Top PDF Earning not learning? An assessment of young people in the jobs without training (JWT) group

Earning not learning? An assessment of young people in the jobs without training (JWT) group

Earning not learning? An assessment of young people in the jobs without training (JWT) group

For a substantial proportion of young people, leaving school, and finding a job which offered training and financial independence, had been a positive move. In the majority of cases, young people had intended to move into work at the end of Year 11, although included within this group were some who had started college courses and dropped out. They were clustered within the retail, engineering and business administration sectors. Some young people had applied for apprenticeships and had failed to secure a place. These respondents did not perceive themselves as being ‘disadvantaged’ or ‘insecure’ in comparison with their counterparts who had remained in full-time learning. They spoke positively about the benefits of working, in particular the changes in self-image they derived from being away from the classroom and in an environment where their skills and abilities were being utilised, valued and extended. In turn, their employers and parents did not regard them as ‘marginal workers’ or ‘failures’, but as young recruits who had the potential to build upon their skills and abilities within an applied training environment.
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'I just want a job' : what do we really know about young people in jobs without training?

'I just want a job' : what do we really know about young people in jobs without training?

Over recent years, a central concern of policy has been to drive up post-16 participation rates in full-time education and address the needs of young people not in education, employment or training (NEET). As a result, young people who enter work which is classified as ‘without training’ at 16/17 have largely been ignored. However, the decision to Raise the Participation Age (RPA) for continuing in learning for all 17-year olds from 2013 and for all 18-year olds from 2015 in England, together with a growing unease about the impact of the current recession on youth unemployment rates, have revived interest in the ‘jobs without training’ (JWT) group. This paper draws on the findings from two studies: first, a qualitative study in two contrasting local labour markets, of young people in JWT, together with their employers and parents; and second, an evaluation of the Learning Agreement Pilots (LAP), which was the first policy initiative in England targeted at the JWT group. Both studies reveal a dearth of understanding about early labour market entrants and a lack of policy intervention and infrastructure to support the needs of the JWT group throughout the UK. From this, it is concluded that questionable assumptions have been made about the composition and the aspirations of young people in JWT, and their
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Learning and earning : the impact of paid employment on young people in full-time education

Learning and earning : the impact of paid employment on young people in full-time education

4.10 FEDA’s pilot survey did not directly involve employers, and it is therefore difficult to be specific about the extent to which the requirements of the workplace are affecting students to an extent that could be claimed as unfair, unethical or illegal. Within our sample, almost all 18–19 year olds are being paid above the legal minimum hourly rates, and almost half of the 14–15 year olds are receiving more than £3.00 per hour. There are some claims that on occasion younger students are employed when older employees leave, in order to reduce wage bills, but it is not possible to say how widespread this practice is. Almost half of the students with jobs appear to be under at least occasional pressure from their employers to work for longer hours than they would prefer. In a minority of cases such pressure seems to be excessive, though we have no evidence that it is the policy of companies to exert such pressure, rather than the practice of managers and supervisors at local level. We also note with concern that in the UK it is quite legal for 14–15 year olds, who are below the minimum school leaving age, to be employed for numbers of hours per week well above the levels that have been shown to be correlated with poorer academic performance.
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Assessment Essentials of Problem based Learning in Improving the Second Basic Physics Learning Result

Assessment Essentials of Problem based Learning in Improving the Second Basic Physics Learning Result

then revised again in accordance with the shortcomings encountered in the classroom test so that it becomes a feasible product to use in the second basic physics lecture. Based on the results of research analysis and discussion, it can be concluded that physics learning results using PBL model treated with assessment is higher than the results of learning physics using PBL model treated without assessment. The learning process must be improved through applying the assessment process as an integral part of the learning process in accordance with the characteristics of learners. Learning with PBL approach does not merely give attention to the acquisition of declarative knowledge, but also the acquisition of procedural knowledge, therefore the assessment is not just enough with the test. Assessment and evaluation in accordance with the PBL model is to assess the work produced by students as a result of their work and to discuss the results of the work together.
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Valuing Employment Now: real jobs for people with learning disabilities

Valuing Employment Now: real jobs for people with learning disabilities

Job coaches help people to discover what work would suit their skills and interests, negotiate real jobs, and support individuals at work. But there is a shortage of skilled job coaches and quality varies. the Government will publish and consider how to accredit quality standards. there is also a funding gap, yet the taxpayer spends significant sums on people with learning disabilities through social care and education. the Government will encourage local authorities to refocus some of this on supported employment. the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) is also changing the Access to Work fund so that it better supports job coaching.
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Changes in the wage structure and participation in education and training for young people : an analysis of the England and Wales Youth Cohort Study

Changes in the wage structure and participation in education and training for young people : an analysis of the England and Wales Youth Cohort Study

This paper has shown that there was a significant change in the wage structure both at age 18/19 and at age 16/17 between 1998 and 2000. These changes coincide with the introduction of the NMW in April 1999, which directly affected the earnings of workers aged 18 and over. The analysis shows that wage increases were greatest at the bottom of the earnings distribution in particular for jobs where hourly earnings in 1998 were below £3.00 per hour, the minimum rate that applied to workers aged 18- 21 from April 1999. The findings for workers aged 18/19 were expected given that the NMW directly affected workers of this age and large numbers of young people earned below the minimum rate in 1998. However, changes of a similar magnitude for workers aged 16/17 was less expected as these workers are not covered by the NMW. It seems that the introduction of the NMW has affected the pay of young people aged below 18.
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Analysis and Forecast of the Youth Inclusion on the Labor Market Determining Factors in Romania and their Impact on the Social and Economic Development of the Society

Analysis and Forecast of the Youth Inclusion on the Labor Market Determining Factors in Romania and their Impact on the Social and Economic Development of the Society

At the local level in Romania, LABOUR OFFICES (LO) draw up annual plans for employment and training in accordance with the public policy strategy. These plans should, naturally, follow the plan of budgetary appropriations from which LOs benefit, but instead, the planning calendar, in practice, is not coupled directly with budget allocations, the latter being made later than LOs’ service schemes. The consequences are that the proposed indicators are either supplemented (without being related to budgetary supplements) or lowered (jettisoned developed centrally, without taking into account the capacity and the real needs of the territory).
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'It's like an itch and I want to get it away but it's still there' : understandings and experiences of anxiety and depression among young people with intellectual disabilities

'It's like an itch and I want to get it away but it's still there' : understandings and experiences of anxiety and depression among young people with intellectual disabilities

of articulating their distress. For a few, feelings were expressed more through actions than words. For example, Gary found it hard to put his feelings into words but regularly paced up and down his sitting room during the researcher’s visits. In most cases, a conventional interview format - where researcher and respondent may spend an hour or so seated facing each other, the former posing questions but keeping relatively quiet, the latter answering questions, hopefully in some detail - would not have worked in this study. Therefore, to further facilitate communication with and self expression by the participants, verbal methods were augmented with both activity and visual techniques. For example, the researchers accompanied some young people to cafes, pubs or bowling alleys or they went walking together. The use of photographs in research with people with learning disabilities dates back to at least the late 1980s (Simons, Booth and Booth 1989) when researchers took photographs of the long-stay hospitals people were leaving and the new community hostels into which they were moving, using these as cues to prompt discussion during interviews. In our study, some participants were given a disposable camera and invited to take photographs of people, places and events that were important to them. This again provided a focus for activity and discussion acting as a springboard for exploring other issues. The researcher often invited a participant to accompany him/ her to the shop to collect the developed film and then to a café where they could look at and discuss the photographs, with the participant invited to comment on each one.
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What do we know about the risks for young people moving into, through and out of inpatient mental health care? Findings from an evidence synthesis

What do we know about the risks for young people moving into, through and out of inpatient mental health care? Findings from an evidence synthesis

Relationships with young people outside hospital Main- taining relationships with outside friends is recognised as important in policy and guidance [32, 33]. Young people in hospital were reported as valuing relationships with friends at home but could also find these difficult to sus- tain [19]. Some described becoming distant from their friends before admission, ascribed both to the experience of illness and to peers not understanding [21]. Admission was seen as contributing to the deterioration of friend- ships [19, 28, 29], with others expressing discomfort that friends visiting saw them in a mental health facility [20] or describing friendships breaking down [28]. Others talked of deliberately disconnecting from friends outside of the unit as part of a process of recovery [19]. Whilst benefits are recognised in maintaining relationships with friends at home obstacles to this are recognised [32], including rules on visiting and conflicting priorities for young peo- ple [19], and geographical distance [19, 22]. Time away from friends was also seen as helpful as a way of reliev- ing pressures [22]. Young people recognised risks around reconnecting with friends post-discharge [19–21, 28]. In one study, ‘connectedness’ with both friends and families was found to change after being on an inpatient unit, and affected levels of depression and suicide attempts [30].
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Employment in Europe 1998. Jobs for people - people for jobs: turning policy guidelines into action. Report from the Commission. COM (98) 666 final, 20 November 1998

Employment in Europe 1998. Jobs for people - people for jobs: turning policy guidelines into action. Report from the Commission. COM (98) 666 final, 20 November 1998

Jobs for people- people for jobs: turning policy guidelines into action Job§ for p~ople - people for jobs: turning policy guideline§ into action The adoption of the Employment Guidelines[r]

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The Design of Video games in the Implementation of Malay Language Learning Among Foreign Students in an Institution of Higher Learning

The Design of Video games in the Implementation of Malay Language Learning Among Foreign Students in an Institution of Higher Learning

Papastergiou (2009) noted that some researchers predict the learning environment will be more fun  and  effective with  the application of video  games  as  compared to  traditional learning methods. Oblinger  (2004)  in  Papastergiou  (2009)  explains  that  several  factors  change  the  environment  for  better  learning  through video games: a) games can be multi‐sensory, active, and extraordinary experience, using problem‐ based learning; b) provide and add experience while using existing knowledge; c) provide feedback quickly  through hypothesis‐testing and enable students to learn by action; d) provide opportunities for students to  do  self‐assessment  by  scoring  marks  and  at  different  levels  of  achievement  as  well;  e)  improving  the  environment and social relations between players or students.  
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To Examine The Best Strategies With The Help Of ICT For Acquiring Sustainable Tourism Using SWOT Method (Case Study Of Dehradun/Mussourie, India)

To Examine The Best Strategies With The Help Of ICT For Acquiring Sustainable Tourism Using SWOT Method (Case Study Of Dehradun/Mussourie, India)

Based on survey done and given the undeniable role of information technology in increasing people's awareness of the world it can be said that information technology can play a key role in the development of the tourism industry and raise the awareness of tourists to the region's tourist attractions and encourage them through the various options, and help them to select the desired area for tourism. On the other hand, IT has the ability to guide tourists, to manage their time and costs In addition to the possibility to benefit regional tourism. On the other hand this science has the ability to stimulate business for local residents and tourists investors. With the correct management of information technology in the field of education it can help to enhance the capabilities, managers and local people in the efficiency of the tourism industry. However this would require the cooperation and coordination of tourism experts and IT management experts to create new jobs and increase employment of young people in activities related to the tourism industry according to the state Dehradun/Mussourie , especially during the summer holidays have significant tourists and can therefore provide jobs for many people. Dehradun/Mussourie with natural attraction and historical and cultural economic such as market of local and weekly that are offered local products such as food, agricultural products, and handicrafts can also be considered as an attraction for tourists in the economy of rural livelihoods. Due to these potential, this city has weakness of economic, social, cultural, ecological and also lacks planning. Planning and investment in facilities, development of residential, hospitality and tourism infrastructure, cheap and easy access to the Internet and social networks, can be effective to reduce the weaknesses and attract more tourists in the area, thus increasing the employment opportunities. By providing coordination framework among different institutions and related sectors for effective implementation of projects and providing facilities and services can help in the development of all aspects of tourism to the area and keep it in a certain way, by support and encourage the development of recreational facilities, leisure and sports complexes by various governmental and nongovernmental organizations in the study area for public use, also by creating Infrastructure and utilizing the main cultural heritage sites by promoting handicrafts can give tourism. Also legislation and special rules for optimum use of attractions and tourism products and prevention from
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The Employment Equation: Why our young people need more maths for today’s jobs

The Employment Equation: Why our young people need more maths for today’s jobs

Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge; Hudson, C. (2007). Working mathematics for the 21st century? A discussion paper on workplace numeracy and mathematics. England: National Research and Development Centre for Adult Literacy and Numeracy; Kent, P., Bakker, A., Hoyles, C., & Noss, R. (2011). Measurement in the workplace: the case of process improvement in manufacturing industry. ZDM, 43(5), 747-758; Roth, W. (2003). Competent workplace mathematics: How signs become transparent in use. International Journal of Computers for Mathematical Learning, 8(2), 161- 189; Triantafillou, C., & Potari, D. (2010). Mathematical practices in a technological workplace: the role of tools. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 74(3), 275-294; and van der Kooij, H. (2001). Mathematics and key skills for the workplace. In G. E. FitzSimons, J. O’Donoghue & D. Coben (Eds.), Adult and Lifelong Education in Mathematics: Papers from Working Group for Action (WGA) 6 : 9th International Congress on Mathematics Education, ICME 9 (pp. 231-242): Adults Learning Mathematics.
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Social work services for disabled children and young people and their families : assessment and eligibility : final report

Social work services for disabled children and young people and their families : assessment and eligibility : final report

The research found that some professionals feel that concerns about differences in provision – both between and within local authority areas – can sometimes be based more on perception than reality, and this is partly because comparing cases is not straightforward. For example, two children may, on the surface, appear to have a very similar condition, but may in fact have very different family situations or indeed one may have additional disabilities. As a result, the needs of these children can be very different and consequently the package of care implemented is different. The subtleties of circumstance may not always be apparent to service users. It was also felt that sometimes people hear about what others are receiving without knowing the details of their case, and that this can raise public expectations.
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Assessment of Accuracy Enhancement of Back Propagation Algorithm by Training the Model using Deep Learning

Assessment of Accuracy Enhancement of Back Propagation Algorithm by Training the Model using Deep Learning

used at the end of linear regression to determine the probability of an output to fall in each of the applicable classes. Deep belief nets with stacked RBMs' have been used for many applications such as speech and phone recognition. Later distributed techniques like Hadoop Map Reduce have been used for taking the advantages of deep learning over very large data sets 17 similar to the one done

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Young people not in education, employment or training

Young people not in education, employment or training

It is a very difficult thing to say but, having mooted the point already, there is an argument that, in the aspirational „knowledge-based economy‟ that is the Europe of the future, the young people who are „NEET‟ will struggle to find any place in private (and perhaps even public) sector arrangements. The „fit‟ referred to above may rarely be achievable. Should we now bite this awful bullet and think much harder about how we might give those who are ‘NEET’ (or at risk of it) some alternative hope for their futures through what might be called, drawing on the substance misuse field, a ‘harm reduction’ model (or public works, social activity and subsidised personal enterprise)? It may ultimately be better than trying to fob them off with poor and temporary work and training experience that may be more of a revolving door than a clear point of entry into permanent and sustainable employment. 120 [My emphasis].
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The Role of Formative Assessment in Learning Chemistry

The Role of Formative Assessment in Learning Chemistry

Formative assessment aids learning by generating feedback information that is of benefit to students and to teachers. Feedback on performance, in class or on assignments, enables students to restructure their understanding/skills and build more powerful ideas and capabilities. However, the provision of feedback information is not the sole province of the teacher. Peers often provide feedback – for example in group-work contexts – and students generate their own feedback while engaging in and producing academic work formative assessment also provides information to teachers about where students are experiencing difficulties and where to focus their teaching efforts.
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Le Magazine: Education and culture in Europe  2004 Issue 22

Le Magazine: Education and culture in Europe 2004 Issue 22

But every cloud has a silver lining. Modern technology came to my rescue and I now have a bionic ear. After waiting 13 years for a cochlear implant, I finally had the operation in October 2001. A whole new challenge then emerged: learning to listen and hear normally and to recognise speech. Although I’m English, I did this rehabilitation course in French. In a matter of months I had made tremendous progress. At the beginning I could only make out one of every three syllables and could manage to point to a drawing of a cat or squirrel, but before long I was able to recite, while looking at my feet, a full page of Le Petit Prince read by my teacher. The language barrier was still real for French accents and silent consonants, but in the end I managed to overcome it.’
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Helioscope: European Disability Magazine No  3 Spring 1995

Helioscope: European Disability Magazine No 3 Spring 1995

In principle, access to the EU programmes to promote education and training for primarily young people is open to disabled young people and children, schools and training establishments [r]

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Separated Young People Seeking Asylum and their Experiences of Undergoing and Age Assessment in the UK

Separated Young People Seeking Asylum and their Experiences of Undergoing and Age Assessment in the UK

Where requested certified interpreters, recommended by the organisations, were booked. On two occasions male interpreters aided the interview process, once through Dari and once through Pashto. I set aside time before each of to the interviews to meet with the interpreter to discuss the research aims and process with a view to facilitating the interpretation. Specific concerns of the interpreters, their reflections or feedback from previous experiences were encouraged to inform the research process as well as to address and respond to interpreters’ potential apprehensions (BPS, 2017). This briefing also included close examination of the Information Sheet and Consent Form to facilitate informed consent (Patel, 1999). The interpreters used the linguistic mode of interpreting (neutral stance, word-for-word translations) during the interviews, and a service user-centred approach during the phases of information giving and consent seeking (Baylav, 2003). Both interpreters stayed for a debrief after the interview finished to discuss matters around the interview process and research, ethical issues or give reflections and feedback. During one debrief session the interpreter reflected on his experiences of interpreting at age assessments. I have included reflective notes on this conversation in Appendix C. I checked in with both young people if the interpreter was acceptable to them and whether they could understand the language and accent.
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