possible educational environment in the school. The Guidelines have been prepared with the help of an Expert Group established by the Board, and wide-ranging inputs from management bodies, teacher unions, parent organisations, students, the Department of Education & Science and its agencies and services, non-governmental organisations, State agencies and many other contributors. This inclusive approach will help to maximise their benefit and value to schools.
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DEVELOPING PROPHETICAL STORIES AS A CHARACTER-BASED ENGLISH LEARNING SOURCE

DEVELOPING PROPHETICAL STORIES AS A CHARACTER-BASED ENGLISH LEARNING SOURCE

God stories can be used as the source in teaching in order that students can get both knowledge as well as good values as reflected through the characters of the story. This goal can also be implemented in teaching English by taking the Prophet stories. There are two goals can be achieved. First it can keep the existence of the religious figures and inherit them to the young generation. Besides that, the students can explore the great value expressed through the character of those stories as the moral message. Hopefully the students can learn from those stories how to have such good characters that are useful for life.
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