Top PDF DISPUTE RESOLUTION - INFORMAL RESOLUTION PROCESS (Rule )

DISPUTE RESOLUTION - INFORMAL RESOLUTION PROCESS (Rule )

DISPUTE RESOLUTION - INFORMAL RESOLUTION PROCESS (Rule )

PURPOSE OF THE INFORMAL RESOLUTION PROCESS: To identify and discuss disputed issues in an attempt to resolve the dispute(s). It's an opportunity for the parties to ensure they have complete information, clear up any misunderstandings or miscommunication involving factual issues and allow the parties to identify the specific evidence they are relying on to support their respective positions. Evidence may include, but is not limited to, specific medical records, a medical opinion, witness statements, affidavits, reference to specific law or rule, or reference to prior hearing decisions by the Commissioner or the Vermont Supreme Court that may be applicable and set precedent on the particular issues in dispute.
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Dispute System Design and Bias in Dispute Resolution

Dispute System Design and Bias in Dispute Resolution

For justice as process, we must examine how an agency has designed the process, such as the specific nature of access (on paper or in person), nature of the process for raising the challenge (adjudicatory, consensus- based, or negotiated), or its timing before or after agency action. As an example of a decision process, one definition of perfect procedural justice might include a throw of the dice or the random draw of a draft number in the Vietnam War. For justice as outcome, the rule of law provides deci- sion standards that determine the substance of what a disputant achieves or receives, such as at-will employment, a statutory standard for discrimi- nation like Title VII, or a burden and standard of proof like preponder- ance of the evidence or beyond a reasonable doubt that define when someone is guilty.
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Learning and Bargaining in Dispute Resolution: Theory and Evidence from Medical Malpractice Litigation

Learning and Bargaining in Dispute Resolution: Theory and Evidence from Medical Malpractice Litigation

Lengthy legal procedures and high legal costs are among the main drawbacks of the current litigation system in the United States. This paper studies the dispute resolution process with special emphasis on the dynamic patterns of litigation and settlement as well as the legal costs incurred and associated payments. I propose a dynamic bargaining model of dispute resolution with learning, estimate the model using micro data on medical malpractice disputes, and use the estimated model to assess the impact of proposed tort reforms. In my model the plaintiff and the defendant do not have a common prior on the probability of winning court judgment and learning takes place as they bargain. In the equilibrium, a trade-off between the legal costs of delaying agreement and the possibility of learning new information determines the dynamic patterns of litigation and settlement. Estimation results show that the model fits all aspects of the data well and learning plays a quantitatively important role in explaining the dynamic patterns of litigation and settlement. Using the estimated model, I conduct policy experiments to assess some of the proposed tort reforms. I find that capping jury awards or eliminating the contingency fee rule significantly shortens the expected time to resolution and lowers the expected total legal costs. Since shorter legal procedures would reduce congestion in the legal system and savings of legal costs would lower the deadweight loss of litigation, I conclude that these reforms could have important welfare implications. On the other hand, “loser-pay-all” allocation of legal fees delay resolution and increase costs.
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Learning and Bargaining in Dispute Resolution: Theory and Evidence from Medical Malpractice Litigation

Learning and Bargaining in Dispute Resolution: Theory and Evidence from Medical Malpractice Litigation

To study this process, I propose a dynamic model in which, following the occurrence of an alleged instance of medical malpractice, the plainti¤ and the defendant bargain over a settlement. At any time during the negotiation, as long as no agreement has been reached, the plainti¤ has the option of …ling a lawsuit that would initiate the litigation phase. If no agreement is reached during the litigation phase, the case is resolved in court, where a jury verdict determines whether the defendant is liable and, if so the award to the plainti¤. In any period prior to the termination of a dispute, the defendant must pay his legal cost which I allow to di¤er depending on whether or not the plainti¤ has …led a lawsuit. In particular, the defendant’s legal costs are typically higher during the litigation phase, which entails additional legal procedures with respect to the pre-litigation phase. On the other hand, the plainti¤’s legal costs are a …xed fraction of the compensation payment and are paid upon resolution of the dispute (the so-called “contingency fee rule”).
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Crowdsourced online dispute resolution

Crowdsourced online dispute resolution

Luz, Poblet, Silva (2016, p. 285) identify three manifestations of the rela- tionship between crowdsourcing and ODR, namely, (1) the use of ODR to aggregate micro-task output data, (2) the use of crowdsourcing to retrieve relevant information for ODR, and (3) the use of crowdsourcing to model an ODR through workflows of micro-tasks. In the first manifestation, ODR is used as a tool, which facilitates the aggregation of information gathered through crowdsourcing. For example, ODR can be used to distinguish between correct and incorrect information provided by crowdsourcing workers. In the second manifestation, the parties of ODR procedures receive crowdsourcing information which can be helpful for the resolution of the dis- pute. For instance, the crowd may provide the parties with suggestions on how to resolve the dispute. In the third manifestation, a part of or an entire ODR procedure is conducted by crowdsourced workers who act as computa- tional units and their efforts are integrated with the ODR process. In the first manifestation, crowdsourcing exploits ODR. In the second and the third man- ifestations, ODR exploits crowdsourcing (cf. Luz, Poblet, Silva, 2016, p. 285). While Rule and Nagarajan (2010) provide a general discussion on CODR, they did not define it and analyse it in details. In order to fill this gap in the literature, Van den Herik and Dimov (2011a) defined this new type of dispute resolution, described the present state of play, and built a theoretical framework by investigating CODR building blocks. The definition of CODR provided by Van den Herik and Dimov is based on the definition of ODR provided by Kaufmann-Kohler and Schultz (cf. Van den Herik and Dimov, 2011a, p. 245; Kaufmann-Kohler and Schultz, 2004, p. 7). 48 The definition of
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The viability of applying alternative dispute resolution processes in the Niger Delta conflict

The viability of applying alternative dispute resolution processes in the Niger Delta conflict

All these questions have been answered by the various pieces of World Bank and USAID sponsored research on ADR in Nigeria. One of such sponsored research projects led to the setting up of the Lagos Multi-Door Courthouse (LMDC), the first court-connected ADR centre to be established in Africa on 11 June 2002, which has helped in freeing the court’s judicial resources for those cases which could not be resolved by the parties themselves. Thus, the Multi-Door Courthouse has become a convenient dispute clearinghouse for Nigeria’s bogged down courts system. Disputing parties also have the option of participating in an informal, yet structured process that reduces the costs, time and emotional strain that are usually associated with litigation. Between 2002 and 2006, the LMDC handled a total of 268 cases, with a turn-around time of 3 months from filing to case disposal. In one case, a trial judge referred the parties, one of whom was Nigeria’s former Vice President, Dr. Alex Ekwueme, to the LMDC after 17 long years in court. The matter was settled the same day, to the surprise and relief of all parties (Uzoechina 2008).
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Development the a dispute resolution framework to improve the efficiency of dispute resolution in Saudi construction projects

Development the a dispute resolution framework to improve the efficiency of dispute resolution in Saudi construction projects

E8 is more critical of arbitration; he complains of high cost to private business, potentially more so than litigation, the cost of which is largely borne by the state. As a relatively formal process compared to other methods of ADR it can be a lengthy process. E15 agrees; “arbitration is within the framework of official litigation and we prefer those alternatives with more flexibility which are far away from being officially imposed and highly expensive measures, which involve longer procedures for both sides of dispute”. The time taken by the arbitration process is commented upon by A3; “time is considered as negative point of arbitration since it takes a long time to resolve a dispute in SCP. I should remind you that I took part in arbitration for a case that took three years and this is not shorter than the time litigation takes to resolve a construction project dispute.” Interviewee A4 asserts that “one of characteristics of the arbitration method is that it is based on obligation with no executive power. After arbitration has concluded, litigation is still likely to be involved and, due to some prohibition in a country, for example, usury, the judge may reject what has been concluded during the arbitration process. Some domestic or international companies therefore pursue their case to the Gulf Arbitration Centre in Bahrain, or to the Paris Bureau, or Arbitration Centre in London”.
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Alternative Dispute Resolution: A Critical Reconsideration

Alternative Dispute Resolution: A Critical Reconsideration

62. In particular, procedural formality may no longer be the sure guarantor of fairness of outcome that it once was. The reason is that not all national creeds include racial fair- ness. For example, in South Africa during Apartheid, the official values were overtly racist. The national regime oppressed blacks and treated them as second-class citizens. There, a black with a broken-down car could hope for kindly treatment from a passing motorist or pedestrian more readily than from a representative of the official regime. The same was true in the American South during slavery and Jim Crow. An occasional white southerner might extend blacks a helping hand in situations where the authorities were unlikely to do so. The relationship between fairness and formality, in short, is contingent and varies over time and from place to place. What is the situation in the U.S. today? Our society now embraces official neglect (“colorblindness”) and worries more about reverse racism and quotas than relieving historical injustice. We deport Latinos, bar Muslims from entry, and tell Blacks that affirmative action’s days are numbered. In short, we may well be approach- ing a point where, as in South Africa, a disempowered minority citizen may hope for better treatment from an informal source than from an official one—a magistrate or judge enforc- ing brutally cool, uncaring laws.
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Your guide to. Dispute Resolution

Your guide to. Dispute Resolution

a way of assessing the options and exploring what might lead to an outcome that everyone can live with. A mediator can help you and the other participants have a respectful, evenhanded discussion and decision making process. Your role is to listen to the other points of view, contribute to the discussion and make decisions. Mediation may be voluntary, court ordered, or required as part of a contract or external dispute resolution arrangement. When is mediation suitable?

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Dispute Resolution in Construction Industry

Dispute Resolution in Construction Industry

Thus to cover these uncertainties effective documentation is required but everything cannot be put on paper as and when one prepare new condition in the contract people start finding the loop holes or the new way to raise the claims with the owner and disputes cannot be avoided. Disputes over a contract usually develop in one of the two ways either to preclude a true meeting of minds of the parties or one of them may become sick of his bargain and attempt to renege by seeking loopholes in the contract. Thus disputes cannot be avoided .Only thing which can be done is one can minimize the disputes by taking proper stage to give justice to both the parties. Presently the major issue before the construction industry is to minimize the disputable situations. This can effectively do by proper contract documentation. For this purpose the conditions of contract are essential to be studied as well as basic understanding of various legal provisions is essential for the engineers and the contractors. In past, trend was that the disputes were solved in the courts but this process was very much time consuming and complex, as our law system is outdated. There are many cases which are pending in the court from last 20 to 40 years. Presently the method of solving the disputes is arbitration as per the Indian Arbitration Act 1940 and thus experienced technocrats, who act as arbitrators, solve the disputes outside the courts But there are some limitations in this system also and it became outdated as many companies & government organization felt that this us nit an effective method of dispute solving so they have omitted the clause of arbitration from their contract documents. Hence new thought has to be given to handle disputes and it is required to minimize cost of the project. There is need for effective contract documentation as well as modification in the present arbitration system.
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An Evaluation of the use of ADR in the Nigerian Public Construction Project Disputes

An Evaluation of the use of ADR in the Nigerian Public Construction Project Disputes

that could prevent the realisation of this goal. The main objective of any dispute-resolution mechanism according to [35] therefore is to ensure that the duties under the contract are fulfilled and to provide compensation for any breaches of these duties. Taylor and Carn [36]’s research indicates that construction disputes must be resolved as quickly as possible to preserve professional relationships and the perpetuity of the commercial construction business. However, in the opinion of [37], dispute prevention is always better than dispute resolution. Cheung et al [38] also posit that it is practical to prevent aggravation of the negative impacts on project performance, and to manage the dispute proactively and aim for early settlement. In this way, the parties will be able to prevent claims and conflict from escalating to disputes. Although dispute resolution is supported by many researchers, it is desirable to be prevented and effected in the early days of the claims in other to save time and cost. The work can then progress while the parties may seek further resolution in cases where total and final resolution has not been achieved. Dispute resolution techniques have been seen by many researchers as a spectrum ranging from the most informal negotiations between the parties themselves, through increasing formality and more directive intervention from external sources, to a full court hearing with strict rules of procedure (Office of government Commerce, 2002 cited in [39]). These procedures include negotiation, mediation, conciliation, neutral evaluation, expert determination, adjudication, arbitration and litigation. Arbitration and litigation however, appear to be the oldest forms of dispute resolution techniques. Carmichael (2002 cited in [40]) suggested that the step of approaches to disputes resolution should be as follows:
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Panel I: Negotiating Arbitration Clauses

Panel I: Negotiating Arbitration Clauses

P1: Close. We were down to about five until we got [Redacted], and [Redacted] had about fifty. Slowly, they would be sold off. Right now, I think there is about fifteen, and those will probably be sold . . . . So, we really are not in the business of owning real estate. We are in the business of either managing hotels or franchising the hotels, which is licensing out the brand. When you think about a managed hotel, there is an owner who signs an agreement with us to manage the hotel. Those agreements are normally twenty, thirty, forty, even fifty years. Even as you look back at the first hotel in 1957, which is not in the system anymore, the second hotel from that year is in the system still. Some of those agreements can last for quite a while. So, as you think about dispute resolution and where the company is and where it wants to go, it is not necessarily a quick transition as you move through those 7,000 hotels. As they get sold, as new agreements get entered into, it is a slow process. So, it is not unusual for me to see agreements from thirty years ago, where the dispute resolution provisions are quite unsophisticated and different from what we are doing now.
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Dispute Avoidance and Resolution (literature review)

Dispute Avoidance and Resolution (literature review)

Court processes by means of litigation is traditionally the primary means of dispute resolution in the construction industry. Australia inherited the common law of England and Wales including the English court systems. Of importance is the English Arbitration Act 1697. This Act formalised arbitration in England by providing a procedure which enabled parties to a civil action to refer their matter to arbitration to be resolved as a judgement of the court (Astor & Chinkin 2002). Over time Australia has adapted to suit the needs of Australian industry and developed specialised courts and tribunal systems for resolving disputes (Fenn et al 1998). The evolution of modern dispute resolution techniques is mainly accredited to the various techniques developed and implemented by institutions in the United States. The Arbitration Society of America was founded in 1922 by Francis Kellor as the first formal organisation to implement dispute resolution services. Two years later another organisation, the Arbitration Foundation was formed. With the backing and collaboration of the Arbitration Society the United States Arbitration Act was enacted in 1925. The Act provided the first legally enforceable framework for agreements to arbitrate over any ‘controversy’. In 1926 the Arbitration Society and the Arbitration Foundation amalgamated to form the American Arbitration Association (AAA) which has become the prominent driving force for the development of dispute resolution services and guidelines. It is the AAA which provides guidance rules for arbitration clauses and procedures that the American Institute of Architects (AIA) has used arbitration in standard forms of contracts for over the past century. Despite litigations and arbitrations ability to produce a final and binding decision, the construction industry has sought the establishment of informal processes for the quick and effective resolution of disputes. Alternative Dispute Resolution is providing various possibilities in lieu of the costly and time-consuming litigation. ADR is broadly defined as “…any method by which conflicts and disputes are resolved privately and other than through litigation in the public courts [Kovach, 2004]. ADR can include both binding and non binding procedures. The development of a sliding scale of ADR techniques has evolved over the years including a progression from self-deterministic to third part impose methods including negotiation , mediation, conciliation, neutral evaluation, expert determination, adjudication, arbitration and others [eg Cheeks, 2003; Cheung et al, 2000, International, 2001; Kellog, 1999; Office of Government Commerce, 2002; Vorster, 1993].”
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Customer enquiry, complaint and dispute resolution process

Customer enquiry, complaint and dispute resolution process

We endeavour to resolve all complaints at the first point of contact. However, there are some instances where this is not possible and further investigation may be required. In these instances, we will acknowledge receipt of your complaint and aim to provide you with a resolution within the Regulatory Service Standards. Should we be unable to meet these timeframes, we will advise you of our suggested course of action and timeframe, as well as the name of a contact person for any further queries regarding this matter.

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Dispute resolution in the workplace

Dispute resolution in the workplace

For many readers, their argument made enormous sense. Organizations have an impressive capacity to generate and nurture conflicts and enmity. Anyone who has worked within large organizations knows firsthand how disputes and rivalries among peers, and complaints against management, can consume significant amounts of time and energy, undermine morale, increase stress, detract from mission, and generally render an organization dysfunctional. Ironically, the formal procedures in place for addressing conflict often make matters worse. Most organizations’ complaint or grievance mechanisms are distrusted by the very people encouraged or required to use them. Generally, formal procedures are excruciatingly slow and debilitating for those who use them. Often parties to a formal grievance or complaint procedure must continue to interact and work together even while they are set against each other, awaiting a decision on their dispute. Equally important, because many organizations have no mechanisms for addressing issues for which there are not and cannot be formal rules or regulations, people often have to squeeze their dissatisfactions into the formats required by formal processes just to voice their dissatisfaction. For example, in many federal workplaces employees routinely use the Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) complaint procedure to address issues not even experienced as discrimination, simply because that is a way to get the complaint heard. Interestingly, some federal agencies adapted to this phenomenon by incorporating mediation programs into the EEO process. Originally REDRESS – the postal service’s mediation program – only allowed employees to get to mediation by formulating their concern as an EEO complaint even if the issues had nothing to do with discrimination.
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Therapeutic Jurisprudence and Child Protection

Therapeutic Jurisprudence and Child Protection

There is some debate about the extent to which due process safeguards are impacted by child protection mediation 5 and other informal dispute resolution processes.' [r]

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Erie County FCFC Dispute Resolution Process.

Erie County FCFC Dispute Resolution Process.

regarding conflicts among parents, agencies, and/or councils pertaining to the county council service coordination process or decisions made during the individual family service coordination process. The dispute must be concerning a decision made or a process proposed or implement during a phase of the county service coordination process regarding a family or child who is formally involved in the county Family and Children First service coordination. This includes a disagreement regarding the denial of acceptance of a family into the county service coordination process. Agencies, providers, or parent/legal guardians who have participated on a family service coordination plan team may request a dispute resolution review. The OFCF Service Coordination Committee will review such requests and make recommendations to the CC for its review and approval. With CC approval, the OFCF will respond, in writing to the county council requests for dispute resolution review within 30 days of the receipt of the request by the State Service Coordination Committee.
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Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR): Important Mechanisms of Consumer Dispute Resolution

Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR): Important Mechanisms of Consumer Dispute Resolution

From the definitions and descriptions given above, the arising questions regarding the meaning and scope of ADR is clearly answered. ADR can be defined as a dispute resolution process that is free from the assistance of the courts of law. Although it is difficult to clearly and precisely define ADR, its mechanisms are important and are of significant value and impact. For example, for legal practitioners, ADR are the main guidelines in improving access and the justice system even though its processes are not subject to inquiry, as it is with court trials, which clearly require detailed investigations to obtain the facts of the case. The ADR system is able to function in providing a fair solution to the conflict or dispute at hand even without the process of inquiry. The theories of ADR clearly highlight the many advantages and values that ensue due to the usage of ADR mechanisms. Disputing parties can also clearly identify their needs of specific expertise in handling the issues relating to the dispute through the main ADR mechanisms such as mediation proceedings, arbitration, negotiation and the hybrid methods like med-arb, mini-trial and many more. Generally, a hybrid dispute resolution process combines elements of two or more traditionally separate processes into one, such as in med- arb, where the mediator will act as an arbitrator if he is unable to resolve matters. As in mini-trial, the process is by combining between negotiations and mediation by both disputing parties in an unbinding adjudication process.
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Shared Solutions: An Overview Special Education Policy and Programs Branch Ministry of Education

Shared Solutions: An Overview Special Education Policy and Programs Branch Ministry of Education

Advisory Committees (SEAC), an informal dispute resolution process for issues related to programs and services for students with special education needs; and8. – a mandatory dispute re[r]

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RESOLVING    AND MANAGING CONFLICTS WITHOUT AGGRESSION IN INTERNATIONAL POLITICS BELLO, Adesina Temitayo (PhD)

RESOLVING AND MANAGING CONFLICTS WITHOUT AGGRESSION IN INTERNATIONAL POLITICS BELLO, Adesina Temitayo (PhD)

This article undertakes how conflicts which are of international origin could be resolved without using aggression, armament and the likes. This article argues that using aggression in resolving international conflicts leads to loss of lives and properties as well reduction in tourism in nations engaged in conflict. Negotiation which is an Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) mechanism and a non-violent dispute resolution process is highly recommended in this article as an alternative in resolving and managing conflicts without using any form of aggression in international conflicts. Taking recent events such as the Israel-Hamas conflict and the Rwandan genocide, this article shows that proper negotiation among leaders would have averted the unprecedented bloodshed. This article concludes that negotiation should be utilized more in promoting world peace and development.
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