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Emotional Labour in Mental Health Field Workers

Emotional Labour in Mental Health Field Workers

Fieldworkers seemed to embrace the display rules, especially around appropriate and inappropriate emotional displays with clients. Commitment to display rules ensures changes in behaviour in accordance with these rules (Gosserand & Diefendorff, 2005). In the case of fieldworkers it did not affect only the observable emotional expressions but the internal experience of emotions as well. Fieldworkers saw genuine emotions like empathy, compassion, concern, respect, care, and the desire to help – all of which are display rules pertaining to both the organisation and seemingly wider context of mental health work – as necessary aspects of their work, without which their capacity to help clients would be impaired. These display rules are not just about appropriate displays when with clients. They are about the actual feeling and experiencing of the emotions that are seen as desired and needing to be portrayed to clients.
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Emotional Eating in the Work Place: The Eating Patterns of Mental Health Workers

Emotional Eating in the Work Place: The Eating Patterns of Mental Health Workers

with a list of community resources if needed to address any emotional issues that may have been raised during the interview. Data Analysis Plan Once the interviews were completed, I read and reread the transcripts to create codes that allowed themes and categories to be identified in the data using Moustakas’s (1994) approach to phenomenological analysis. The data were correlated to each specific research question. According to Moustakas, phenomenological analysis entails a six-step approach, which I followed in the present study. The first step in the plan is for the researcher to describe their own personal experiences related to the phenomenon, so the researcher can identify their own biases and the focus can be on the participants in the study. The second step requires the researcher to identify significant statements in the data, and the researcher will develop a list of the statements. For the third step, the researcher will take the significant statements and assemble them into larger themes of data. The researcher describes in detail how the participants experience the study in the fourth step, which may include the participant’s verbatim answers and is also called the textural description. The fifth step provides the structural description of the data, which means the researcher will describe the context and setting regarding how the phenomenon was experienced. Lastly, the sixth step requires the researcher to combine both the
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Will emotional intelligence training enhance social workers’ emotional labour in Ogun State Nigeria?

Will emotional intelligence training enhance social workers’ emotional labour in Ogun State Nigeria?

Emotional intelligence levels of social workers are important in achieving positive work atmos- phere and helping relations. It has been observed that many social workers are in the profession with “blind spots” resulting from trauma they personally experienced in their family (Sellers & Hunter, 2005). Based on this, it is important to foster developable and integrated capability to execute task in a social work context resulting in behaviour that contributes to desirable results. This work found its premise on the observed inadequate emotional skills of social workers. While, there are documental evidence on the effectiveness of EI in fostering human performance, successes and efficiency, there is dearth of literature on its use in the field of social work in Africa in general and particularly Nigeria. In addressing the gap, this study set out to address three objectives. First, it examined the emotional intel- ligence of social workers; second, the main effect of emotional intelligence on participants' level of emotional labour was investigated and third, the generated hypothesis seeking significant effect of emotional intelligence training programme on emotional labour skills of social workers was tested.
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Social Emotional And Mental Health Checklist

Social Emotional And Mental Health Checklist

Inactivity is social emotional and health charity workers, like images obtained under the age and social emotional or pdfs. Aspects of social emotional and mental health checklist for many young people with a draft moved to move this page is effective teaching the bundle. Familiar place through their social emotional and mental health checklist aims to use! Respectful and social checklist for vaginal health first time for these patterns hold true even struggle with school. Reports can you measure social emotional and health and bike or mental health and gives appropriate touches when children through play, make to this. Within social worker, social emotional and checklist for the help. Camps set of each mental and language therapy services, go ahead and emotional health issues, make to go. Familiar place in the social emotional mental health checklist aims to practice, where and know that consumers can now pretends to find a range from. Had a post on emotional mental health promotion and educational settings providing immediate access to view it. Easily pinpoint the social emotional and mental checklist for your inbox on wix site. Family member to follow and mental health checklist for education specialists, celebrate how are can staff to varying degrees, make to you. Side to wait, social and mental health checklist for each child picks out some insight into the uk. Constructively resolving interpersonal skills as social emotional mental health problems impacting on emotional foundations for emotional wellbeing as their own site and glue them to send the page.
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The role of social work in the field of mental health: dual diagnoses as a challenge for social workers

The role of social work in the field of mental health: dual diagnoses as a challenge for social workers

Keywords: social work; mental health; dual diagnosis; stigma; needs; everyday life Prispevek problematizira uporabnost medicinske terminologije v okviru socialno delavskega konteksta. Avtorici se zavzemata, da skozi procese pomocˇi ljudem, ki jim je bila nalepljena dvojna diagnoza, ne bi prispevali k stigmatizaciji. Uporaba medicinske terminologije na podrocˇju socialnega dela je pogosteje strategija izkljucˇevanja ljudi iz sistema pomocˇi kot pa trenutek oskrbovanja s primerno obliko pomocˇi. Avtorici zakljucˇujeta, da socialni delavci ne potrebujejo znanja o diagnozah. Diagnoze so pomembe samo kot informacija, ki ilustria specificˇne izkusˇnje uporabnikov in njihovo zaznavanje realnosti, razpolzˇljivih virov in over, ki jih imajo v vsakdanjem zˇivljenju. Nacˇrtovanje intervencij v socialnem delu mora biti utemeljeno na operacionaliziranih definicijah vsakdanjega zˇivljenja uporabnikov storitev pomocˇ, kot npr.: kako prezˇiveti dan, katere so za njih pomembne in cenjene vloge v zˇivljenju, kaksˇne so njihove zˇelje in potrebe. Kljucˇne besede: socialno delo; dusˇevno zdravje; dvojna diagnoza; stigma; potrebe; vsakdanje zˇivljenje
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Strategies to Retain Mental Health Workers in Community Mental Health Clinics

Strategies to Retain Mental Health Workers in Community Mental Health Clinics

holistically and making career growth opportunities available, this also encourages workers to envision themselves progressing their careers within the organization, thereby decreasing turnover. Encouraging the self-care of MHWs. Worker satisfaction can be increased despite increasing job demands with the strategy of maintaining worker health and wellness, as well as by encouraging employee self-care. Working in the mental health field can be mentally and physically taxing, and the current participants recognized the importance of not only retaining staff, but also ensuring the ongoing health and wellness of these employees. Participant 3 cited their organization’s strategy of supporting workers with their health needs at all times, explaining:
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Mental Health Workers Play Different Roles in the District Mental Health Service

Mental Health Workers Play Different Roles in the District Mental Health Service

and Mccann (2007) interviewed 10 persons in England—suffering from schizophrenia—about their opinion of the nurse’s therapeutic treatment with neuroleptic injections. They used a semi structured interview scheme which included 20 questions. The researchers found that the relationship between patient and nurse, as this study reveals, was that the situation not only was therapeutic, but also provided a forum where psychosocial and clinical issues could be discussed and explored. The users of the service felt they had a role and an influence in the giving of their care. The different studies show that this area is in need of more research. This field is also changing according to new reforms and the role of the health personnel and of the patient needs to be focused on. This paper explores how, within the process of taking care of the patients and the administration of the medication, health workers are able to take care of their patients’ needs in different ways. The statement of the problem was:
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Mental health: the new frontier for labour economics

Mental health: the new frontier for labour economics

This 6-year plan aimed to ensure that by Year 6 the NICE Guidelines were being delivered throughout the country. The method was a new service for which most of the staff would have to receive a year’s training on top of whatever mental health training they already had. The service would need roughly 8,000 therapists, of whom 6,000 would have to be trained. In addition there should be employment support workers (1 for every 8 therapists) to help people stay in work or regain employment if they had lost it 20 . The programme has gone remarkably well and has been continued by the present government. Recovery rates are now approaching 50 per cent and are improv- ing as more and more of the therapists become experienced and fewer are trainees.
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A Qualitative Study of the Impact of Emotional Labour on Health Managers

A Qualitative Study of the Impact of Emotional Labour on Health Managers

In the 1990’s I undertook a long project in a health service that involved the use of reflective practice as a management development tool (Boucher, 2007). This gave me the opportunity to spend considerable time per fortnight, over almost a year each time, with groups of managers, exploring the issues of greatest concern to them. Invariably the issues gravitated around managing people and in particular, managing their own and others emotions. I became increasingly concerned about the emotional well-being (and in some cases, mental health) of some of the participants and in an attempt to help them, found the framework of emotional labour and it proved useful for me and the participants. It seemed to me that an inordinate amount of emotional energy was being spent by these managers every day in managing the moods, attitudes and personalities of their staff and colleagues and that this was different to what I saw in other industries. I also began to wonder in what ways the nature of the work performed and the gender composition of the workforce might have an impact. It seemed to me that, for some reason, the emotional investment made by these managers led to them becoming tired, and depressed and in the course of my work with them, I saw a number of very good people simply burn out and give up.
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“Woulda, coulda, shoulda”. Workers’ proactivity in the association between emotional demands and mental health

“Woulda, coulda, shoulda”. Workers’ proactivity in the association between emotional demands and mental health

Emotional display rules could be observed in any professional role, but they become particularly relevant in the service sector where interpersonal interactions are involved. In this context, workers should exhibit specific emotions to customers as part of their job [9]. When workers perceive that the emotions they feel are incongruent with those they should display during customer interaction, they could adopt different emotional strategies in order to regulate their inner state and manifest behaviour [10]. Accordingly, a first aim of the current study was to explore the outcomes of the emotion regulation process by investigating the positive relationship between emotional dissonance and hostile customer relations that, in turn, are expected to report a positive association with the occurrence of mental health symptoms. Furthermore, the second aim of this research was to delve deeper into the buffering role of individual characteristics on the process of emotion regulation: in particular, proactive personality was considered as a protective factor that can help individuals to cope with managing emotions at work.
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Job characteristics and mental health for older workers

Job characteristics and mental health for older workers

Cronbach’s alpha (α) for the individual scales were; quantitative demands α=0.72, cognitive demands α=0.78, influence at work α=0.81 and possibilities for development α=0.82. The Ten-Item Personality Inventory (TIPI) (25) measured five personality dimensions; two items per dimension. The dimensions were Extraversion, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, Emotional Stability and Openness to Experience. Each of the 10 items were rated on a 7-point scale with 1 being disagree strongly to 7 agree strongly. The theoretical range of the TIPI was 0-70 with the individual dimensions having a theoretical range of 0-14. Cronbach’s alpha for the individual dimensions ranged from 0.28-0.47.
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The Mental Health and Social-Emotional Development of Young Children

The Mental Health and Social-Emotional Development of Young Children

When providing support in the classroom for the mental health wellness of all children, the interdisciplinary team can implement strategies in the school so that educators implement an approach that “defines and teaches expected behavior, acknowledges students’ prosocial behavior, and responds to discipline problems fairly and consistently” (Anderson & Spaulding 2007). The interdisciplinary team will consist of members of multiple disciplines to include counselors, psychologists, occupational therapists, behavior specialists, teachers, administrators, and mental health agencies – each providing knowledge in their field of expertise to support students (Frauenholtz, Mendenhall, & Moon, 2017). Because the number of young children with mental health issues continues to increase, educational institutions also need to use strategies that allow school staff to work together in addressing behavioral problems. Rather than teachers, administrators, and support teams reacting individually to disruptive behavior, a systematic school change as a proactive approach and could improve the functioning of all children
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Stress, burnout, and job dissatisfaction in mental health workers

Stress, burnout, and job dissatisfaction in mental health workers

Stress, burnout, and job dissatisfaction in mental health workers Rössler, Wulf Abstract: As the industrial world has transformed toward a service economy, a particular interest has developed in mental health problems at the workplace. The risk for burnout is significantly increased in certain occupations, notably for health care workers. Beyond the effects of an extensive workload, many working hours, or long night shifts, the medical field has specific stressors. Physicians work in emotionally demanding environments with patients, families, or other medical staff. They must make quick decisions while faced with a quite frequent information overload. All of these stressors have to be weighed against a rapidly changing organizational context within medicine. Today, economics objectives have priority over medical values in health care. In principal, mental health workers should experience similar work stressors and the same contextual factors as health professionals from other medical disciplines. However, several studies have identified stressors that are unique to the psychiatric profession. These challenges range from the stigma of this profession, to particularly demanding relationships with patients and difficult interactions with other mental health professionals as part of multidisciplinary teams to personal threats from violent patients. Other sources of stress are a lack of positive feedback, low pay, and a poor work environment. Finally, patient suicide is a major stressor, upon which a majority of mental health workers report post-traumatic stress symptoms.
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Social Workers in Mental Health Clinics & Outpatient Facilities

Social Workers in Mental Health Clinics & Outpatient Facilities

The problems addressed by social workers in mental health clinics and outpatient facilities include those associated with the stress of everyday living; behavioral deficiencies; crises brought on by emotional, environmental, or situational occurrences; eating disorders; parent child problems; marital problems; depression; schizophrenia; bipolar disorders; and other forms of psychopathology (Gibelman, 2005).

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Mindfulness, mental health and emotion regulation among workers

Mindfulness, mental health and emotion regulation among workers

Our first three hypotheses were assessed using univariate and multivariate analysis of variance (ANOVA and MANOVA) and the prediction analysis technique (Hildebrand, Rosenthal, & Laing, 1977; Szabat, 2005). Grégoire and Lachance (2015) have pointed out that, in studies aimed at assessing the influence of MBIs among non-clinical populations, the prediction analysis technique represents a valuable complement to commonly applied statistical techniques such as ANOVA and MANOVA. They argue that in these studies participants often show few difficulties at baseline, making it more difficult to detect improvement or changes using traditional types of analyses of variance. Moreover, others have shown that analysis of variance sometimes underestimate the effects of an intervention, especially in small sample sizes (Ducharme, Lévesque, Zarit, Lachance & Giroux, 2007; Lévesque, Ducharme, Zarit, Lachance & Giroux, 2008). Unlike ANOVA and MANOVA, prediction analysis takes ceiling and floor effects into account in the score distribution at baseline, and the phenomenon of regression towards the mean for participants at both ends of the scale (extreme scores) (Whitlatch, Zarit & von Eye, 1991). Additionally, while ANOVA and MANOVA are used to analyze the mean differences between groups, prediction analysis serves to assess expected successful outcomes for those who take part in the intervention (experimental condition), and unsuccessful outcomes for those not participating in the intervention (control condition). This technique allows predictions for each participant based on: 1) their scores on dependant variables at baseline, and 2) the group they are in (experimental or control). Our fourth hypothesis was tested according to Hayes’ (2013) procedure for testing mediation effects using regression-based path analysis via Mplus Version 6 (Muthén & Muthén, 2011). This method allowed us to generate bootstrap confidence intervals for the indirect effects of mindfulness to wellbeing, distress and burnout through the mediating variables of impulse control and emotional awareness. This technique has proven to be superior to the causal steps approach devised by Baron and Kenny (1986). In fact, many simulations’ studies have shown that bootstrapping is one of the most statistically powerful methods for testing mediation with the lowest Type I error, while the causal steps approach is one of the least statistically powerful approaches (Hayes, 2009).
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Motivation types and mental health of UK hospitality workers.

Motivation types and mental health of UK hospitality workers.

Distressed workers find it difficult to utilise their creativity fully (Dunnagan et al. 2001 ) and are more likely to exhibit reduced work effectiveness (Gilmour and Patten 2007 ). For example, depression hinders productivity and contributes to disability, absenteeism, and possible premature early retirement (Blackmore et al. 2007 ). Economically speaking, a workplace with distressed workers suffers from a high turnover (International Labour Organization 2010 ), which yields significant costs to the organisation (Villanueva and Djurkovic 2009 ). In the UK, more than 10 million working days are lost to stress, depression, and anxiety every year, costing the economy more than £10 billion annually (Paton 2007 ). The severity of this problem is reflected in the UK hospitality industry (Lashley and Rowson 2000 ) where the average rate of turnover is 180% for bar staff and over 30% for managers (Badger and Lashley 2000 ). In terms of monetary implications, the cost of replacing each front-line hospitality employee is approximately £1000, and five times this amount for managers (Lashley and Best 2002 ).
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Emotional Intelligence & Mental Health in the Classroom: Experiences of Canadian Teachers

Emotional Intelligence & Mental Health in the Classroom: Experiences of Canadian Teachers

correlation between mental health distress and feelings of burnout. It is possible that this group of experienced teachers have found effective ways to cope with and manage their moderate mental health concerns such that it does not interfere significantly with their social and emotional competencies at work or that their work is not the primary source of the distress that triggers or perpetuates these symptoms. Accordingly, it is also reasonable that teachers have been able to seek supports when they began to feel mild symptoms of burnout and through this, they were able to limit the escalation of these symptoms despite ongoing mental health struggles. Indeed, the majority of teachers have sought out counselling and most found it helpful. Overall, the results from the TBM coincide with other literature in the field suggesting that the majority of teachers indicate some feelings of burnout and experience emotional exhaustion (Oberle &
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Mental Health and Intellectual Disability: The Experiences of Disability Support Workers in Relation to the Mental Health Needs of Clients

Mental Health and Intellectual Disability: The Experiences of Disability Support Workers in Relation to the Mental Health Needs of Clients

findings for future research and practice. Summary of Findings Through the interviews of five DSWs three thematic categories and nine themes were identified that detailed their experiences of supporting adults with ID with issues of mental health. Within the category of challenges, primary and secondary disabilities, staffing issues, and access to adequate services were identified as struggles for both support workers and their clientele. Communication and social issues can hinder the individuals’ day-to-day experiences as well as their needs in terms of emotional and psychological health. Individuals with ID have a high rate of secondary disabilities such as psychological disorders which was recognized by the participants of this study. Access to adequate supports within the leadership, medical, and mental health systems was also recognized as problematic. Several DSWs felt the frustration of not being listened to or struggling with wait times when attempting to acquire the assistance needed for their client. Finally, staffing issues such as low staff to client ratios, inconsistent approaches, and a lack of adequately trained staff to draw from were viewed as hindering the DSW’s ability to provide the help needed by their clientele. In addition, these issues mean that adults with ID are not necessarily receiving the support they require in a timely manner which can have negative effects on their mental well being.
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Disability retirement of workers in the health field at a university hospital

Disability retirement of workers in the health field at a university hospital

ABSTRACT Objective: To identify the causes of disability retirement for workers in the health field at a university hospital. Method: A retrospective cross-sectional study conducted in 2014, by analyzing the records of the medical registry of workers in the health field of the university hospital of a public university of Paraná, who retired due to disability, from 2000 to 2013. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The study was approved by the Research Ethics Committee, CAAE: 0344.0.268.000-12. Results: 40 were granted disability pensions. The main causes of disability retirement were mental and behavioral disorders (45.0%), followed by musculoskeletal diseases (25.0%), diseases of the circulatory system (7.5%) and neoplasias (7.5%). No significant association between variables has been made. Conclusion: The groups of diseases leading to disability retirement are the most common among the Brazilian population and preventable.
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The effects of emotional labour on wellbeing: Contrasts between health care settings

The effects of emotional labour on wellbeing: Contrasts between health care settings

emotional engagement as a role requirement differed markedly between the four groups. Palliative care nurses explained that emotional engagement with clients was a central aspect of their role and an aspect they actively pursue, supporting previous findings (e.g. Holmberg, 2006; James, 1992; Li, 2005; McIlfatrick, 2007; Melin-Johansson, Mok & Chiu, 2004; Seymour, Ingleton, Payne, & Beddow, 2003; Skilbeck & Payne, 2005). Emergency nurses also described instances in which they engaged with clients; however this was mainly to facilitate the efficient running of the emergency department and to protect themselves, co-workers, and other clients. Patient registration clerks, working alongside emergency nurses, showed far less inclination to become involved with difficult interactions with clients and generally did not see this as part of their role. Occasionally there was evidence that interactions between clerks and clients were of greater depth, but this was always of secondary importance to the information gathering aspect of the role. For renal nurses, the more predictable environment of renal wards, combined with the formation of long term relationships with clients, means that engagement with clients proceeded more naturally and was not generally associated with highly emotive interactions as was the case for the palliative care or emergency nurses. However, when asked specifically about their responsibility for the emotional state of clients and their preparedness to engage emotionally, the renal nurses indicated that they considered this to be an important aspect of their role.
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