Top PDF Development of a structural model for quality cultural heritage tourism

Development of a structural model for quality cultural heritage tourism

Development of a structural model for quality cultural heritage tourism

60 the Western world and China. Those attractions represent an outstanding example of an architectural ensemble that illustrates the development of the encounter between the Western and Chinese civilisations over some four and half centuries, represented in the historical route, with a series of urban spaces and architectural ensembles, that links the ancient Chinese port with the Portuguese city. It is remarkable in setting off a succession of connections, has enriched both civilisations across a huge range of human endeavour, and is a critical influence in both tangible and intangible cultures of Macao. The strategic location of Macao on the Chinese territory, and the special relationship established between the Chinese and Portuguese authorities favoured an important interchange of human values in the various fields of culture, sciences, technology, art and architecture over several centuries. Combined with World Heritage Sites in Macao, visitors are able to experience different cultural heritage attractions including museums, historic sites (archaeological and non-archaeological sites), religious sites (temples and churches), living culture (gastronomy, handcrafts, language, art and music) and festivals and special events. After the launch of Macao‘s bid in 2002, the SAR government expended much effort both locally and abroad to raise cultural heritage awareness in relation to Macao‘s inscription. An extensive range of related promotional and educational activities targeted at different local communities aimed to communicate the value of Macao‘s monuments and to enhance citizens‘ interest in cultural heritage conservation. On the other hand, formal contact with regional and international communities ranged from organising conferences and seminars and arranging tours and exhibitions to facilitating academic research and publications. The longer-term educational initiatives include campaigns and competitions as well as curriculum additions attempting to cultivate appreciation among younger generations (MWHE3, 2005).
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Cultural Heritage Tourism in Malaysia: Issues and Challenges

Cultural Heritage Tourism in Malaysia: Issues and Challenges

Preserving the world's cultural heritage for the enrichment and education of present and future generations is crucial. A great deal of tourism relies on places with natural, indigenous and historic significance which tourism products are based. In order to respect the cultural significance of the destination, people involve in tourism industry need to be sensitive to cultural groups who have a special interest in them and they need to directly involve in the planning and promotion of the destination. Cultural Heritage resources will play a significant role in sustainable cultural, social, economic development of communities, so the physical fabric, that has influenced their creation, has also to be maintained. Therefore, the careful planning of cultural-heritage tourism leads to sustainable regional development. It is crucial to find a proper way to settle the issues and challenges arise during managing and promotion of cultural heritage tourism, and once is taken into action it will lead to the heritage tourism development model that will lead to the bright prospects of the overall tourism business in the region.
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Critical success factor for Community Benefiting through Tourism (CBtT) in cultural heritage tourism

Critical success factor for Community Benefiting through Tourism (CBtT) in cultural heritage tourism

Community-Based Tourism (CBT) is a tool to improve the quality of life of the rural community by creating direct employment opportunities as well as increasing income levels and consequently reducing the level of poverty in the rural areas. After a few decades, variants of CBT are formed to advocate sustainability in rural tourism industry such as Community Benefiting through Tourism (CBtT). By understanding CBtT concept will lead to a different perspective of Community- Based Tourism. The purpose of this study is to examine the implementation of CBtT on selected projects in Indonesia to initiate into the critical success factor of CBtT, especially in cultural heritage tourism. The case study focused on Saung Angklung Udjo, a successful CBT project which preserving Sundanese culture in Bandung, Indonesia. Saung Angklung Udjo is an art centre which has been proven to give the contribution to society. By applying qualitative research methodology with interview and observation method, this research explains how community gain benefits from tourism. The results show that there is a relationship between social, economic, and environmental dimensions in development of Community Benefiting through Tourism (CBtT). Besides, eight factors have been identified as success factors of CBtT in Saung Angklung Udjo, and one factor as new finding factor. Meanwhile, five factors were addressed as significant success factors for creating CBtT. These findings suggested recommendation to all tourism stakeholders to strategies community-oriented tourism project which gives benefit to the community.
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Cultural Heritage Tourism in South Africa: Perceived a Panacea for Rural Development?

Cultural Heritage Tourism in South Africa: Perceived a Panacea for Rural Development?

Saarinen and Rogerson (2015) posit that cultural tourism is perceived as one of the major development opportunities for Africa. Boswell and O’Kane (2011) communicated the significance of heritage in constructing African states’ identity and as a source of knowledge in Africa and highlighted the complexities of heritage management on the continent. Ivanovic and Saayman (2013a) claimed that cultural tourism is the most popular type of tourism in the world based on the universality of cultural motivation and consumption. They (Ivanovic and Saayman) further suggested that the African destination’s unique cultural tourism products must be packaged and promoted. Loulanski and Loulanski (2011) explored the relationship between tourism and cultural heritage. Their results revealed a representative set of synthesis factors aimed at achieving sustainability. These include among others, sustainability-centered tourism management and practice, local involvement, integrated planning and management, site management, integrated governance and stakeholder participation or destination management. Gupta and Dada (2014) communicated cultural tourism’s position as an agent of sustainable development, illustrated in the core values of public education, respect for diversity, authenticity of programmes or projects, and preservation of heritage. They (Gupta & Dada) observed that cultures are mobilised for tourists and read by tourists within particular settings and focused on the learning and transmission of meanings using symbols and objects. Titus & Spencer (2015) who connected cultural tourism to slow tourism in their research referred slow tourism as the practice of quality time spent by visitors, mostly in areas with natural resources such as protected parks, heritage sites, and gardens. They asserted that engaging in slow tourism activities do allow visitors to experience the destination at a much deeper level.
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The development of sustainable cultural heritage tourism in Malaysia :implication for planning and management

The development of sustainable cultural heritage tourism in Malaysia :implication for planning and management

Knowledge leading to improvements in the development of cultural heritage tourism is important, as knowledge is a primary means of strengthening its positive aspects and simultaneously mitigating its negative aspects, so that development can maintain a long-term viability. This study also explores some of the key management issues relating to the development of cultural heritage tourism at both Federal and State levels. A broad understanding is necessary for providing a firm basis in prescribing a thorough and realistic sustainable development framework. The study employs questionnaires, surveys, and interviews with a range of government officials, local communities, and tourists. The findings indicate that the government has played a major role in shaping the development of sustainable cultural heritage tourism in Malaysia, but at present there are many shortcomings that need to be addressed, such as definitions of the term Cultural Heritage, as well as management issues, including conflicts and bureaucratic barriers. These problems, consequently, hinder a comprehensive management of cultural heritage tourism. Additional findings indicate that local communities are not actively involved in tourism planning or decision-making processes, though they generally are satisfied with development at the locations of this study. The study also calls for higher quality tourist services, and the promotion of other elements of cultural heritage to compliment the already established yet limited elements. Finally, it suggests a Sustainable Cultural Heritage Tourism Framework, incorporating social and cultural elements. This thesis contributes new knowledge to the field of cultural heritage tourism in Malaysia and may serve as a starting point for researchers interested in this area. Furthermore, the results of this study are expected to be useful for guiding policy actions in the future.
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Cultural political economy and urban heritage tourism

Cultural political economy and urban heritage tourism

It is premised, second, on the idea that urban heritage tourism reflects important relationships between the economic/political and the cultural/semiotic. CPE represents a direct response to criticisms of political economy sometimes being insufficiently concerned with culture and semiotics, and of cultural perspectives which can pay insufficient attention to the economy, thus neglecting the materiality of social relations. Based on a review of CPE studies in urban research, Ribera- Fumaz (2009, p. 453) argues that they seek either “a cultural perspective on the city that also takes material-economic matters seriously and/or a political economy that recognizes the limits of purely materialistic accounts of urban processes”. A CPE approach to urban heritage tourism seeks to seriously engage with the socio-cultural determinants of material change, and also the material determinants of societal change. It represents a response to Bianchi’s (2009, p. 498) assertion that tourism research needs to be “simultaneously sensitive to the plural subjectivities and cultural diversities within contemporary societies and grounded in a structural analysis of the material forces of power and inequality within globalizing capitalism and liberalized modes of tourism development”.
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Tourism and Cultural Heritage: Higher Education and Entrepreneurship Development in Transition Phase. The Tunisian Experience

Tourism and Cultural Heritage: Higher Education and Entrepreneurship Development in Transition Phase. The Tunisian Experience

Moreover, this historical moment, in Tunisia there is room to build up new relationships between Tunisian citizens, public institutions and organizations whether firms, associations and administrations and thus lay down the premises of a new model of society based on freedom and democracy. In the same time, there is a need to implement a new economic development model to sustain the new model of society.

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Cultural political economy and urban heritage tourism

Cultural political economy and urban heritage tourism

It is premised, second, on the idea that urban heritage tourism reflects important relationships between the economic/political and the cultural/semiotic. CPE represents a direct response to criticisms of political economy sometimes being insufficiently concerned with culture and semiotics, and of cultural perspectives which can pay insufficient attention to the economy, thus neglecting the materiality of social relations. Based on a review of CPE studies in urban research, Ribera- Fumaz (2009, p. 453) argues that they seek either “a cultural perspective on the city that also takes material-economic matters seriously and/or a political economy that recognizes the limits of purely materialistic accounts of urban processes”. A CPE approach to urban heritage tourism seeks to seriously engage with the socio-cultural determinants of material change, and also the material determinants of societal change. It represents a response to Bianchi’s (2009, p. 498) assertion that tourism research needs to be “simultaneously sensitive to the plural subjectivities and cultural diversities within contemporary societies and grounded in a structural analysis of the material forces of power and inequality within globalizing capitalism and liberalized modes of tourism development”.
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Development of a normative model for cultural tourism on the Cape Flats

Development of a normative model for cultural tourism on the Cape Flats

The way in which The Gambia is marketed, is a central part of the process of implementing responsible tourism principles in The Gambia. They seek to grow the industry by attracting market segments, which value the natural and cultural heritage assets of The Gambia. They seek to differentiate The Gambia from other sun, sand and sea destinations – they enjoy high levels of repeat business and seek to build on those elements of the product, which encourage repeat visiting. It is recognised that further development of the industry in The Gambia, and investment in it, is dependent upon planning and product development, which meet requirements of the evolving market. It is also recognised that the kinds of tourists that are attracted, are by the way in which The Gambia is developed and presented as a tourism product. This is particularly relevant for development of a normative framework for cultural tourism on the Cape Flats.
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Cross-Cultural Differences in Adopting Mobile Augmented Reality at Cultural Heritage Tourism Sites

Cross-Cultural Differences in Adopting Mobile Augmented Reality at Cultural Heritage Tourism Sites

Theoretical contributions This study provides several theoretical contributions. This is a unique study exploring the under- researched topic of cultural differences within the AR cultural heritage tourism context. In general, there has been limited research on AR adoption and acceptance factors, according to tom Dieck and Jung (2015). Furthermore, there is limited AR-related research on cultural differences in the tourism and hospitality context; consequently, it has been unknown how cultural traits influence AR acceptance. This study bridged the gap addressing the aforementioned limited research. In addition, with regard to cultural differences and technology adoption, only a small number of previous studies have applied a structural equation model (e.g., Matzler et al., 2016; Srite & Karahanna, 2006). By drawing on a structural equation model, this study empirically tested the effect of cultural differences on the causal sequence toward behavioral intention to use AR. Nevertheless, the findings showed no relationship between the impact of utilitarian components of AR and the masculinity/femininity culture types. This is partly consistent with findings from a study by Srite and Karahanna (2006) that revealed that masculinity/femininity values do not moderate the relationship between perceived usefulness and behavioral intentions. On the contrary, the importance of the hedonic component of AR and social influence were perceived differently in the Western and Eastern countries. Again, this is partly consistent with results from previous studies (e.g., Harris et al., 2005; Srite & Karahanna, 2006; Venkatesh & Morris, 2000). Another interesting finding is that aesthetics was found to be the strongest attribute of perceived enjoyment in both countries. This result demonstrates that the aesthetic features of AR can indeed induce hedonic perceptions. In addition, the inclusion of aesthetics added significantly to the existing pool of knowledge. In fact, previous studies that investigated this area focused solely on utilitarian components of AR, such as perceived usefulness and ease of use (e.g., Vlahakis et al., 2001), or the functional quality of AR.
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Intangible Cultural Heritage and Sustainable Tourism in Córdoba, Spain

Intangible Cultural Heritage and Sustainable Tourism in Córdoba, Spain

Moreover, the tourists decide to travel because they have internal and external motivations [6] and in some specific types of tourism the culture becomes one of the principal attractions. In turn, one must analyses both the destination, since a great diversity of sites exist, and the different variables that affect each of them [2]. At the same time, there is strong competition between the destinations to attract tourists, especially international ones [11]. In fact, heritage is one of the attributes that differentiates some sites from others, due to the complex system in which the destination is included and to the sustainable development with many facets in which the cultural inheritance has to be preserved [25-15]. In this regard, it is necessary to reinforce in the tourism destination such aspects as the quality of the accommodations, cleanliness, citizen safety and gastronomy, adapting them to the needs of this type of tourists. According to Abuamoud et al. [9] the demand of tourists in the heritage sites is also influenced by the services provided by the public authorities and by the availability and feasibility of the local community to stimulate tourism in these areas. In this regard, it becomes necessary to identify and understand the types of heritage tourists, their motivations, behaviour, perceptions and experiences in order to carry out better management of the destinations and to define the corresponding adapted strategies, seeking as a priority the sustainability and safeguarding of the heritage that makes them unique. In short, better knowledge of the tourist that visits these places implies an improvement in the management of the destination, seeking, above all, the sustainability of the historical heritage that attracts this type of tourist.
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Cultural Heritage Landscape and Rural Development

Cultural Heritage Landscape and Rural Development

Slowly, Nympheo made a comeback. The community rejected the idea of economic growth for its own sake but envisioned a development model based on environmental protection and historic preservation. Soon people recognized the quality of life that the village and surrounding landscape offered and returned or became weekend residents. New arrivals also came to settle and repair or construct new homes in harmony with traditional structures. Today, Nympheo is doing well and is known throughout Greece for the community’s efforts. Nympheo has been classified as a landscape of outstanding natural beauty and is now protected by the Hellenic Ministry of Culture. Several cultural events are held throughout the year associated with local regional agricultural products and a local women’s group has formed a commercial cooperative to collectively produce, market and sell homemade sweets and traditional recipes. But the community remains vigilant and regularly holds community meetings to discuss ongoing or proposed projects and new problems. They have begun to develop tourist activities such as hiking, horseback riding and ecotourism, and several historic homes have been converted to small hotels and restaurants. The community remains cautious of tourism and its potential impact; therefore they have taken steps to carefully manage its implementation.
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Between Tourism and Intangible Cultural Heritage

Between Tourism and Intangible Cultural Heritage

The first study is that conducted by Azizan Marzuki (2011). He identified local residents’ perception towards impacts from tourism development in Langkawi Island, Malaysia from the costs and benefits aspects brought by the growth of the tourism industry. He conducted a household survey to explore the impacts of tourism development to local resident from the perspectives of economic, social and environmental. Although, a sample size of 383 respondents was obtained based on a total population of 73,091 people in Langkawi, 784 respondents were approached, which exceeded the sample size. Out of this, 392 questionnaires (50%) were completed. He used principal component analysis to explore 24 items, but only 21 items were usable after having assessed them through the reliability analysis. Although, Azizan’s findings showed local residents generally benefit from tourism development, either socio-economically or economically, there are negative impacts on physical developments as well as cultural deterioration. Azizan found that a mean of only 3.78 responses indicate that tourism causes changes in traditional cultures, following responses (mean of 3.95) that suggest tourism development has changed the island landscape (Table 1). Table 1 also showed, a very low mean of 3.29 that tourism has decreased employment in traditional sectors. Although these costs of tourism development are relatively low, their benefits are higher. Table 2, presents the mean values of the benefits of the tourism sector. Out of six (6) items listed, only one (1) is related directly to cultural heritage, which apparently is tangible rather than intangible heritage. This item, ‘tourism has encouraged local government to restore historical buildings,’ has a mean value of 3.98. On another observation, Azizan found a relatively high mean values of 4.27 and 4.13 respectively, for items on how ‘tourism has improved the quality of life of local residents’, and ‘interaction with foreign tourists is a positive experience for local residents’. Although, they appear related to locals’ way of life, it is not certain if they are related to intangible heritage. The socio-economic benefits (Table 3) seem to outweigh the previous effects of tourism development in Langkawi. The mean values for socio-economic benefits on tourism development are generally greater than 4.10.
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Quality of the development of cultural tourism for the development od Istria

Quality of the development of cultural tourism for the development od Istria

Master thesis Is divided into seven mutually related parts, including the introduction and conclusion. The introductory part serves to explain the subject matter and problem, goals and purpose of the thesis, as well as determining guidelines and contribution of the thesis. In the second part the theoretical overview of tourism, as a phenomenon of global proportions will be stated, including its selective forms based on the works of domestic and foreign authors. Third part is dedicated to theoretical interpretation of the term, general features of cultural tourism, interdependence of culture and tourism in that selective form of tourism, and importance of valorisation and revitalisation of culture of and cultural inheritance in tourism. Likewise, there are represented forms of cultural tourism and features of demand for cultural tourism, as well as global trends of cultural tourism on a global scale. Fourth part refers to Istra, it’s natural resources and traditional and cultural heritage. The fifth part explains the main part of the thesis, and how it could be refuted, intended to prove the thesis. This part touches on the subject of existing problems in development of cultural tourism in Istra, and potential solutions to the aforementioned problems. A more optimistic approach is explained in the sixth part, as a result of creation and realization of a project called “Istra inspirit”. The project is a perfect example of live history projects, which presents Istra to tourist as a cultural tourist destination in a fun and realistic way. Seventh, and the last part of the thesis is the conclusion, and after it there is a list of references used in this work.
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Tourism development in world heritage urban areas

Tourism development in world heritage urban areas

The Portuguese Tourism Plan of 1985 stated for the first time a philosophy of development and not merely a growth concept. The objectives stated in this Plan over passed the mere targeting of export-earnings and pointed also at imbalance of regional differentials and asymmetries, a better quality of life and protection of natural environment and enhancement of the country´ s cultural heritage, strategically pointing out key areas for development (Lourenço, 1989:24). Although this Plan has not been effectively implemented, it has left ideas and strategies that twenty years past, a multitude of actors is taking on. For example, Porto is the assumed lynch-pin of the Northern Region of Portugal. Also, several routes have been designed and implemented, nowadays crossing national boundaries and connecting also to Spanish regions of Galicia and Castilla y Léon. The networking and institutional re-arrangement towards concentration and innovative management has been taking place slowly but on a consistent basis.
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Management Issues and the Values of Safeguarding the Intangible Cultural Heritage for Cultural Tourism Development: The Case of Ashendye Festival, Lalibela, Ethiopia

Management Issues and the Values of Safeguarding the Intangible Cultural Heritage for Cultural Tourism Development: The Case of Ashendye Festival, Lalibela, Ethiopia

Intangible cultural heritage includes among many other customs, skills and practices the Christmas traditions, festivals, small craft building skills, the languages and cultural knowledge the tourist destination. In Ethiopia, Amhara region is one of the homes of a lot of cultural heritages. Lalibela is one of the most famous attraction sites of the region. Ashendye is the great festivals which are unique intangible cultural heritages in and surroundings of Lalibela. This great event takes place in August to mark the ending of the two weeks fasting period called 'Filseta'. The name 'Filseta' is given to remember the supposition of the Virgin Mary or the rising of St. Mary's Corpse (LTCTO, 2017). Ashendye festival also represents many intangible aspects and activities of our everyday lives, including the stories, the holidays, the family events, our community gatherings, the languages, the songs, create and perform, knowledge of natural spaces, beliefs and practices and special community occasions (ARSCTO, 2015).
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Communities of Practice, Identity and Tourism: Evidence on Cultural Heritage Preservation in World Heritage Sites

Communities of Practice, Identity and Tourism: Evidence on Cultural Heritage Preservation in World Heritage Sites

By   being   a   World   Heritage   Site,   destinations   strongly   promote   their   tourism   industry   and  tend  to  attract  increasing  number  of  international  and  domestic  tourists  (Yang,  Lin   and  Han,  2010,  p.  828;  UNESCO,  2008;  James,  2010).  For  example,  tourists  coming  to   Hoi  An  do  not  only  experience,  imagine  and  appreciate  the  place’s  historical  purified   and  peaceful  spirit  but  seek  to  buy  a  lantern  within  the  ambience  of  the  heritage  place,   even   including   those   not   participating   in   the   festival.   This   is   considered   as   the   authenticity  of  local  heritage  and  cultural  event  (Di  Giovine,  2009;  James,  2010,  p.17;   Trinh   et   al,   2014).   The   same   applies   to   the   fire   festivals   held   in   Vall   de   Boí,   in   the   framework  of  the  Pyrenees  mountain  ranges.  The  interaction  between  residents  and   tourists   alike   in   common   cultural   activities   serves   to   support   the   continuation   of   traditions   that   would   otherwise   be   lost   (UNESCO,   2008,   p.   42).   Economically,   opportunities  in  heritage  tourism  site  attracts  a  remarkable  business  immigrants  (Hall   and  Rath,  2007).  Such  fundamental  expression  of  contemporary  mobility  contributes  to   both  production  and  consumption  of  the  place  (Hall  and  Rath,  2007,  p.  3),  which  in  this   case  refer  to  services  around  local  festivals.    
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Tourism potential analysis of the castles of Vinalopó, Spain: an opportunity for social and tourist development of cultural heritage

Tourism potential analysis of the castles of Vinalopó, Spain: an opportunity for social and tourist development of cultural heritage

Department of Regional Geographical Analysis and Physical Geography, University of Alicante, Spain Abstract Within the overall framework of the renewal process of coastal tourist destinations, cultural heritage has frequently been used as a key argument for the introduction and development of strategies for the diversification and differentiation of the traditional tourist product based on sun and sand. This is the situation of the province of Alicante, identified with the Costa Blanca geotourism brand, where there are important economic issues that could contribute to the renewal of this coastal tourist destination. One of the most significant heritage values of this space consists of a series of medieval fortresses located along the axis of the Vinalopó River, which has acted since prehistoric times as a natural route from within the provincial mainland to the coast. It is precisely the argument of this historical, territorial and landscape content that has been used repeatedly in recent years to develop initiatives aimed at the creation of a tourist product, currently inexistent, based on the route of the castles of Vinalopó. This communication aims to analyse the degree of tourism potential of the fortresses located in the towns of Biar, Banyeres de Mariola, Sax, Villena, Novelda, Elda, Petrer and Elche, which constitute the core of municipalities where these medieval fortresses are located, finally pointing out some proposals for the creation of a heritage tourism product.
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Tourism and Cultural Heritage: Sector Priorities of Regional Development Policy within Bucharest-Ilfov Region

Tourism and Cultural Heritage: Sector Priorities of Regional Development Policy within Bucharest-Ilfov Region

Known as the Little Paris during the interwar period, Bucharest still has a relevant historical and cultural heritage, which has hardly survived to the destructive urban policy of the eighties, when approx. 450 hectares of the built city centre were demolished. The Romanian capital city is still the most important historical and cultural centre of the country and has a high potential for business and cultural tourism. Both cultural and business tourism contribute to growing flows of tourists, as demonstrated by the low seasonal fluctuations. The accommodation capacity in the region has increased. Incoming tourism in the Bucharest-Ilfov region increased mainly due to the increase of foreign tourists attracted by increasing opportunities relating to business and culture. The overall contribution of the tourism sector to job creation and GDP formation is in the rise and its further increase shall be supported by marketing oriented information and promotion.
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The natural and cultural heritage as development forces

The natural and cultural heritage as development forces

rience shows that projects based on citizen participation are more robust and successful over time. This is visible in Norway in connec- tion with the formation of a Landscape Park in Herand. Several public meetings were held, where the participants agreed that the natural and cultural heritage was a positive resource for their area. The result was a project built on collective responsibility for the future of the local environment.

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