Top PDF e learning project report

e learning project report

e learning project report

Acknowledgements There are two ways of spreading the light, to be a candle, or the mirror, which reflects it. In relation to the light of knowledge o, this work carried out by us is just a „mirror‟. There are some candles on the other side of the mirror. We would like to avail this opportunity to express our sincere thanks to all those who helped us in making this project. Even a most vivid collection of words, yield to express our heart fully thank towards one and all to have successfully assisted us in our expenditure of carrying out this project.

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Supporting Inter Professional Learning in Practice: Final project report

Supporting Inter Professional Learning in Practice: Final project report

5.1.17 The net result of the above is that as the IP project continues, it will need to move away from generalist applications to a more discrete and focused arrangement of IP learning opportunities (particularly in the year three module). This will necessitate the identification of what are called “strategic alliances” of students i.e. those students who are most likely to naturally work together in an expanding variety of health and social care settings (for example adult nursing students with physiotherapy students and medical students in NHS treatment centres. Learning disability nursing students and social work students in locality centres etc). To this end it is the intention to set up a working party (consisting of representation from UWE placement learning and programme teams) to continue to explore how such alliances can be created and the learning opportunities maximised.
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E-learning Appraisal Report

E-learning Appraisal Report

teachers having access to a professional e-learning support that they consult on a voluntary basis. This approach is good when only few teachers need support, but has limitations when scaling up. The collegial material development approach is when colleagues collaborate on developing e-learning material together. This approach is good for sharing knowledge and ideas, providing feedback, and reducing the time spent. At some point, professional e-learning support might be needed to increase and secure quality. The project management approach is when development teams use project management tools to control quality and resources. E-learning development needs skills and expertise to combine good pedagogical practice with an understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of different media, subject expertise, and knowledge about project planning. By working in development teams, guided by timelines, budgets and clear deliverables, the quality is likely to be higher, and the development cost controlled. This approach is the recommended approach for a sustainable e-learning development. The open content approach comprises use of free content, in combination with one of the other approaches for course development.
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E-LEARNING COURSE. Piloting Report

E-LEARNING COURSE. Piloting Report

o “I’m involved in a project about young caregivers”; o “I experienced myself”; o “Before this course I had never heard of young caregivers”. Question 7: What did you like the most about the e-learning course? There are numerous elements appreciated by the respondents, who for all the nationalities involved have concentrated mainly on some points:

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NINES Project : 7A Knowledge and Learning Report

NINES Project : 7A Knowledge and Learning Report

A principal intervention of the NINES project is to use DDSM technology at the household level to improve the management of the local electricity supply system. DDSM households were invited to complete survey feedback on their experiences. Of the nineteen surveys received, households’ identified cheaper and more efficient energy through NINES. Thus, a long-term consequence of the change in households’ electricity consumption has been considered based on the Shetland household electricity consumption data from The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS). The latest 2014 – 2015 data reports indicated that median household electricity demand for Shetland customers on “economy 7” tariff fell by 1.9% between 2014 and 2015 (from 7,043kWh to 6,908kWh. The “economy 7” electricity consumption data is used as it is the most closely match with the form of contract used for the majority of households which saw interventions through NINES. The reduction in electricity spending increased 223 DDSM household income by £35 for each year of operation, i.e. a total of £7,950 for all affected customers per year. Moreover, the economic impact of the additional income on the Shetland economy is equivalent to the additional £10,000 worth of economic output, £5,150 to the gross value added of the local economy, as well as 0.2 person years of FTE employment per year.
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End of Project Report People with a Learning Disability December 2012

End of Project Report People with a Learning Disability December 2012

Another carer told us ‘I just think it’s really important that carers get listened to (by healthcare staff). Often they know more about the person than the family do, especially carers with a lot of experience with the client.’ Many people with learning disabilities communicate in ways that other people find difficult to understand. The many reports written on this subject suggest that this issue affects between 50% and 90% of people with learning disabilities. If a person finds it difficult to express how they feel, make themselves understood or to fully understand what is happening in their own bodies, they are less likely to be able to alert family or support staff to early signs of ill health. The result therefore is likely to be inequality of access to and experience of healthcare. This issue can be an important contributing factor to diagnostic overshadowing, discussed earlier in Awareness and Early Diagnosis, p.20 and have a negative impact on timely diagnoses and treatment outcomes. As can be seen from the statistics collected by the Matron in Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS Foundation Trust (Admissions, p. 9), almost two-thirds of all learning disability cancer admissions during the last 3 years have been via A&E admissions, the outcomes of which were only 8 cancers being treatable whilst 12 have been palliative and 9 patients dying within 1 year, most much sooner.
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The NEPAD e-schools Demonstration Project: A Work in Progress. A Public Report. A PUBLICATION PREPARED FOR THE COMMONWEALTH OF LEARNING & infodev BY:

The NEPAD e-schools Demonstration Project: A Work in Progress. A Public Report. A PUBLICATION PREPARED FOR THE COMMONWEALTH OF LEARNING & infodev BY:

The Reality: While much is still to be learned, we are not starting from scratch One of the consortia pointed out during the first round of interviews with the M&E team that its members felt that a ‘demo project’ was superfluous because a large knowledgebase on best practices and lessons learned on the use of ICT in schools already exists – much of it African-based, compiled by organisations such as SchoolNet Africa and the South African Institute for Distance Education. While it is clear that there is still much to learn about the process of introducing ICTs in schools in African contexts, had the planning process for the e-Schools Initiative started with a review of the relevant existing literature, the consortium felt it may have facilitated a more value-added approach.
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Out of hours: final report of the project e-teaching leadership: planning and implementing a benefits-oriented costs model for technology enhanced learning

Out of hours: final report of the project e-teaching leadership: planning and implementing a benefits-oriented costs model for technology enhanced learning

programs and casual staffing; Burck Smith’s is based on Asian-economy tutors/markers. The mild caution of Snyder, Marginson and Lewis (2007) regarding the human costs of e- teaching and the unintended consequences of new technologies of teaching should be coupled with studies on Australia’s academic profession (Coates et al., 2009; Coates & Goedegebuure, 2010), which reveal a demoralised academic workforce. Coates et al. (2009) identified seven ‘attractiveness criteria’. Among these are several that are pertinent here: workload defined in terms of hours per week; opportunity for research; contract conditions; and environmental support in resources and management. Theirs is the most recent comprehensive study of reported work hours which differentiates by appointment level (assistant lecturer to professor). Australian academics overall report amongst the highest workloads in the world: full time staff in 2007 averaged 50 hours per week over the entire year, not merely during teaching periods: 18.3 hours on teaching compared with 14.6 on research, the remainder on administration, community service and ‘other’. This compares with ABS figures of 43 hours per week on average for all Australian employees (Lee, 2011). No data is given regarding types of teaching, or the influence of technology on academic tasks.
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MORAVIG: An Android Agent for the Project Mobile e Learning Session

MORAVIG: An Android Agent for the Project Mobile e Learning Session

Today, almost 400 universities offering MOOCs, and according to US News & World Report rankings [12], 22 of the top 25 US universities now offer online courses free of charge. Courses are currently offered in 13 languages, the vast majority in English (80%), followed by Spanish (8.5%), French (4%) and Chinese (3.5%). The main areas of courses are humanities, computer science and business administration. As shown in figure 4, we observe that Coursera is the market leader in MOOCs with 36% of provided courses, followed by edX with 36% of provided courses.
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LEARNING THROUGH TECHNOLOGY: A REPORT ON THE IMPLEMENTATION OF A “NEW” E-LEARNING TOOL

LEARNING THROUGH TECHNOLOGY: A REPORT ON THE IMPLEMENTATION OF A “NEW” E-LEARNING TOOL

\The results from the questionnaire confirm the importance of continuing this project and adding to our database. One of the main results was the time saved by students when writ- ing, and by the advisors when reviewing and providing guidance. The inherent repetitiveness of mistakes, be they grammar or spelling, was lessoned thanks to our database that made it impera- tive for students to correct their work before handing in their final version (Figure 8, and Figure 9 - Statement 4). Among comments received were that students appreciated the comprehensive nature and clarity of the instructions in the boilerplate, and the pre-formatting of margins, head- ings, etc. 79% of the students expressed their appreciation of the assistance given by the boil- erplate as regards remedying errors such as grammar, spelling, punctuation, and style. this in itself demonstrates that the boilerplate works well as a cognitive e-learning tool. In this respect, the results exceeded the authors’ expectations. students’ written english has improved in terms of both accuracy and style. One of the external examiners, who was also an examiner in 2009, commented that the quality of essays written this year had increased; to what extent this is due to the boilerplate alone is yet to be established, but the indications are that the tool has had a significant effect on student performance.
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HERTSMERE BOROUGH COUNCIL REPORT TO E-GOVERNMENT PROJECT BOARD

HERTSMERE BOROUGH COUNCIL REPORT TO E-GOVERNMENT PROJECT BOARD

§ Implementing CRM is a continual learning process and needs to be approached in manageable stages. § Not all service areas will be supportive of the project initially. § Following demonstrations of CRM products, early likely benefits are anticipated if CRM software was made available to customer services front facing staff where the early collection of information on customer interaction could help to build the business case for wider implementation across the authority.

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Report on the implementation of WP3 "Analyses and evaluation of the ICT level, e-learning and intercultural development in every participating country" in the framework of the IRNet project

Report on the implementation of WP3 "Analyses and evaluation of the ICT level, e-learning and intercultural development in every participating country" in the framework of the IRNet project

tations”, recommendations on recording video and audio for e-learning and other educational purposes; recording a multimedia presentation with the help of Professor A. Reis; analyzing mistakes and improving results. 4. An e-workshop “How to improve your didactic videos” (06.02.2015). All members of the IRNet project participated in presence and in remote environ- ment. The e-workshop was conducted by Professor Reis. The participants produced versions of multimedia presentation with narration and contributed to a video recorded for the workshop. The result of the first stage was a normal narrated presentation (http://youtu.be/0ZBk97F_3qo). At the second stage the same presentation was improved with the use of multimedia (http://youtu.be/ 90-98516IHA). As a result of the third stage, a presentation was demonstrated during the workshop using complementary narration techniques, nonverbal techniques and some multimedia improvements. During the workshop all participants discussed the aspects of improving multimedia presentations, video recording for educational purposes and shared opinions on future collaborative MOOCs. It was decided that the materials produced during the workshop will be used in the further elaboration of a MOOC.
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FINAL REPORT: AOC/SFA E-LEARNING ACADEMY PROJECT Christina Conroy OBE Project Director

FINAL REPORT: AOC/SFA E-LEARNING ACADEMY PROJECT Christina Conroy OBE Project Director

Business Model for Sustainability In addition to developing the qualification, framework and curriculum content, the Project also developed a business model for sustainability to ensure that the sector benefitted from this investment in two ways. Firstly, once the qualification and curriculum content had been developed by the e-learning consortium, each of the 8 Colleges was able to create regional e-learning Academies to train apprentices and Higher Level Apprentices, new graduates and adults in the skills to create blended and e-learning products in partnership with subject specialists. Secondly, it also developed a business model so that other colleges could join the consortium as a member organization and utilise the curriculum content and qualification framework to create their own e-Learning Academy. The concept of a shared brand and website, Design eLearn, was an important building block and portal to promote the Project and secure its future sustainability by offering an inclusive approach to other sector colleges.
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Mobile Learning Project Report

Mobile Learning Project Report

1. Introduction Mobile learning is not a new concept, learning whilst on the move or away from formal educational settings has been happening a long time with the use of books, journal articles, television, radio etc. However what is new is the vast array of devices now available to access learning and to take advantage of being mobile but still being able to capture information and share, collaborate and upload it to a worldwide audience. Mobile learning (mlearning) is a growing area of pedagogic research, however much of the research so far has focused taking traditional types of instructional learning and putting it on mobile devices, rather than using mobile devices for increased engagement in teaching sessions or for using the devices for capturing information as and when the students are mobile. Herrington et al (2009) claim that although mobile technologies have the potential to be used as powerful learning tools within higher education, “their current use appears to be predominantly within a didactic, teacher-centred paradigm, rather than a more constructivist environment” (p.2). Most mobile learning devices are centred around social learning, e.g. mobile phones, so their pedagogic potential needs to be further explored.
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Final Report of the Learning Together about Making Choices Project

Final Report of the Learning Together about Making Choices Project

Schools rely on the assumption that this supported self-regulation process will provide the answer to the establishment of the consistently stable working climate necessary to for both children and staff. They depend on an ever increasing and wide-ranging number of behaviour techniques and strategies to solve the problems they are having in achieving goals as professionals, and for most children they are effective. When teachers say they have tried everything and nothing works however we are brought back again to the plight of the child with an impaired attachment whose behaviour, as described above, is instinctive and self-protective. He cannot make choices or understand what that means because he is as unaware of his own behaviour as he is wary of others. He has no internal dialogue to rely on. He is hyper aware of negative attitudes towards himself, real or imaginary, but has no way to manage the threat other than to act instinctively. In these situations behaviour management strategies exacerbate both the child’s problem and that of the teacher attempting to take control. It is not a new problem. So common is it that the CELCIS report (CELCIS, no date), in its reference to children with impaired attachment, speaks of ‘predictable ‘ behaviours and suggests children are ‘excluded for things they do because of what has happened to them at home, what’s happened to them in their early years’ (op.cit.; p.15). Unless teachers understand where negative rejectionist behaviours come from they are likely to want to ‘manage’ rather than help and this creates a situational impasse. Once the teacher’s journey begins with understanding the reason for the behaviours the focus could shift from the child’s actions to those of the teacher and progress can then be made.
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Final Report of the Learning Together about Making Choices Project

Final Report of the Learning Together about Making Choices Project

punitive in nature but in more positive situations schools have policies geared towards encouraging children to change their behaviour, to be ‘the best that I can be’ and will teach self- regulation supported by a variety of reward systems. In the main, children do manage to alter their behaviour, to fit their behaviour to the occasion or select the appropriate behaviour for the circumstance. It is well documented for instance that children can use a playground language which does not appear in the classroom. They understand the choices they have, and even though it may take some time to learn to choose wisely, they can conduct an internal dialogue, they are aware of what they are doing. This is not the case for the child with unmet attachment needs. Schools rely on the assumption that this supported self-regulation process will provide the answer to the establishment of the consistently stable working climate necessary to for both children and staff. They depend on an ever increasing and wide-ranging number of behaviour techniques and strategies to solve the problems they are having in achieving goals as professionals, and for most children they are effective. When teachers say they have tried everything and nothing works however we are brought back again to the plight of the child with an impaired attachment whose behaviour, as described above, is instinctive and self-protective. He cannot make choices or understand what that means because he is as unaware of his own behaviour as he is wary of others. He has no internal dialogue to rely on. He is hyper aware of negative attitudes towards himself, real or imaginary, but has no way to manage the threat other than to act instinctively. In these situations behaviour management strategies exacerbate both the child’s problem and that of the teacher attempting to take control. It is not a new problem. So common is it that the CELCIS report (CELCIS, no date), in its reference to children with impaired attachment, speaks of ‘predictable ‘ behaviours and suggests children are ‘excluded for things they do because of what has happened to them at home, what’s happened to them in their early years’ (op.cit.; p.15). Unless teachers understand where negative rejectionist behaviours come from they are likely to want to ‘manage’ rather than help and this creates a situational impasse. Once the teacher’s journey begins with understanding the reason for the behaviours the focus could shift from the child’s actions to those of the teacher and progress can then be made.
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Modeling Projects in E-Learning Course: A Case of an Information Technology Project

Modeling Projects in E-Learning Course: A Case of an Information Technology Project

This objective is ensured by the establishment and sharing of digital learning content for higher education in the partner countries of South and East. This project brings support for the appropriation and transfer of technological skills for a better integration of ICT into classroom teaching and the creation of different “virtual campus” on partner sites. Based on norms and standards in force in the field of e-learning (LOM, SCORM, IMS) and making use of free software (open source), its basic purpose is to make online semantic devices for creation and management of educational resources for open and distant learning supporting training efforts relating to the administration of technology.
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Exploring Flexible e-learning Options in a Postgraduate Project Management Course

Exploring Flexible e-learning Options in a Postgraduate Project Management Course

Since its inception the Master of Engineering Studies (MEngSt) programme (Construction Management specialisation) has been offered on campus only. This taught programme attracts students typically with 3– 10 years or more of industrial experience who are looking to return to university to undertake advanced level studies as part of their career progression planning. A significant portion of students on the programme are enrolled part-time. A recent review of the programme recommended adding flexible learning options for students who wish to study from a distance or who cannot attend all lectures and labs owing to work commitments. This aligns with two elements of the University of Auckland’s current Strategic Plan: one, which advocates increasing the proportion of students enrolled in taught postgraduate programmes, and the second, which calls for innovative and advanced use of ICTs for teaching, learning, and research (University of Auckland, 2012). As a first stage in responding to this recommendation, one of the Project Management courses from the programme was selected to trial the development of more flexible learning options.
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E Commerce Project

E Commerce Project

E Commerce & Global Sourcing  Global sourcing is one of the widely known strategies of ensuring smooth business and access to markets in a cost effective manner. In such a scenario, E-commerce has brought in a new transformation. It has added to advantages like removing the barriers of time zones, differences in costs, geographical locations etc. This has resulted in a major push in development in infrastructure, technology and several other sectors across the globe. As we see, E commerce is driving the export and import and propelling the economic growth of numerous developing as well as developed nations. Business strategies are becoming easy to execute and business houses are having a wide range of options from where they can make their choices.
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Putting ourselves in the big picture: a sustainable approach to project management for e-learning

Putting ourselves in the big picture: a sustainable approach to project management for e-learning

the technology on people i.e., the users themselves (see interview comments below). Traditional project management and institutional planning strategies include budget and resourcing management strategies and generally involve a degree of change management and communication strategies. For the vast majority of users, if managed well, the implementation of new educational technology should be a liberating and enabling experience that facilitates good learning and teaching outcomes. The constant change, both in technology as well as other environmental factors within the case study institution has had a noted effect on staff. Part of the data collection in this study included structured interviews with staff from faculties and divisions. The effect on some academic staff is illustrated in these responses to the following research questions during interviews in 2008, six months after the institution-wide implementation of the LMS CSU Interact.
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