Top PDF Embedding Formative Assessment : evaluation report and executive summary

Embedding Formative Assessment : evaluation report and executive summary

Embedding Formative Assessment : evaluation report and executive summary

It should be noted that this impact was picked up organically during evaluation visits, and only afterwards were the delivery team asked to supply information about schools’ previous TEEP involvement. The observation helped inform the decision in the impact study to conduct a subgroup analysis based on prior exposure to TEEP. This showed a significant positive impact (5% level) for schools that hadn’t been exposed to TEEP, whilst the impact on all schools was only marginally significant (10% level). The process evaluation findings indicated that involvement in TEEP seemed to have the potential to affect delivery of EFA both positively and negatively. Generally, teachers and leads said that TEEP and EFA were built on the same collaborative and experimental approach, which meant that particularly the TLC format was already ingrained in the school and among teachers. School Leads in schools previously exposed to TEEP were more likely to state that EFA had not had the same transformative impact because TEEP had already changed the schools’ working practices. This may partly explain why the impact analysis found a significant, positive impact for the subgroup excluding such schools. ‘If we’d not done TEEP, then I can absolutely see that setting up those cross curricular groups would have been quite a revolutionary idea and a different way of doing it, but because we set those up in 2013 when we started TEEP, had a couple of years running them, I think that’s why it didn’t have the big wow effect that everyone was telling me it should have.’
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Peer Specialist Training and Certification Program Evaluation Report: October 2010 Executive Summary

Peer Specialist Training and Certification Program Evaluation Report: October 2010 Executive Summary

Suggested citation: Steinley-Bumgarner, M., Kaufman, L., Stevens-Manser, S., & Murphy-Smith, M. (2010). Peer Specialist Training and Certification Program: Evaluation Report October 2010, Executive Summary. Texas Institute for Excellence in Mental Health, Center for Social Work Research, University of Texas at Austin.

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Evidence for the Frontline: Evaluation report and executive summary. March 2017

Evidence for the Frontline: Evaluation report and executive summary. March 2017

in interviews about engaging with the research evidence they had been provided with. It could be that the follow-up respondents were reflecting on a more informed view of using research—perhaps acknowledging some of the time and effort implications of engaging with research, highlighted as challenges elsewhere in this report. It may also be that teachers discerned a difference between ‘academic’ research (for example, published in an academic journal), and research evidence that they found applicable in the classroom (as provided in a number of cases through E4F). Durbin and Nelson (2014) suggest that research is more likely to inform practice in the classroom if educational research commissioners consider school-level needs and interests, and if teachers receive training in how to interpret research findings. 20 In contrast, the mean score for Measure 4 was lower for follow-up respondents, indicating that at follow up, teachers were more positive about their school encouraging the use of academic research. This may reflect some initial culture changes in these schools towards engaging with research, for example as part of teachers’ continuing professional development (CPD), or built into schools’ policies and plans for the year.
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TextNow Transition Programme : evaluation report and executive summary

TextNow Transition Programme : evaluation report and executive summary

Four pupil focus groups were conducted by one researcher from the evaluation team after the end of the programme. A purposive sample of participating schools was selected for the focus groups to maximise variation in terms of geographical distribution, rural/urban school location, socio-economic profile, and type of governance. Of the six schools originally approached, two declined, one due to a forthcoming Ofsted inspection, and another did not have staff capacity to make the necessary arrangements for the visit. The four schools which agreed to participate in the focus groups varied in their degree of engagement with the TextNow programme. The TextNow coordinator in each school was asked to select 6 pupils from the intervention group that were representative of the range of pupils who had received the intervention in terms of gender, reading ability, attitudes towards reading, programme outcomes and English as a second language status (EAL). Due to pupil absence, there were fewer focus group pupils at one school. In total, 22 pupils (10 girls and 12 boys) from the intervention group participated in focus groups conducted in four secondary schools. The participant characteristics broadly matched those requested by the evaluators. Pupils were asked about their experiences of the programme at both their primary and secondary schools and how they thought participation in the programme had impacted their enjoyment of reading and reading skills. Each focus group was recorded and a thematic focus group report with illustrative quotes was prepared.
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Teacher Observation : evaluation report and executive summary, November 2017

Teacher Observation : evaluation report and executive summary, November 2017

27 U.S. states found that teacher observations, coupled with online, on-demand professional development, resulted in significantly improved student achievement in reading and maths on standardised assessments. For example, schools with Lower Observation Rates (with a mean number of teacher observations of 2.76) collectively experienced 2.22 net gain in the percentage of students rated as ‘Proficient’ or ‘Advanced’ representing a statistically significant 3.9% improvement. In contrast, schools with Higher Observation Rates (with a mean number of teacher observations of 8.49) collectively experienced 13.16 net gain in the percentage of students classified as ‘Proficient’ or ‘Advanced’ representing a statistically significant 24.9% improvement from baseline. The comparison reflects 6.37 times the growth in the Higher Observation Rate schools compared with the Lower Observation counterparts. Similarly, a study of mid-career elementary and middle school teachers in Cincinnati Public Schools found that teachers were more effective at raising student achievement during the school year when they were being evaluated than they were previously (Taylor and Tyler, 2012). 3 Participating teachers were evaluated over a year, based largely on classroom observation. The effect on student attainment was relatively small, at 0.11 standard deviations for maths attainment, but had not been tested using a randomised controlled trial (RCT). It was anticipated that the impact of the structured observation would continue to develop over time, particularly if schools adopted a cultural shift towards regular peer observation. Collectively, these findings suggest that effective teacher evaluation systems based on well-structured teacher observation can enhance teacher effectiveness and raise student attainment.
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Summer Active Reading Programme : evaluation report and executive summary

Summer Active Reading Programme : evaluation report and executive summary

The findings of this trial are in line with the few other RCTs of book gifting programmes that have been reported, which have found a limited number of significant effects. These studies have tended to examine changes to parental attitudes and the few identified effects have been small in size. In this study, there were, however, promising signs regarding the improvement of children's attitudes towards reading, particularly for children from non-FSM households. Therefore, there is potential that this programme, with refinement, could improve reading attitudes which could then act as a catalyst to encourage children to engage with linked activities or programmes that focus more directly on improving reading comprehension outcomes. For example, meta-cognition and self-regulation programmes have been found to be low cost and highly effective ways to develop comprehension and thinking skills (EEF, 2014 - http://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/toolkit/meta-cognitive-and- self-regulation-strategies/), which could build on the improved reading attitudes provided by an effective book gifting programme. Adopting such an approach would depend on: (a) ascertaining the effectiveness of a refined version of the Summer Active Reading programme through a further fully powered trial; (b) studies looking at the added value of linking interventions that target both reading attitudes and comprehension outcomes; and (c) a full assessment of cost-effectiveness of the Summer Active Reading programme.
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Writing about values : evaluation report and executive summary

Writing about values : evaluation report and executive summary

There is already considerable policy and practice activity being undertaken on the assumption that an individual’s aspirations, attitudes and behaviour (motivation, self-concept, self-belief and locus of control) can be influenced to improve educational outcomes. Most of the research conducted in this area is based on correlational studies using path analysis as a proxy for causality (for example, Marsh and Martin, 2011). The evidence of a causal effect remains unclear. The question is whether pupils with high motivation or aspiration perform well, whether high performance leads to higher motivation, aspiration and self-belief, or whether both are a consequence of something else. The ongoing debate about the sequence of events cannot be resolved without some more closely controlled and independent trials. This was one of the main recommendations in the report to the Joseph Rowntree Foundation based on a review of 166,000 studies (Gorard, See and Davies, 2012). The self-affirmation project attempts to contribute to this developing evidence base.
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Switch-on Effectiveness Trial: Evaluation report and executive summary. May 2017

Switch-on Effectiveness Trial: Evaluation report and executive summary. May 2017

First, the process evaluation indicates that, in some schools, class teacher involvement in Switch-on was limited. While part of the appeal of Switch-on as an intervention is that it is TA-led, evidence from the literature indicates that one-to-one catch up interventions should be ‘additional but explicitly linked to normal teaching and that teachers should monitor progress to ensure tutoring is beneficial’ (Higgins et al., 2014, p. 10). This suggests that even if TAs deliver the intervention, class teachers should be involved to ensure that the intervention is embedded in a wider literacy strategy for the child. The fact that class teachers were not systematically included in the planning and delivery of Switch-on in schools could therefore have undermined the achievement of outcomes. This is a challenge common to many one-to-one interventions that require children to leave the classroom. The previous efficacy trial highlighted the challenge of scheduling the intervention within the school timetable as a barrier to successful implementation. This remained a challenge in the current effectiveness trial and the inconsistent involvement of class teachers appears to have exacerbated timetabling difficulties. Second, the literature identifies having a strong champion at a senior level as a success factor (for example, Tanner et al., 2015) for effectively implementing literacy interventions. Evidence from the process evaluation suggests that the engagement of senior level staff was inconsistent across participating schools. This meant resource and timetabling issues were not always resolved adequately, which affected schools’ ability to deliver the intervention effectively.
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Improving Writing Quality Evaluation Report and Executive Summary May 2014

Improving Writing Quality Evaluation Report and Executive Summary May 2014

Calderdale Excellence Partnership (CEP) recruited 23 primary schools and three secondary schools that were served by the recruited primary schools and a SRSD developer came from North America to deliver training. The 23 primary schools were randomly assigned by a statistician at the York Trials Unit so that Year 6 teachers in the 12 intervention schools received training to deliver the intervention to their Year 6 pupils. Three secondary schools agreed to honour the randomisation by allocating intervention and comparison school pupils into separate Year 7 classes, and SRSD continued to be delivered, by secondary school English teachers, to the intervention children in the first term of their Year 7. All children (from both the intervention and comparison groups) were tested under exam conditions using the Progress in English 11 (Long Form) Test developed by GL Assessment as a measure of general writing ability. Primary schools allocated to the comparison group were offered the training in the SRSD approach at the end of the trial (known as a ‘wait-list’).
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Maths counts : evaluation report and executive summary

Maths counts : evaluation report and executive summary

Phase 2 was launched in the Spring of 2016. The aim of this phase was to rehearse the main trial including the randomisation process, data collection from schools, training of teaching staff and testing the Digital Tool. This phase also aimed to assess the suitability of the Progress Test in Maths and to collect some preliminary impact data. During this phase a lot of discussions went on between the evaluation and the project teams. For example, the evaluators discussed with the project team the conduct of the trial, the importance of minimizing attrition, getting schools to keep them informed of changes in staff and pupils and to maintain the integrity of the randomisation. Developers kept a record of the sessions conducted by each school and monitored the delivery of lessons. Evaluators were kept informed throughout the pilot phase about the progress of the Digital Tool and the recruitment process. When it was learnt that the overall sample for the main trial would not be large enough to detect the effect size suggested, discussions were made with the project team and the EEF on the need to increase the number of schools to recruit big schools with more than one form entry.
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Paired Reading: Evaluation report and Executive summary

Paired Reading: Evaluation report and Executive summary

In addition to the risk of treatment diffusion, the process evaluation found that there had been some variation amongst participating schools with regards to the set-up, delivery and implementation of the programme. For example, it was recommended to run the pupil training in four sessions. However, schools used a range of approaches to train the pupils involved, from not giving any advance training at all to using the first few sessions to gradually introduce them to the process. Similarly, the length of the sessions varied from school to school, with some able to use the recommended half an hour, while others were forced to condense the lesson into a shorter time period. There was also a varying level of support provided to pupils within the intervention by the teachers involved, based mainly on the reading ability of the pupils. However, these appear to be natural variations between the settings of the schools involved and are unlikely to have affected the dosage of the intervention for the pupils involved.
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Philosophy for children : evaluation report and executive summary

Philosophy for children : evaluation report and executive summary

It is clear that P4C, whatever its other possible benefits in terms of wider outcomes, does not hinder children’s attainment at KS2 or their progress on CAT scores. In fact, in maths and reading there is a discernible but small benefit at KS2, equivalent to about two months of extra progress. All other indicators are positive but smaller (with the score for KS2 writing close to zero). Teachers and pupils generally report improved behaviour and relationships. This is achieved at a cost of around £16 per pupil. If there are wider or longer-term benefits to studying philosophy at primary school then this could make the intervention cost-effective. However, we do not yet know about these benefits. And there may be difficulties for some schools in adapting the existing setup to the demands of the intervention, especially if attempted as a whole-school process.
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Dialogic Teaching : Evaluation Report and Executive Summary

Dialogic Teaching : Evaluation Report and Executive Summary

Evidence for the effectiveness of dialogic teaching as a pedagogical approach can be found in research studies that have either made use of observation methods, or have involved small-scale intervention. Resnick, Asterhan and Clarke (2015) brings together a set of studies that provide a broad base of evidence for the effectiveness of structured dialogic teaching approaches in raising pupil attainment. Observational and quasi-experimental studies have been carried out that have explored the effects of implementing dialogic teaching in mathematics (Mercer and Sams, 2006), science (Mercer, Dawes, Wegerif and Sams, 2004; Mercer, Dawes and Staarman, 2009), and literacy (Reznitskaya, 2012). Such studies have shown interventions based on a dialogic teaching approach to be effective in increasing the quantity and quality of classroom talk, and in raising attainment. For example, Mercer and Sams (2006) report an evaluation of the Thinking Together intervention for mathematics learning in Year 5. This intervention led to substantial changes in classroom practice (seven teachers undertook the intervention, with 196 pupils), and significant gains in mathematics scores, with an effect size of +0.59. The Thinking Together intervention consisted of twelve lessons focusing on data handling, properties of numbers, and number sequences. Mercer and Sams (2006) is a good example of the evaluation that has been carried out on this approach to date: although positive effects were observed, the sample size was small, and the intervention focused on a particular section of one curriculum subject.
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Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (PATHS): Evaluation report and Executive summary, June 2015

Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (PATHS): Evaluation report and Executive summary, June 2015

Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (PATHS) is a school-based social and emotional learning (SEL) curriculum that helps children to manage their behaviour, understand their emotions, and work well with others. It is a universal intervention for all children in a given class. PATHS consists of a series of lessons that cover topics such as identifying and labelling feelings, controlling impulses, reducing stress, and understanding other people’s perspectives. This SEL curriculum is supplemented by activities that support the application of new skills during the course of the school day (for example ‘teachable moments’ such as using a playground incident to demonstrate the importance of resolving conflicts peacefully), and parental materials—such as send-home activities— that aim to extend learning to the home environment. A detailed description of PATHS can be found in the Methods section of this report. The developer of the programme is based at the Evidence-Based Prevention and Intervention Support Centre at Pennsylvania State University (PSU), and has been involved in training, promoting, and supporting the programme worldwide for many years.
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ScratchMaths: evaluation report and executive summary

ScratchMaths: evaluation report and executive summary

Proposals for assessment of computational thinking have been made that seek to do such assessment within and as part of assessment of computing activity and its outcomes. Selby, Dorling and Woollard (2014) map computational thinking components to a pathway to assess progress on the computing curriculum in England. Brennan and Resnick (2012) propose that computational thinking can be assessed through assessment of Scratch design activities including portfolio analysis, artefact-based interviews and design scenarios, among others. This developmental view seeks to account for the complexity and enmeshed nature of different aspects of computational thinking. Meerbaum-Salant et al (2013) designed a pre-test, post-test study specifically to test conceptual understanding within the Scratch context, with items testing understanding of concepts such as repeated execution, variable and event handling. Thus, their test linked conceptual understanding to programming skills. Given the design criteria above, their test was not suitable in the trial as it was specific to Scratch.
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Minnesota Alternative Response Evaluation Second Annual Report. Executive Summary

Minnesota Alternative Response Evaluation Second Annual Report. Executive Summary

Outcomes. Components of the assessment protocol are recommended for use but will require training and adequate reimbursement. The dyadic therapy model appears to be an effective short-term treatment approach for those dyads who completed their treatment program. Follow-up studies will be needed to determine long-term effectiveness. Engagement/case management/outreach activities provided by the treating therapist within the context of the therapeutic alliance with the parent were considered critical to completion of the treatment program and to the effectiveness of the intervention.
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Executive Summary School Accountability Report Card,

Executive Summary School Accountability Report Card,

Every school in the Alhambra Unified School District has always been and continues to be committed to improvement in student learning. Teachers are actively participating in standards-based professional development, assessment and strategies to help all students meet state standards. Alhambra Unified School District offers staff development opportunities to teachers, administrators, and instructional aides. Staff members build teaching skills and concepts through participation in conferences, workshops and collaboration meetings

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Executive Summary School Accountability Report Card,

Executive Summary School Accountability Report Card,

➢ California Modified Assessment (CMA), an alternate assessment that is based on modified achievement standards in ELA for grades three through eleven; mathematics for grades three through seven, Algebra I, and Geometry; and science in grades five and eight, and Life Science in grade ten. The CMA is designed to assess those students whose disabilities preclude them from achieving grade-level proficiency on an assessment of the California content standards with or without accommodations.

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Executive Summary School Accountability Report Card,

Executive Summary School Accountability Report Card,

California High School Exit Examination Grade Ten Results by Student Group – Most Recent Year (if applicable). Group[r]

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Sundays Well Transaction Report : Executive Summary

Sundays Well Transaction Report : Executive Summary

“I undertake to promptly inform the Chief Executive Officer of the National Asset Management Agency of any modification that are required to maintain the accuracy of this declaration, and the above statements, arising or resulting from changes in my personal situation and/or financial arrangements”

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