Top PDF Effective curriculum practice at below Level 2 for 16/17 year olds

Effective curriculum practice at below Level 2 for 16/17 year olds

Effective curriculum practice at below Level 2 for 16/17 year olds

Flexibility to allow students to progress over different time periods was also important; students take shorter or longer to progress, developing different skills and attributes as part of this. It was consequently also important to ensure that there were progression routes available at the different points in the year when students were ready to progress. Regularly reviewing provision, to ensure it continues to meet the needs of students, employers and the local labour market was identified as important in securing good progression. Strategic discussions involved evaluating the programme at the end of each year, taking into account any feedback from Ofsted, staff and students. There was also evidence pointing to the importance of reviewing at the beginning of the year to ensure the programme met the needs of the incoming cohort of students. Building links between vocational subjects and English and maths could help build engagement with these subjects, particularly as the below Level 2 may feel they have previously failed to achieve these. More generally, for students who have had negative schooling experiences and/or gained a feeling of ‘failure’ in education, it was seen as important to build their ability to achieve incrementally by allowing them to succeed in ‘small things’ and publicly
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Effective curriculum practice at below Level 2 for 16/17 year olds

Effective curriculum practice at below Level 2 for 16/17 year olds

achievements based on gathering a portfolio of material. This also reflected feedback from Skills for Growth’s Ofsted report that achievement of qualifications was lower than hoped for. They were familiar with the approach of the selected awarding body and felt reassured about the product. It has devised a ‘scheme of work’ where Functional Skills modules and the units of this award are closely aligned and can be covered in the same sessions (with the criteria and evidence required for each type of learning matching up). Skills for Growth adopt a critical skills approach to effective teaching, and staff have been trained in this methodology. With this approach each session is based around a key challenge or problem, and the tutors/coaches will work to engage students with the problem. Each session should start with a recap of what has been covered to date, state the aims and objectives for the session (and an individual’s own targets if appropriate) and check what students already know. At the end of the session students discuss a scenario that will draw from the content of the session – these may be examples of Functional Skills exam questions, – and will finish with students reflecting on what they have learned and how this could be used in a work situation. These aspects have been introduced to help individuals prepare for exams and also to enable young people to ‘see the point’ of the learning they have undertaken. Skills for Growth tries to ensure
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Effective primary pedagogical strategies in English and mathematics in key stage 2: a study of year 5 classroom practice
from the EPPSE 3 16
longitudinal study

Effective primary pedagogical strategies in English and mathematics in key stage 2: a study of year 5 classroom practice from the EPPSE 3 16 longitudinal study

10 A concern raised by Alexander’s (2010) review of the primary curriculum was that homework might actually increase the gap between the more and less advantaged. Children from impoverished homes are less likely to have parents able to support them in their homework, to have an appropriate space in which to do their work and to have access to extra resources (computers, books and library resources outside the school, etc). In contrast, children from better off homes are more likely to have parents able to monitor and support their homework, a good environment in which to work and access to a large number of additional resources. This could mean that children from affluent families could make significant gains from the additional learning opportunities provided by their homework. Alexander concluded, however, that as evidence of the influence of homework on achievement was tenuous at best, homework was unlikely to exacerbate the differences between the more and less advantaged. The EPPE research for pupils’ progress from Year 1 to Year 5 indicated that in schools where teachers reported they gave more emphasis to homework, the EPPE children made significantly more progress (Sammons et al, 2008) The classroom environment contributes to how well children learn. Although previous EPPE work (Sammons et al 2006a; 2006b) reported generally positive classroom climates and low levels of teacher detachment, there was considerable variation. This meant that some children were leaning in much less favourable environments.
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Evaluation of pilot summer activities programme for 16 year olds

Evaluation of pilot summer activities programme for 16 year olds

2.52 An average of 61 young people left from each project during the induction phase, with a lower average of 17 leaving during the main activity phase. This ranged from some projects losing more than 300 before and 130 after compared with other projects losing none in the first phase and just two in the second. Information on rates of drop out proved difficult to monitor at a project level given the scale of infilling that took place as projects sought to ensure that the residential places they had booked were filled by someone. It was not atypical for a group of young people to be initially recruited and complete the induction activities and then be replaced with almost an entirely new group at a later stage. One of the case study partnerships encountered such difficulties after running a taster residential.
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Teaching practice in risk education for 5-16 year olds.

Teaching practice in risk education for 5-16 year olds.

Evidence from the interviews indicates that PSE subject teachers are most likely to draw on outside expertise provided by groups that promote education about health, safety and risk for young people. These agencies provide a range of curriculum support in the form of educational pamphlets, web-sites, videos and presentations (examples of curriculum support groups and resources are provided in Appendix 3). Nationally there seems to be no co-ordination between these schemes. Teaching staff indicated that they drew on these assorted resources if they became visible through publicity or personal contacts (see also section 7.4.1). The risk education content of PSE related subjects is significantly different to the other subjects that were the focus of this research; we discuss this issue at more length below (see section 5.2.4). It is apparent that, compared with other subject areas, PE and Science teaching staff are more inclined to use health and safety guidance from non-government sources (notably from BAALPE (e.g. BAALPE 2001) and CLEAPPS; especially publications). One explanation for this may be that, arguably, these subjects require greater levels of specialist knowledge for health, safety and risk management due to the subject matter, knowledge that on occasions has to be sought from other expert/professional sources, either in the form of training or published materials.
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Effective practice in the delivery and teaching of English and Mathematics to 16-18 year olds

Effective practice in the delivery and teaching of English and Mathematics to 16-18 year olds

Petroc College had approximately 1800 students studying English and maths in 2016/17. Petroc teaches English and maths functional skills and GCSEs by vocational area and has a dedicated team of 28 English and maths teachers. Their strategy has been to utilise these staff to develop an approach to managing counterproductive behavioural patterns of students with varying levels of need. One emphasis of this strategy is to promote a “growth mind-set” which encourages positive behaviours and aspirations in students. This aim is reflected in college messaging and the use of communications. Where possible, students are encouraged to think beyond a C towards higher grades. Emphasis is placed on promoting learning and avoiding situations in which students are “just in a resit class”.
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Effective practice in supporting entry/level 1 students in post-16 institutions (2015/27)

Effective practice in supporting entry/level 1 students in post-16 institutions (2015/27)

support is not having the desired effect, it is either improved or another mechanism is put in its place. Three providers mentioned new systems that they would be piloting in the next academic year with the objective of either improving retention, achievement or progression. Gauging the right level of support for students’ needs also to be carefully thought through. Providers acknowledge the need to balance sufficient support to enable progression without providing too much support that students become reliant. This is important as they progress to Level 2 and Level 3 where support resources (with the exception of specific SEN, Higher Needs Funded elements) are less prevalent.
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Effective practice in the delivery and teaching of English and Mathematics to 16-18 year olds

Effective practice in the delivery and teaching of English and Mathematics to 16-18 year olds

GCSE English and mathematics students are taught in classes based on their elected curriculum area with limited streaming. Where possible, students with a Grade D study with those who achieved the same grade, and the same for Grade E students. A sheet with a summary profile of every student in the class is created so that the subject teachers are aware of, and able to teach to, the more specific needs of students. This sheet includes the following information: name with accompanying photo of the student; previously achieved grade in the subject; anticipated target grade at the retake; marks achieved in any internal progress assessments; information regarding any educational and/or health needs; and an update on attendance, behaviour or performance issues. The latter could include concerns which could affect the student’s capacity to learn, for instance, low confidence, parental responsibilities, demonstration of high achievement potential. Senior managers reported that the profile sheets allow teachers to quickly refer to and
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Participation in Education, Training and Employment by 16-18 year olds in England: End 2014

Participation in Education, Training and Employment by 16-18 year olds in England: End 2014

Between 2013 and 2014 there was an increase from 2.0% to 3.3% in the proportion of 16-18 year olds in full-time education and studying for GCSEs as their highest qualification, with the biggest annual change at age 16, which rose 2.2ppts to 6.8%. This is likely to have been brought about by the requirements for meeting the new conditions of funding for maths and English introduced in August 2014 (see technical notes and definitions). Nearly half of 16-18 year olds were in full-time education studying for a level 3 qualification (48.3%), an increase of 0.7ppts from 2013. This reflects increased level 3 study at ages 16 and 17 (+0.6ppts and +2.1ppts respectively), and a roughly unchanged rate at age 18 (-0.1ppts).
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Supporting young Māori and Pasifika year olds that are outside the education system to attain NCEA Level 2 or equivalent qualifications.

Supporting young Māori and Pasifika year olds that are outside the education system to attain NCEA Level 2 or equivalent qualifications.

The ROA will show all NCEA (achievement) credits and/or NZQF (unit standard) credits that the young person has achieved. Record the number of credits the young person has achieved at NCEA levels 1 and 2, and any NZQF credits they may have attained whilst at school. Text in red will appear at the top of the ROA if the young person has any unpaid fees. If the young person does have outstanding payments due, discuss with them whether you can contact their parents/family to explain what this means and ask if they can make the payment to ensure the young person’s credits are awarded. Note that Youth Guarantee learners that access fees-free places are eligible to have their unpaid fees paid through a process administered by the New Zealand Qualifications Authority (NZQA). If neither of these options is feasible for the young person, let us know as we could enter into negotiations with NZQA on behalf of learners.
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Section 2: Differentiation in practice in the curriculum

Section 2: Differentiation in practice in the curriculum

This method of approaching the planning of the curriculum can help to offset the extra planning and preparation which teachers may feel daunted by when faced with the suggestions for workshops in differentiation by outcome, or the skills training in differentiation by classroom organisation.

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Practice Placement Handbook Academic Year 2015/16

Practice Placement Handbook Academic Year 2015/16

Students are guided to use practice placement opportunities to develop and consolidate core skills whilst also pursuing areas of specialist interest. They will access a range of placement settings which may encompass services based within the National Health Service (NHS), Private Sector, Social Services and Primary Health Care Services. In addition, there can be opportunity to experience occupational therapy in developing areas such as private and voluntary sector agencies to access ‘role emerging’ placement opportunities. Placements abroad may be considered in the later stages of a course where opportunity and resources permit.
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Cross - Curriculum Class Newspaper Year Level: 9

Cross - Curriculum Class Newspaper Year Level: 9

• This newspaper must be self funding so a mock up of the newspaper will need to be completed fairly early on for the Sales and Advertising person or team can go and secure advertisers,[r]

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A systematic review of the impact of networked ICT on 5-16 year-olds' literacy in English

A systematic review of the impact of networked ICT on 5-16 year-olds' literacy in English

In the studies by Ewing (2000) and Morgan (1997), there are projections from available data – a process of hypothesis-forming about practice as well as questions raised about how best to move forward research in the field. ‘Enhancement of online and offline student learning’ by Ewing looks at a range of views about using ICT in support of learning and postulates a model for ICT in support of learning. Its focus is not only on literacy learning. The study takes a constructivist approach to the enhancement of learning and, because constructivism (in the wake of Vygotsky, e.g. 1986) assumes communication is at the heart of a social, collaborative learning process, literacy learning is central to the process. While collaborative learning, it is suggested, requires enhanced literacy skills in speaking and listening, there are implications for reading and writing on screen (both online and offline). A useful distinction is made in the study between network literacy skills and computer literacy skills (see OECD 2001). Network literacy skills include “accessing and creating resources and communication with others” (p. 212). The study proceeds by evaluating data from three projects in the light of a composite model for ICT in support of learning. The other most significant elements of the model for the purposes of the present study are that: • Computer-based learning must include electronic mail and conferencing
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Implementing the Increased Flexibility for 14 to 16 year olds Programme : the experience of partnerships and students

Implementing the Increased Flexibility for 14 to 16 year olds Programme : the experience of partnerships and students

Amongst those identifying increased maturity was a male engineering student who made the following comment: ‘Well I’ve grown up a bit from what I was…I used to mess around a lot, but I haven’t messed around this year. In explaining this change, the student stated: ‘When you’re at school you get treated like a baby so you act like one, but when you’re at college you get treated like an adult so you work properly and don’t mess around so much.’ Similarly, a female catering student confided: ‘I think it makes me more mature, because when you are down at college and working with people who are older than you, you have to be really mature and not giggle and mess about.’ A male engineering student, who said that he nearly had not been able to take part in IFP because he had not previously been considered trustworthy enough was proud to say: ‘I have proved them wrong, and I have proved to myself that I can knuckle down and do it.’ On the matter of enhanced confidence, one female engineering student, the only girl in her group, who had initially felt slightly intimidated by embarking upon the course, made a particularly interesting comment: ‘I feel more comfortable doing things that, I don’t really know how to put it, like engineering that girls shouldn’t in theory be doing…I have got higher qualifications in engineering than most of the boys.’
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Participation in education, training and employment by 16-18 year olds in England: end 2013

Participation in education, training and employment by 16-18 year olds in England: end 2013

OET refers to young people who are studying, but are not included in other categories. The majority of these young people will be studying part-time in a further education college or sixth-form college or other institution types described under the heading ‘part- time education’ in SFR Table 2. However, some will be attending private colleges or training centres, and this activity is only reported under the OET heading. The relative contribution of private

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Evaluation of outreach interventions for under 16 year olds  Tools and guidance for higher education providers

Evaluation of outreach interventions for under 16 year olds Tools and guidance for higher education providers

An important element in this epistemology is that it is not concerned with finding single ‘solutions’ that exist outside time and context. Rather, it is concerned with understanding how young people are influenced by their life experiences – not ‘what works’, but what works in a given context and, importantly, why. It is only through understanding the latter element that practices can become robustly effective in the long-term and potentially transferable to other contexts. This is particularly appropriate to pre-16 outreach work due to the lengthy time lag between activity and application to higher education (HE).
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Action anticipation through attribution of false belief by 2 year olds

Action anticipation through attribution of false belief by 2 year olds

Following recording, a gaze replay AVI showing the exact location of the child’s gaze was exported at 25 fps from the Clearview programme. We took two measures of action anticipation. As our principal measure, we coded the location of the first saccade following the illumination of the windows. As all children were focused on the actor who had just turned around at this point, a clearly discernable saccade to one of the windows was available for every child who met the criterion for inclusion in the analysis. 17 out of 20 infants gazed towards the correct window following illumination (p = .003, p rep = .982, two-choice binomial test, two-tailed). There was no difference
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Factors associated with high levels of ICT capability among 14 16 year olds in English schools

Factors associated with high levels of ICT capability among 14 16 year olds in English schools

However, there is some doubt whether collegial approaches to educational management are possible in practice (Bush, 1995, p70). It is implicit in collegial management models that members of an organisation ultimately agree on its goals or find non-conflicting solutions that satisfy a multiplicity of different needs. Such conflicts are likely to be more difficult and take longer to resolve where participants have equal status than in formal organisations where the needs of one person or group are likely to be subservient to those of others. Collegial management is likely to involve more elaborate systems of committees, and consequently, decision making can be ponderous and unwieldy. It is more likely that some of those involved will not understand the technical issues, so that the quality of decision making may be eroded. Moreover, where decisions emerge from a complex committee system, it may not be clear who is responsible for implementation. These features of collegial organisations may affect their ability to implement effectively new and rapidly developing technologies. It may well be that the appointment of a senior manager with overall responsibility for ICT is desirable even in an ostensibly collegial organisation. This senior manager would have oversight of all decision making but the flatter management structure more typical of collegial models would ensure that the different needs of ICT specialists and the whole staff are taken into account.
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Evaluation of Increased Flexibility for 14 to 16 year olds Programme : delivery for cohorts 3 and 4 and the future

Evaluation of Increased Flexibility for 14 to 16 year olds Programme : delivery for cohorts 3 and 4 and the future

Although all of the nine Lead Partner coordinators who were interviewed explained that training was available for their staff, not all of the tutors who were interviewed said that they had undergone some training. Although in one partnership, the coordinator stated that initial training was compulsory, in others this was not said to be the case and it appeared that tutors could choose training as appropriate. Some tutors were not concerned that they had not participated in any training in relation to delivering IFP courses as they felt that they had sufficient skills to teach 14 to 16 year olds students and, indeed, a few felt that the younger students did not differ noticeably from those aged 16 and over. These tutors often indicated that they were aware that training could be provided, should they wish to access it. In one partnership, the Lead Partner coordinator explained that the responsibility for ensuring staff were trained as required was devolved to the heads of faculty as part of their overall responsibility for their staff. Nevertheless, there were some staff in colleges who indicated that they would like more training than had been offered or accessed. In some instances, they had been unable to access it due to lack of time and other commitments. In other cases, they requested training in relation to behaviour management and working with students with attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
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